Author Topic: Biometrix in Reuters  (Read 522 times)

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Offline migl22

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Biometrix in Reuters
« on: December 09, 2004, 05:27:00 AM »
UK: Need a job? Get a card - arresting ID pitch to business

It might not be your Big Brother's Database, but the UK ID scheme has certainly mastered doublespeak. Take, for example, the way it will force businesses to joyfully embrace ID card checks - or else.

The Bill's Regulatory Impact Statement tells us that the bill has no provisions "which allow the Government to require business, charities or voluntary bodies to make identity checks using the identity cards scheme." And indeed it doesn't. But David Blunkett gave us a taste of what this really means in his speech to the IPPR last month. Referring to the provisions of the 1996 Asylum and Immigration Act which require employers to check that potential employees are eligible for employment (i.e. not illegal immigrants), he noted that "clause 8 has been very difficult to implement because employers quite rightly say that they are not an immigration service and they can`t easily ascertain whether someone is legally in the country without great difficulty."

Under the Act it is a criminal offence for an employer to fail to make an adequate check, but this particular provision is a difficult one to bring in and to enforce, because employers and their organisations could reasonably protest about cost and about not being an immigration service, and because if the Home Office did prosecute then they'd most likely fail to get a conviction because the employer could claim to have seen a document that looked genuine, and how the blazes were they to know? Well, hello employers, now you are an immigration service.

Blunkett continued: "The verification process under ID cards would remove that excuse completely and people would know who was entitled to be here and open to pay taxes and NI." So once the scheme exists there's no reason for the Home Office not to enforce clause 8, and employers are going to find using the ID scheme pretty compelling - or else...

http://www.raidersnewsupdate.com/lead-story3.htm


Scannable humans complicate ideas of privacy

Scott Silverman, chief executive of Applied Digital Solutions Inc., is banking that a microchip in his upper right arm will bring the company vast riches one day.

For now, however, the implanted chip, approved in October by the Food and Drug Administration, is attracting more media queries and privacy concerns than cash. Silverman realizes it might take some time before the public comes around to his vision of a VeriChip in every arm, making personal, medical or financial information accessible with the wave of a wand.

"This is not an iPod," said Silverman, comparing the device, which is about the size of a large grain of rice, to the personal music player. "This will not happen next month, next year, or even over the next five, 15 or 20 years. But it will work into our culture and our lives. It will almost take on a life of its own."...

With fewer than 1,000 people "chipped," uses have ranged from the whimsical to deadly serious. In Barcelona, Spain, club-hoppers with the chip get instant entry to a bar's VIP room and can use the same chip to put drinks on their tab. In Mexico City, VeriChip gives the attorney general and his associates access to documents on top-secret drug investigations.

Silverman thinks VeriChips could become ubiquitous for critically ill or Alzheimer's disease patients, giving emergency room personnel instant access to life-saving medical information.

Used in tandem with door-mounted scanners, implanted chips could track the whereabouts of employees in high-security facilities like nuclear power plants or military bases. They could function in lieu of a credit card, with cashiers scanning the customer along with the groceries.

The FDA's approval of VeriChip for medical recordkeeping purposes last month opens the door to its use. But the public's reluctance to have a microchip embedded in the body - what Silverman has called "the creepy factor" - means the product won't be a slam dunk...

http://www.raidersnewsupdate.com/lead-story32.htm




Car Czar: Car data recorders threaten privacy

I am not a paranoid guy. Really, I'm not.

But what is happening under the front seat of my late-model sport-utility vehicle has me questioning whether or not I live in a country where the protection of civil liberties is still guaranteed by the Constitution.

What I have is called on-board data collection. And if you own a newer car, truck or SUV, chances are that your vehicle is spying on you. The automotive technology is actually very simple, and similar to the "black boxes" used on commercial aircraft. Typically situated under the driver's seat, the recorders installed on motor vehicles are designed to take what amounts to a snapshot of your driving habits and patterns just prior to a collision. And it's this snapshot that could ultimately become your worst enemy if you are involved in an accident.

Here's how it works: The instant your vehicle's computer recognizes that the air bag has deployed, the data recorder permanently locks in information about what was occurring just prior to the collision. The information can include your vehicle speed, whether you used the brakes, the engine revs, the gear that the transmission was in, the rate of deceleration and whether you or your passengers were wearing seat belts.

So what's the problem, you ask? Well, there's the fact that this information rarely is retained by the driver or the owner of the vehicle, but insurance companies and law enforcement can download this data from vehicles that have been towed to wrecking yards or impound lots.

Once quantified, the collected data can be used to help determine fault in an accident. Or it might be the basis to re-evaluate your risk category as an insured driver. General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co., Honda and Toyota freely admit to installing these recorders, but other automakers have been less forthcoming about technology they are installing to capture driving habits and conditions.

The big question remains: Is all of this legal? Like most things that are new and controversial, there's a lot of debate but no concrete answer. The courts are wrestling with the issue, but in-vehicle data has been cited as evidence against American drivers in legal proceedings. Call it the ultimate automotive betrayal.

However, there are those who firmly support on-board data collection. They say it provides accurate crash data as opposed to speculation from drivers and eyewitnesses. And they insist that motorists who have done nothing wrong in a crash have nothing to worry about.

So what to do? I believe it boils down to the issue of ownership. You own the vehicle, and in my opinion, you should own any and all information captured as a result of your driving it. This means that you need to protect that recorder no matter what!

If your car is involved in a collision, I would first deny anyone access to the vehicle for the purpose of downloading any on-board data. Make your desire clear to the impound lot or wrecking yard. If possible, immediately have a mechanic remove the device and keep it in a safe place. Obviously, if you are served with a warrant or a subpoena, you may be asked to surrender the recorder, although experts tell me that rarely has been the case.

My next step would be to consult a good attorney who is familiar with what ownership rights you may have with respect to the data in the recorder. In some cases, of course, the data could actually help you in a legal dispute by proving you were not at fault. But from my perspective, it should be your choice whether to make this information public. Or until the courts offer a definitive ruling on this new technology, you should at least have the right to argue that disclosure is your choice...

http://www.raidersnewsupdate.com/lead-story6.htm


Scannable humans complicate ideas of privacy

Scott Silverman, chief executive of Applied Digital Solutions Inc., is banking that a microchip in his upper right arm will bring the company vast riches one day.

For now, however, the implanted chip, approved in October by the Food and Drug Administration, is attracting more media queries and privacy concerns than cash. Silverman realizes it might take some time before the public comes around to his vision of a VeriChip in every arm, making personal, medical or financial information accessible with the wave of a wand.

"This is not an iPod," said Silverman, comparing the device, which is about the size of a large grain of rice, to the personal music player. "This will not happen next month, next year, or even over the next five, 15 or 20 years. But it will work into our culture and our lives. It will almost take on a life of its own."...

With fewer than 1,000 people "chipped," uses have ranged from the whimsical to deadly serious. In Barcelona, Spain, club-hoppers with the chip get instant entry to a bar's VIP room and can use the same chip to put drinks on their tab. In Mexico City, VeriChip gives the attorney general and his associates access to documents on top-secret drug investigations.

Silverman thinks VeriChips could become ubiquitous for critically ill or Alzheimer's disease patients, giving emergency room personnel instant access to life-saving medical information.

Used in tandem with door-mounted scanners, implanted chips could track the whereabouts of employees in high-security facilities like nuclear power plants or military bases. They could function in lieu of a credit card, with cashiers scanning the customer along with the groceries.

The FDA's approval of VeriChip for medical recordkeeping purposes last month opens the door to its use. But the public's reluctance to have a microchip embedded in the body - what Silverman has called "the creepy factor" - means the product won't be a slam dunk...

http://www.raidersnewsupdate.com/lead-story32.htm



Columbia: Biometric ATMs give bank cards the finger

Bank customers in Colombia now have the option of using their fingerprints to withdraw cash from ATM machines.

Colombia's Bancafe Bank has partnered with technology company NCR to upgrade its ATM machines and allow its 2.5 million customers the option of accessing their accounts and withdrawing money using just their fingerprints and a PIN number.

According to NCR around 50 percent of Bancafe Bank's customers have signed up for the scheme and the bank expects that figure to grow as it upgrades its entire network of ATMs.

Mark Grossi, NCR`s chief technology officer, said that biometric technology is now reliable and cheap enough to be used in a banking environment.

"The technology has now matured to a stage where it is sufficiently robust and affordable to meet the needs of specific markets. In the case of Bancafe, fingerprint scanning has enabled the bank to expand their customer base by offering customers the option of cardless transactions," said Grossi.

Nelson Sanchez, commercial director at Bancafe, said the fingerprint technology has attracted new customers to the bank `“ many of whom were previously reluctant to open an account...

http://www.raidersnewsupdate.com/lead-story37.htm


This is to show how our privercey is being threaterned.

Offline NOLAJBS

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Biometrix in Reuters
« Reply #1 on: December 09, 2004, 05:35:47 AM »
Since Congress passed the 9/11 Bill, we will soon be served biometric (national identification) driver's licenses.  

Thank You Mr/Mrs Senators/Congressmen!  :x
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