Author Topic: Sterile seeds  (Read 2653 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Sterile seeds
« on: October 23, 2008, 01:31:45 PM »


Mutant Seeds for Mesopotamia 


Picture Link

by Andrew Bosworth, Ph.D.
October 15, 2008

One would think that Iraqi farmers, now prospering under "freedom" and "democracy," would be able to plant the seeds of their choosing, but that choice, under little-known Order 81, would be illegal.

But first, it is important to set the context. Most people have never heard of the infamous "100 Orders," but they help explain why the majority of Iraqis remain opposed to foreign occupation. The 100 Orders allow multinational corporations to basically privatize an entire nation, and this degree of foreign and private control has not been witnessed since the days of the British East India Company and its extraterritoriality treaties.

A few examples of the 100 Orders are illuminating:

Order 39 allows for the tax-free remittance of all corporate profits.

Order 17 grants foreign contractors, including private security firms, immunity from Iraq's laws.

Orders 57 and 77 ensure the implementation of the orders by placing U.S.-appointed auditors and inspector general in every government ministry, with five-year terms and with sweeping authority over contracts, programs, employees and regulations. (1)

Back to one of the most blatant orders of all:

Order 81. Under this mandate, Iraq's commercial farmers must now buy "registered seeds." These are normally imported by Monsanto, Cargill and the World Wide Wheat Company. Unfortunately, these registered seeds are "terminator" seeds, meaning "sterile." Imagine if all human men were infertile, and in order to reproduce women needed to buy sperm cells at a sperm bank. In agricultural terms, terminator seeds represent the same kind of sterility.

Terminator seeds have no agricultural value other than creating corporate monopolies. The Sierra Club, more of a mainstream "conservation" organization than a radical "environmentalist" one, makes the exact same case:"This technology would protect the intellectual property interests of the seed company by making the seeds from a genetically engineered crop plant sterile, unable to germinate. Terminator would make it impossible for farmers to save seed from a crop for planting the next year, and would force them to buy seed from the supplier. In the third world, this inability to save seed could be a major, perhaps fatal, burden on poor farmers." (2)

What makes this Order 81 even more outrageous is that Iraqi farmers have been saving wheat and barley seeds since at least 4000 BC, when irrigated agriculture first emerged, and probably even to about 8000 BC, when wheat was first domesticated. Mesopotamia's farmers have now been trumped by white-smocked, corporate bio-engineers from Florida who strive to replace hundreds of natural varieties with a handful of genetically scrambled hybrids.

Where does such hubris come from? It comes from the entire mission surrounding the invasion of Iraq, which, upon closer inspection, had been planned years in advance by a faction of "neo-cons" who adopted Leon Trotsky's glorification of the state, his theory "permanent revolution," and his goal of exporting revolution worldwide. The neo-con revolution aims to alter the economic, political and cultural foundations of nations on the other side of the planet (rejecting old-fashioned notions of self-determination, popular sovereignty and even the nation-state system). This mission includes the transformation of agriculture and the establishment of "food control" over local populations.

Order 81 fits into this revolutionary program, and it is quite diabolical upon closer inspection. First, it forces Iraq's commercial farmers to use registered terminator seeds (the "protected variety"). Then it defines natural seeds as illegal (the "infringing variety"), in a classic Orwellian turn of language.

This is so incredible that it must be re-stated: the exotic genetically scrambled seeds are the "protected variety" and the indigenous seeds are the "infringing variety."

As Jeffrey Smith explains, author of Order 81: Re-Engineering Iraqi Agriculture:

"To qualify for PVP [Plant Variety Protection], seeds have to meet the following criteria: they must be 'new, distinct, uniform and stable'... it is impossible for the seeds developed by the people of Iraq to meet these criteria. Their seeds are not 'new' as they are the product of millennia of development. Nor are they 'distinct'. The free exchange of seeds practiced for centuries ensures that characteristics are spread and shared across local varieties. And they are the opposite of 'uniform' and 'stable' by the very nature of their biodiversity." (3)

Order 81 comes with the Orwellian title of "Plant Variety Protection." Any self-respecting scientist knows, however, that imposing biological standardization accomplishes the exact opposite: It reduces biodiversity and threatens species. So Order 81 comes with an Orwellian title and consists of Orwellian provisions.

Jeffrey Smith peels away the layers of mischief behind Order 81, finding it nonsensical that six varieties of wheat have been developed for Iraq:"Three will be used for farmers to grow wheat that is made into pasta; three seed strains will be for 'breadmaking.'

Pasta? According to the 2001 World Food Programme report on Iraq, 'Dietary habits and preferences included consumption of large quantities and varieties of meat, as well as chicken, pulses, grains, vegetables, fruits and dairy products.' No mention of lasagna. Likewise, a quick check of the Middle Eastern cookbook on my kitchen shelves, while not exclusively Iraqi, reveals a grand total of no pasta dishes listed within it.

There can be only two reasons why 50 per cent of the grains being developed are for pasta. One, the US intends to have so many American soldiers and businessmen in Iraq that it is orienting the country's agriculture around feeding not 'Starving Iraqis' but 'Overfed Americans'. Or, and more likely, because the food was never meant to be eaten inside Iraq at all`¦" (4)

Just in case Iraqi farmer can't read, Order 81 enforces the new monopoly on seeds with the jackboot. Order 81 makes this clear in its own text, buried at the bottom of the document, as is most screw-you fine print:"The court may order the confiscation of the infringing variety as well as the materials and tools substantially used in the infringement of the protected variety. The court may also decide to destroy the infringing variety as well as the materials and tools or to dispose of them in any noncommercial purpose." (5)

Order 81 is about power and profit, but it disguises itself as humanitarian legislation.

Topping it all off, the entire document puts on rather magisterial airs. It was signed by L. Paul Bremer himself, with his own hand, and presumably with his own pen:
"Pursuant to my authority as Administrator of the Coalition Provisional Authority`¦"

Like the Roman Proconsuls, Paul Bremer also spent a year in the provinces, governing the so-called barbarians`¦

The above is an excerpt from Andrew Bosworth`s new book: Biotech Empire: The Untold Future of Food, Pills, and Sex, available at Amazon.
-Andrew Bosworth, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of Government at the University of Texas at Brownsville.

Notes

1. Uruknet Report, "Have You Ever Heard of Bremer's 100 Orders?" 11 April 2008.
2. Institutional Report, Genetic Engineering at a Historic Crossroads," The Sierra Club Genetic Engineering Committee Report, March 2001.
3. Jeffrey Smith. "ORDER 81: Re-Engineering Iraqi Agriculture - The Ultimate War Crime: Breaking the Agricultural Cycle." Global Research and The Ecologist, 27 August 2005, Vol 35, No. 1.
4. Jeffrey Smith. "ORDER 81: Re-Engineering Iraqi Agriculture - The Ultimate War Crime: Breaking the Agricultural Cycle." Global Research and The Ecologist, 27 August 2005, Vol 35, No. 1.
5 CPA/ORD/26 April 2004/81, p. 27.
Article nr. 47991 sent on 16-oct-2008 04:02 ECT

www.uruknet.info?p=47991
The views expressed in this article are the sole responsibility of the author and do not necessarily reflect those of Uruknet .
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline dean_saor

  • Brigadier General
  • *
  • Posts: 3657
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2008, 03:16:14 PM »
I wonder what Khazar felons are hiding behind "Monsanto, Cargill and the World Wide Wheat Company"?
Cha do dhùin doras nach d'fhosgail doras eile;
No door shut but another door opened

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline dean_saor

  • Brigadier General
  • *
  • Posts: 3657
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #3 on: October 24, 2008, 12:01:34 AM »
It's a very good read. Molly Kaye spent most of her early life in India and like nearly all sons and daughters of the Raj spoke Urdu as her first language. I hope you haven't seen the film version and are therefore are able to use your own imagination, as two of the principal characters seem to have been really badly miscast.

A kinsman of mine was at Meerut on 10 May 1857 with a British (i.e. Queen's, not HEIC) cavalry regiment, and was killed in the fighting for Delhi (this was the battle for which the Corps of Guides force marched 580 miles from Hoti Mardan in 22 days).

I hope you enjoy your book. You could try Shadow of the Moon afterwards.  :)
Cha do dhùin doras nach d'fhosgail doras eile;
No door shut but another door opened

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #4 on: October 24, 2008, 02:44:38 PM »

It's a very good read. Molly Kaye spent most of her early life in India and like nearly all sons and daughters of the Raj spoke Urdu as her first language. I hope you haven't seen the film version and are therefore are able to use your own imagination, as two of the principal characters seem to have been really badly miscast.
I have not seen the Film. ''Gone With The Wind'' was great, I read the book afterwards, twice. I started the book you recommended last night, but I did not get too far into it. I love reading in bed, so tonight I shall retire sooner.

A kinsman of mine was at Meerut on 10 May 1857 with a British (i.e. Queen's, not HEIC) cavalry regiment, and was killed in the fighting for Delhi (this was the battle for which the Corps of Guides force marched 580 miles from Hoti Mardan in 22 days).

In the Colonial times the well to do sure had the life of Reilly(sp?). My Dad spent short visits--less than a week at a time--in India, during semester breaks. Twice in Ceylon (Sri Lanka) and South East Asia. His brother was the captain of a ship. Most of his travels took place in the late 20's and early 30's. Many fascinating tales he told me as a child, the Atlas was never far away--he is responsible for my love of geography and travel. It sure is a different world, the contrasts, the beauty, the abject poverty, the homeless sleeping in doorways... Just think, how many we have now in own countries.

Speaking of travel, have you read any books by Bill Bryson?


I hope you enjoy your book. You could try Shadow of the Moon afterwards.  :)
I think I will, thank you.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline ChrisPDX

  • Major
  • *
  • Posts: 1249
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2008, 03:58:25 PM »
Of course, I am very upset over these seeds and I have heard about them before.

But what about survival of the fittest? (Bare with me here, hehehe)

I have been experimenting with my vegetable garden. I save the seeds from the best vegetable from that type of plant, then replant those seeds the next year. I am just hoping that I will develop better vegetables or vegetables that  have developed better to survive better in my garden. .........It's harmless and worth a try, but I can't always find those seeds the next year.....hehehehe

But I found my butternut squash seeds from two years ago, and those plants did much better this year than the store pumpkin seeds I bought this year.

It's a work in progress.......remind me in 2 to 3 years about this.....heheheh....I'll give you an update....

Love,

ChrisPDX


Boo!

Offline dean_saor

  • Brigadier General
  • *
  • Posts: 3657
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #6 on: October 25, 2008, 10:50:55 AM »
Quote
Speaking of travel, have you read any books by Bill Bryson?

You know, I haven't. He's been on my list, but I've never got round to him. Thanks for reminding me as I'd completely forgotten.
Cha do dhùin doras nach d'fhosgail doras eile;
No door shut but another door opened

Offline NewMath

  • Group Commander
  • *
  • Posts: 2041
  • Karma: +13/-2
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2008, 04:00:38 PM »
Quote
The American Seed Trade Association has a motto: "First, the Seed."

God apparently concurs as S/He chose plants that bear seed as the first gift to bestow upon "Their" mortal creation. Check it out: the First Gift (Genesis 1:29).

Nice gift. Contemplate for a moment the great coconut versus the microscopic tobacco seed. Or the tiny mustard seed, greater than which our Faith is not. From a single seed come thousands more. Seed enough to eat, to feed and to sow to perpetuate the cycle. All Man's needs covered: food, fuel, clothing and shelter. The grass heroically protruding through astroturf on a Florida freeway and General Sherman (no, the tree) both started from a single seed.

The seed is truly the ultimate repository of freedom. The freedom to divorce from the restrictions of decaying and corrupt entrenched human institutions, to go back to the land and provide for one's self and family. To strike at humanity's free access to seed is to undercut liberty at its very root, to create dependency on the glass onion of institutional strata through which all needs must be filtered and fulfilled. If you can grow your own, the canalization of your consumption through the economic system is compromised. Can't have that! The system (uh-oh) depends on all needs being met by buying, preferably things mined. Not by growing. Implicit in growing is a giving-back. Implicit in mining is theft.

This is where I always end up: the seed. Hemp is so threatening to the prevailing order because it strikes directly at the insidious assumption that somehow government has legitimate jurisdiction over my Right to go into my own garden, plant a seed and provide for my needs with the harvest. Where did they get that? I don't recall relinquishing the First Gift to a priest of any stripe whatever guise they come in this time.
                                                                                         

Offline lewis

  • Staff Sergeant
  • *
  • Posts: 168
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2008, 05:47:04 PM »
Where's your sig. line come from?

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #9 on: October 26, 2008, 02:32:34 PM »
Of course, I am very upset over these seeds and I have heard about them before.

But what about survival of the fittest? (Bare with me here, hehehe)

I have been experimenting with my vegetable garden. I save the seeds from the best vegetable from that type of plant, then replant those seeds the next year. I am just hoping that I will develop better vegetables or vegetables that  have developed better to survive better in my garden. .........It's harmless and worth a try, but I can't always find those seeds the next year.....hehehehe

But I found my butternut squash seeds from two years ago, and those plants did much better this year than the store pumpkin seeds I bought this year.

It's a work in progress.......remind me in 2 to 3 years about this.....heheheh....I'll give you an update....

Love,

ChrisPDX




I wonder if the seeds we buy now at the stores here are already engineered ones? I don't have a garden these days. I used to save the seeds from good specimens.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #10 on: October 26, 2008, 02:44:35 PM »
You know, I haven't. He's been on my list, but I've never got round to him. Thanks for reminding me as I'd completely forgotten.

http://www.randomhouse.com/features/billbryson/flat/home.php


Good ones to read:

*** Neither Here nor There: Travels in Europe

*** The Lost Continent: Travels in Small-Town America

*** A short history of nearly everything

In a sunburned country

A Walk in the Woods

They are all good.

"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline NewMath

  • Group Commander
  • *
  • Posts: 2041
  • Karma: +13/-2
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #11 on: October 26, 2008, 03:42:42 PM »
Quote
Where's your sig. line come from?

i made it up.

Offline dean_saor

  • Brigadier General
  • *
  • Posts: 3657
  • Karma: +1/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #12 on: October 27, 2008, 01:00:09 AM »
I had thought to start with the one he wrote on Australia - which was that, by the way? - my father took it with him and my mother when they went to visit his brother and sister there. However, I'll go with whichever I find first.
Cha do dhùin doras nach d'fhosgail doras eile;
No door shut but another door opened

Offline grizzle

  • Group Major
  • *
  • Posts: 1494
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #13 on: October 27, 2008, 08:26:26 AM »
Yeah. I wish I'd saved an heirloom seed company's address that someone on LF gave me. I hear that many of them sell seeds that produce no seeds or sterile seeds.
"Yes I know, science fiction...but actually, science fact." - Vincent Price in Scream and Scream Again

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #14 on: October 27, 2008, 05:19:43 PM »
Yeah. I wish I'd saved an heirloom seed company's address that someone on LF gave me. I hear that many of them sell seeds that produce no seeds or sterile seeds.

We have two seed banks here, within a 40 mile radius. I think they got started during the time when Monsanto and a Canadian farmer had a big legal dispute. I forgot the details.

Check out your local farming areas, inquire if there are seed banks.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline NewMath

  • Group Commander
  • *
  • Posts: 2041
  • Karma: +13/-2
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #15 on: October 27, 2008, 05:58:11 PM »
i think the best way to find heirloom seeds is still the old-fashioned way. hang around the local farmers market a little bit, or better yet, stop and buy something on the side of the road--most of those guys will talk your ear off.
taking a road trip to a rural nursery can also pay off. when i lived in southern ohio, i used to go out to amish country every spring and pick up some really good stuff, like brandywine tomatoes.
of course, the best part about obtaining seeds locally is that you know they will do well in your own garden.


Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #16 on: October 27, 2008, 07:30:28 PM »
i think the best way to find heirloom seeds is still the old-fashioned way. hang around the local farmers market a little bit, or better yet, stop and buy something on the side of the road--most of those guys will talk your ear off.
taking a road trip to a rural nursery can also pay off. when i lived in southern ohio, i used to go out to amish country every spring and pick up some really good stuff, like brandywine tomatoes.
of course, the best part about obtaining seeds locally is that you know they will do well in your own garden.



That is true. The farmers markets are not cheaper than the stores, but everything is so much fresher and tastier, because it's picked at the right time. What a difference! I happily support them. I don't have any land now, but people do go to the seed bank, ALSO to donate seeds!
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline NewMath

  • Group Commander
  • *
  • Posts: 2041
  • Karma: +13/-2
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #17 on: October 27, 2008, 07:34:47 PM »
just remember...you arent paying for the vegetables...youre paying for the gardening advice.  ;)
the vegetables themselves let you know if their advice is worth taking.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #18 on: October 27, 2008, 11:07:24 PM »
Our little ''1 acre farmer'' in the neighborhood, also has a used book store. So he sells both, used books and veggies for very reasonable prices and gives lots away too. (He stores my windsurfer for free.) And he loves to talk. I got a bucket full of squash, all different ones. Some are cute and turn a brilliant orange, I keep them all Winter and Spring. 
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
Re: Sterile seeds
« Reply #19 on: October 28, 2008, 12:01:44 AM »
Yeah. I wish I'd saved an heirloom seed company's address that someone on LF gave me. I hear that many of them sell seeds that produce no seeds or sterile seeds.

Hey look, there may be one near you. :-)))

Merchants and Purveyors
of
Heirloom Seeds

Not all that long ago, seeds for heirloom vegetables were hard to find. Fortunately, that is changing. Several seed companies now specialize in heirloom vegetables. Others offer a mix of old-timers and modern varieties. As hopeful as this trend is, many heirloom vegetable varieties are threatened and may soon become extinct. Still, there is time to save these plants. All it takes is a patch of land (or a container), water, sun, and some seeds. The rest is up to you.

As every gardener knows, seed catalogs are wonderful reading. Between the tantalizing descriptions of varieties and the first-rate cultural information, many catalogs can double as reliable gardening books. They are also interesting as historical sources, but readers will sometimes find that catalogs offer some very different dates and historical information for certain heirlooms. Gardeners (especially those re-creating a period garden) should rely on the old rule of thumb that historical facts need to be verified with three independent sources.

Here are a mix of commercial seed companies, museums, and non-profit organizations that sell heirloom vegetable seeds, and the things you need to grow them. I selected these particular sources because I've had good experiences with them, or have heard good things about them from my sources. I list them here for informational purposes only, without any guarantees. There are, of course, many other fine sources of heirloom seeds.

Note: Many heirloom vegetable varieties are not available in the seed trade, but can be found through seed saving networks. For more information, see also: Seed Savers, Not all that long ago, seeds for heirloom vegetables were hard to find. Fortunately, that is changing. Several seed companies now specialize in heirloom vegetables. Others offer a mix of old-timers and modern varieties. As hopeful as this trend is, many heirloom vegetable varieties are threatened and may soon become extinct. Still, there is time to save these plants. All it takes is a patch of land (or a container), water, sun, and some seeds. The rest is up to you.

As every gardener knows, seed catalogs are wonderful reading. Between the tantalizing descriptions of varieties and the first-rate cultural information, many catalogs can double as reliable gardening books. They are also interesting as historical sources, but readers will sometimes find that catalogs offer some very different dates and historical information for certain heirlooms. Gardeners (especially those re-creating a period garden) should rely on the old rule of thumb that historical facts need to be verified with three independent sources.

Here are a mix of commercial seed companies, museums, and non-profit organizations that sell heirloom vegetable seeds, and the things you need to grow them. I selected these particular sources because I've had good experiences with them, or have heard good things about them from my sources. I list them here for informational purposes only, without any guarantees. There are, of course, many other fine sources of heirloom seeds.

Note: Many heirloom vegetable varieties are not available in the seed trade, but can be found through seed saving networks. For more information, see also: Seed Savers, Seed Savers, Seed Exchanges, and Seed Societies





"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.