Author Topic: * Germany  (Read 11060 times)

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Offline Wulfgar

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« Reply #140 on: September 17, 2013, 05:27:01 PM »
She's dancing to somebody else's tune.  Doesn't matter if it's her or somebody else.  Whomever deviates from the program gets removed, one way or another.  For those who do as they're told, they enjoy financial rewards.  That's why it's fruitless to direct anger toward politicians.  Aim for the top - their masters, the bankers. 

Offline Rudi Jan

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« Reply #141 on: September 17, 2013, 06:49:35 PM »
She's dancing to somebody else's tune.  Doesn't matter if it's her or somebody else.  Whomever deviates from the program gets removed, one way or another.  For those who do as they're told, they enjoy financial rewards.  That's why it's fruitless to direct anger toward politicians.  Aim for the top - their masters, the bankers.

You're right. However I listen to a lot of talk radio and from what I understand all we need do assert our democratic values, elect the right people and believe in Jesus.
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Offline pope daniel

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« Reply #142 on: September 17, 2013, 10:29:17 PM »
believe in Jesus.

No, believing in Jesus + Good Works cannot save anyone. Matthew 7:22-23

Salvation is Censored In Protestant Bibles:

http://biblehub.com/acts/15-41.htm  "keep the precepts of the apostles and the ancients." is missing.

Therefore, it is only in the Catholic Church (not the whore of babylon vatican).


 
Revelation 3:14 "To the angel of the church in Laodicea write: These are the words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God's creation.

Offline Rudi Jan

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« Reply #143 on: September 17, 2013, 10:47:25 PM »
No, believing in Jesus + Good Works cannot save anyone. Matthew 7:22-23

Salvation is Censored In Protestant Bibles:

http://biblehub.com/acts/15-41.htm  "keep the precepts of the apostles and the ancients." is missing.

Therefore, it is only in the Catholic Church (not the whore of babylon vatican).

I was being facetious. I don't believe in jewish narratives. They are generally plagiarisms. Arguing about the details of falsehoods strikes me as rather futile.
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Offline Wulfgar

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« Reply #144 on: September 18, 2013, 04:30:23 AM »
You're right. However I listen to a lot of talk radio and from what I understand all we need do assert our democratic values, elect the right people and believe in Jesus.

Plus make calls to members of Congress.

Offline Rudi Jan

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« Reply #145 on: September 18, 2013, 07:33:28 AM »
Plus make calls to members of Congress.

That's especially important. You get to speak to a secretary who puts you on a list. Get on enough lists and you get special attention.
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Offline Rudi Jan

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‘Wealthy’ Germany brushing big issues under the carpet on eve of elections?
« Reply #146 on: September 21, 2013, 02:32:38 PM »
‘Wealthy’ Germany brushing big issues under the carpet on eve of elections?

Published time: September 21, 2013 11:25
Edited time: September 21, 2013 18:30
source: http://rt.com/news/germany-elections-economy-politics-151/


German Chancellor Angela Merkel (R) and chairman of the Christian Social Union of Bavaria (CSU), Horst Seehofer
attend an election campaign event of her German Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party in the southern German town
of Munich on September 20, 2013.(AFP Photo / Christof Stache)


On the eve of elections, Germans are concerned that mainstream political parties are not confronting the real issues facing Germany, as young people begin to shun traditional political voices in Europe’s biggest economy.

On the surface, life looks good in Germany. The country boasts one of the strongest economies in the world, thanks to a robust manufacturing sector. Unemployment is just 5.3 percent, down from 9.8 percent a decade ago.

“Today many people are better off than they were four years ago, in 2017 even more people can say: we are doing better in our country,” German Chancellor Angela Merkel said earlier this month, in anticipation of winning another term in office.

Peer Steinbrück, leader of the center-left Social Democrats and Merkel’s challenger, believes the upbeat statistics hide an underclass which is scraping by on low-paid jobs.

A lot of ordinary people have seen little benefit from Germany’s economic prosperity - the gap between rich and poor has grown remarkably over the past 15 years, Steinbrueck said earlier this month.

Many Germans are forced to make ends meet on just over US$1,000 per month, on a mix of unemployment benefits and salaries which can be as low as $2 an hour. Despite its wealth, Germany has resisted introducing a minimum wage policy despite numerous calls.

This is something that Steinbrück wants to change. The Social Democrats (SPD) are fighting to implement a national minimum wage of $11.20 per hour.

Polls show that the SPD is currently lagging behind Merkel’s governing Christian Democrat party (CDU) and its sister party, the Christian Social Union coalition (CSU). Most opinion polls put Merkel’s CDU-CSU coalition at around 40 percent, and Steinbrueck’s SPD at about 26 percent.


Chancellor candidate of German Social Democratic (SPD) party Peer Steinbrueck delivers his speech at an election
campaign event on September 20, 2013 in Kassel.(AFP Photo / Odd Andersen)


Coalition politics

With the almost certain prospect of Merkel having to form a coalition with either the pro-market Free Democrats or the Social Democrats, German business executives and financial institutions are backing Merkel as the most pro-business candidate.

Many business leaders believe that Merkel’s support for a financial transaction tax - unpopular with banks and financial intuitions - will wane after the election if Merkel continues a coalition with the current Christian Democrats.

But if Merkel is forced into a grand coalition with Social Democrats, many are worried that she will be forced to adopt their more left-wing agenda – including greater regulation for the financial sector and aiming to cap rents for Germany’s army of households that lease their properties.

The two heavyweight parties - the CDU and the SPD - have also been criticized for agreeing on too many issues, says RT’s Berlin correspondent Peter Oliver, who has been following events in the run up to the election.

Voters, particularly the younger ones, are concerned that nothing is being done about the NSA spying scandal. They want to know how much Merkel knew and whether she actually allowed the NSA to spy on German citizens.

Young voters are also irritated that politicians in the Bundestag – Germany’s parliament - are not listening to them and what they want.

“They want education, they want jobs. These wishes aren’t being addressed by the main parties,” Gero Neugebauer from the Free University of Berlin told RT.

In contrast to the image of the lucrative economic capital of Europe propagated by the mainstream media, many Germans are beginning to feel the pinch in the financial crisis.

“I think if you were to ask someone from Spain they would tell you Germany is an economic land of milk and honey, this just isn't the case,” said Christian Deubner from the Foundation of European Progressive Studies to RT.

With high-paid jobs thin on the ground and the absence of a minimum wage may Germans are struggling to stay afloat financially.

“I sat with my roommate we realize we make too little cash. It's a case of either we give up our studies and find more work, or we lose our flat,” an inhabitant of the city of Bochum told RT.

Although Steinbrück has accused Merkel in the past of hiding the true cost of bailing out Greece from German voters, he is not going to slam her too much publicly, as he knows there is a real possibility of having to sit down with her to hammer out a coalition after the votes have been counted.

In the immediate run up to the elections both politicians have refrained from broaching the issue of a third Greek bailout that is looking progressively more likely as Greece’s debt burden now exceeds 160 per cent of its GDP.

“It’s possible that there will be a new aid package for Greece. Nobody knows how big,” Merkel said in the televised debate at the beginning of September. However, she has also stressed the importance of maintaining reform pressure on the crisis-stricken country.

While the two main opponents are tiptoeing around each other on some of the biggest issues facing the country, Germany’s smaller and newer parties are seeing a renaissance.

The Alternative for Germany party (AFD), which is pushing a Eurosceptic agenda and wants tighter controls on immigration, may achieve the 5 percent minimum of votes required to gain a seat in the Bundestag.

“We are Eurosceptic with reference to the common currency, we have a number of other issues such as our energy policy or the instability of our social security system, issues of immigration and integration into Germany,” Bernard Lucke, the leader of the party, told RT.


Supporters of chancellor candidate of German Social Democratic (SPD) party Peer Steinbrueck listen to his speech
at an election campaign event on September 20, 2013 in Kassel. (AFP Photo / Odd Andersen)


Comic relief

And with Merkel’s current coalition partners - the Free Democrats - taking a hammering in the opinion polls, many voters are turning to the Alternative for Germany party.

Voter turnout is not predicted to be particularly high, and the main parties are tailoring their messages to key voters. The average German voter is 45 years old.

In a bid to capture the hearts and minds of Germany’s youth, several parties have come up with some unusual policies in the overall election campaign, which some have described as dull.

The Green Party, which holds around 10 percent of the vote, has suggested compulsory vegetarian days. Meanwhile, the Free Democrats want to make it illegal for trains to run late.

This, says the Alternative for Germany Party, is a classic distraction technique from parties who don’t want to tackle the real issues facing the country.

“When you talk about their [Social Democrats] support for the government’s decision to implement the [eurozone’s new permanent rescue fund] ESM, to initiate further payments for Greece, they all said, ‘yes, yes, yes.’ There is no real opposition in parliament,” Hugh Bronson, an election candidate for the Alternative for Germany party, told RT.

Then there is the simply named ‘Party,’ whose members have decided they are going to do the opposite of what political parties usually do – as well as throw all tourists out of Berlin and build a wall around Germany. The party has said it expects to get over 100 percent of the vote.

“We want to get to power and then we are going to decide what we are going to do with it,” Martin Sonneborn, leader of the Party, told RT.

This is most likely what Merkel herself will have to do, says Oliver.

“It does seem that after the votes have been cast, the real political wrangling will start when it comes to forming a new coalition in Germany,” he said.

RW - All 'democracies' need a rule of oblivion - if less than half the people vote the government should cease to be. Some day, when enlightenment prevails government will be dispensed with in any case. The rule of oblivion would let those nations that are ahead of the curve move forward unencumbered by the stasis of the ignorant.
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Offline Sue

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« Reply #147 on: September 21, 2013, 03:11:25 PM »
Quote
“We want to get to power and then we are going to decide what we are going to do with it,” Martin Sonneborn, leader of the Party, told RT.

Now that is a new one for me.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Rudi Jan

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Merkel’s party wins German election with 41.5%, no absolute majority – official results

Published time: September 22, 2013 16:07
Edited time: September 23, 2013 00:42
source: http://rt.com/news/german-election-merkel-party-206/


German Chancellor Angela Merkel and CDU secretary general Hermann Groehe celebrate at the Christian Democratic
Union (CDU) party's headquarters in Berlin on September 22, 2013, after the German general elections (AFP Photo)


Angela Merkel’s bloc (CDU-CSU) has won the German election with 41.5 percent of the votes. The conservatives beat their main rival, the Social Democrats (SPD), which received 25.7 percent of the votes, according to preliminary final results.

Merkel secured herself a third term and led the conservatives to their best result in more than 20 years. However, the CDU's junior coalition allies - the pro-business Free Democrats (FDP) - received only 4.8 percent, which is below the five percent threshold required to gain a seat in parliament.

Germany's Left party, which aims for democratic socialism, came in third with 8.6 percent, while the Greens got 8.4 percent. The Alternative for Germany (AfD) party, which campaigned on eurosceptic fears about the cost of eurozone bailouts, came in with 4.7 percent. The Pirate party, advocating for internet freedom and copyright law reform, ended up with 2.2 percent and the far-right nationalist NDP party received 1.3 percent. All other parties received a collective 2.7 percent of the votes.

Merkel has urged her bloc to celebrate after leading her conservatives to their best result in over 20 years.

"We will do everything we can in the next four years to make them successful ones for Germany," she said at the CDU headquarters adding that it was too early to consider coalitions. "We will talk about this tomorrow when we know the final results - but we can surely celebrate tonight, as we have done a great job." 


Supporters of the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) celebrate as exit polls are broadcast on television in Berlin on
September 22, 2013, after the German general elections. (AFP Photo / Odd Andersen)


Seventy-two percent of German voters have turned out to the polls.

Having not won an absolute majority, Merkel’s CDU-CSU party may be forced into talks with Steinbrueck’s SPD – which Merkel worked alongside between 2005 and 2009. This may mean she is forced to adopt more leftist policies such as a national minimum wage, which is being heavily campaigned for by the SPD.

Although Germany has a minimum wage set for certain jobs - such as cleaners and construction workers - there is no national minimum wage. Merkel opposes Steinbrueck’s plans and prefers to let employers and employees decide on minimum pay on a sector-by-sector, region-by-region basis.

RT’s correspondent in Berlin, Peter Oliver, says that a grand coalition between Merkel and the SPD is unlikely as the SPD have said it “just doesn’t sit with them.”


(L-R) North Rhine-Westphalia's CDU leader Armin Laschet, German Labour Minister Ursula von der Leyen,
Baden-Wuerttemberg's CDU leader Thomas Strobl, CSU parliamentary group leader Gerda Hasselfeldt,
German Chancellor Angela Merkel, CDU secretary general Hermann Groehe and CDU/CSU parliamentary
group leader Volker Kauder celebrate on the stage at the Christian Democratic Union (CDU) party's
headquarters after exit polls were published in Berlin on September 22, 2013
(AFP Photo / Odd Andersen)


Political commentators and the voters themselves - particularly the younger ones - have been highly critical of the whole election campaign, claiming it has not addressed the real issues facing Germany.

In contrast to Germany’s economic powerhouse image broadcast by mainstream media, many Germans are feeling the heat of the economic crisis. While unemployment might be comparatively low, many people are scraping by on low wages.

“I think if you ask someone from Spain, they would tell you that Germany is an economic land of milk and honey. This just isn’t the case,” Christian Deubner from the Foundation of European Progressive Studies told RT.

There is also frustration among the electorate about a possible new bailout for Greece, along with the NSA spying scandal which tarnished Merkel’s image.


German Chancellor Angela Merkel drinks a glass of vine during the election party of her Christian Democratic Union
(CDU) party at the party's headquarters in Berlin on September 22, 2013 (AFP Photo)


RW - 41.5% of 72% of the German people, and that by virtue of two coalition parties. Wow, a 29.88% majority. Democracy, what a concept. Let's not even ask how many of those who voted are employed by the government.

On a side note, Hitler got 98% of the vote at a time when everyone voted and he was dubbed a dictator.
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Offline laconas

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« Reply #149 on: September 22, 2013, 05:37:07 PM »
Quote
On a side note, Hitler got 98% of the vote at a time when everyone voted and he was dubbed a dictator.

They said on TV they voted out of fear--Assad and Putin too.
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Offline Rudi Jan

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« Reply #150 on: September 22, 2013, 06:12:16 PM »
They said on TV they voted out of fear--Assad and Putin too.

By that criteria Merkel is not so scary.  ::)
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Offline laconas

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« Reply #151 on: September 22, 2013, 06:45:02 PM »
It's all so crazy--the East Germans who grew-up as eastgermaners somehow ended up being the rulers of Germany.
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Offline Rudi Jan

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TV: German Extremist Teenagers Fighting in Syria
« Reply #152 on: October 24, 2013, 11:08:05 AM »
TV: German Extremist Teenagers Fighting in Syria

Thu Oct 24, 2013 3:9
source: http://english.farsnews.com/newstext.aspx?nn=13920802000157



TEHRAN (FNA)- Male and female European extremist teenagers who adhere to militant groups’ ideology have departed from Germany and Norway for Syria to wage war against President Bashar Assad’s government, reports said.

Second German Television (ZDF) broadcast a report that adolescents – including a German Muslim as young as 15 – traveled to Syria to fight against Assad’s government, Al-Alam reported.

A "German camp" was created in Syria to recruit extremists, with an estimated 200 German militants involved, some of whom are in Syria or on their way to the Middle Eastern country, according to German intelligence.

Der Spiegel news magazine also reported that around 200 are now in the "German Camp" or on their way there, taking a now well-worn route from Germany to Istanbul and through to the Syrian border.

The Welt newspaper also said that German security services are increasingly concerned about the number of militants heading to Syria from Europe.

They fear that the extremist figures will return to Germany more radicalized after potentially receiving terror training from Al-Qaeda and other foreign backed militant groups in the country.

In September, Germany's domestic spy chief Hans-Georg Maassen estimated the number of German extremists in the country at 170 and said 50 had travelled in recent months.

RW - So what kind of extremism do these young men practice in Europe? It certainly can't be anything that promotes white culture. It's really sickening to have the MSM call these militants whose only concern is for their fanatacism for the middle east 'Europeans'. That's a joke. These characters are no more European than are eskimos.
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Offline Rudi Jan

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Jews are 'our big brothers,' Pope says at Kristallnacht commemoration
« Reply #153 on: November 10, 2013, 03:12:33 PM »
Jews are 'our big brothers,' Pope says at Kristallnacht commemoration

By Reuters   and The Associated Press   | Nov. 10, 2013 | 4:39 PM | 2
source: http://www.haaretz.com/jewish-world/jewish-world-news/1.557283

Obama, Merkel and thousands of ordinary Germans among those commemorating the 75th anniversary of the 1938 pogrom.
      

Kristallnacht
A Bruenn JR shop, a Jewish-run store after it has been vandalized by Nazis and its frontwall inscripted with anti-Semitic graffiti after Kristallnacht. Photo by AFP


Pope Francis commemorated Kristallnacht at a mass in front of thousands of people in St. Peter's Square on Sunday, describing the Jewish people as the "big brothers" of his Roman Catholic flock.


Riots organized by German authorities on November 9-10, 1938 killed 91 Jews and destroyed 267 synagogues. The rioting was followed by the deportation of 30,000 Jews to concentration camps.

The attacks, which came to be known as the Night of Broken Glass (Kristallnacht) anticipated the mass slaughter of European Jewry launched three years later.

Kristallnacht marked a step towards the Holocaust and should not be forgotten, the pope said: "We renew our closeness and solidarity to the Jewish people, our big brothers, and pray to God that the memory of the past and of the sins of the past helps us to be always vigilant against every form of hate and intolerance."

Pope Francis, who co-authored a book on inter-faith dialogue with Rabbi Abraham Skorka of Argentina while he was archbishop of Buenos Aires, has pledged good relations with Jews. His election last March was welcomed by the world's Jewish associations.

Obama: 'The tragic consequences of silence'

In the United States, President Barack Obama said that the lesson of Kristallnacht was to speak out “against anti-Semitism and intolerance.” In a statement marking the 75th anniversary of the pogrom, the president said that “Kristallnacht foreshadowed the systematic slaughter of six million Jews and millions of other innocent victims."

Seventy-five years later, Obama said, Kristallnacht "now signifies the tragic consequences of silence in the face of unmitigated hatred. As we mark this anniversary, let us act in keeping with the lessons of that dark night by speaking out against anti-Semitism and intolerance, standing up to indifference, and recommitting ourselves to combating prejudice and persecution wherever it exists.”

Kristallnacht was commemorated in Germany with candle-light vigils in many cities and towns. People listened to Jewish survivors share memories and met at Jewish cemeteries to remember the victims of the pogrom.

German Chancellor Angela Merkel said Kristallnacht "was an event that humiliated Jews in an unbelievable way ... a real low point in German history had been reached."

She added, "Unfortunately, later on German history developed in an even more dramatic way which eventually ended in the Shoah (Holocaust.)" The chancellor also called on Germans to never forget the past.

Across Berlin, guided groups of residents walked through their neighborhoods, noting sites where Jewish stores, schools and other locations once stood before being destroyed by the Nazis and their supporters.

RW - The Pope is a disgusting toad who should be more careful about declaring who HIS big brothers are. I'm quite sure a great number of catholics would have a say on such a sycophantic claim of kinship.

And why are all the windows in that store intact?


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Offline dominique

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- Jews are 'our big brothers,' Pope says at Kristallnacht commemoration
« Reply #154 on: November 10, 2013, 04:08:56 PM »

And why are all the windows in that store intact?

And I'll bet the "graffiti" was the wash-off kind, too.
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Offline laconas

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- Jews are 'our big brothers,' Pope says at Kristallnacht commemoration
« Reply #155 on: November 10, 2013, 07:17:56 PM »
And I'll bet the "graffiti" was the wash-off kind, too.

The Nazis were bastards--they claimed the Jews vandalized their own stores, they then withheld insurance payments, and even fined them for making false insurance claims. If that isn't anti-Semitism I don't know what is?
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Offline Wulfgar

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- Jews are 'our big brothers,' Pope says at Kristallnacht commemoration
« Reply #156 on: November 11, 2013, 05:26:51 AM »
The Nazis were bastards--they claimed the Jews vandalized their own stores, they then withheld insurance payments, and even fined them for making false insurance claims. If that isn't anti-Semitism I don't know what is?

That's the blueprint that Larry Silverstein & Frank Lowy used for the WTC.  The difference being that insurance DID get paid out.  :P

Offline laconas

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- Jews are 'our big brothers,' Pope says at Kristallnacht commemoration
« Reply #157 on: November 11, 2013, 01:46:08 PM »
That's the blueprint that Larry Silverstein & Frank Lowy used for the WTC.  The difference being that insurance DID get paid out.  :P

Only Nazis would try to stop the insurance payments to Larry.
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Dozens of police injured as eviction protest turns violent in Hamburg
« Reply #158 on: December 22, 2013, 10:57:32 AM »
Dozens of police injured as eviction protest turns violent in Hamburg

Published time: December 22, 2013 15:33
Edited time: December 22, 2013 16:17
source: http://rt.com/news/hamburg-rote-flora-clashes-635/


German police use water cannons to clear a street during clashes in front of the 'Rote Flora' cultural centre during a
demonstration in Hamburg, December 21, 2013.(Reuters / Morris Mac Matzen)


Hamburg residents have clashed with police in what is the most violent protest in years, with scores injured, after more than 7,000 took to the streets to protest plans to evict squatters from an old theater building, which is a leftist cultural center.

Police and protesters give conflicting figures, putting the number of participants anywhere from 7,000 to 10,000 people, with more than 100 policemen and a yet unspecified number of protesters injured in Saturday’s civil unrest.

Police said that some 4,000 of the protesters were from extreme left-wing groups. The violence involved stone and bottle-throwing, firecrackers and smoke bombs. Police responded with pepper spray and water cannon.

What eventually led to an explosion in violence was caused by the sale of the left-wing Rote Flora cultural center by local authorities to a developer. Some squatters have been occupying the premises for 20 years now.


Overview shows German police as they block protesters on a cross road following clashes in front of the 'Rote Flora'
cultural centre during a demonstration in Hamburg, December 21, 2013.(Reuters / Morris Mac Matzen)


It is said that an escalation took place soon after the beginning of the event in the afternoon, when some protesters started attacking police officers, although the atmosphere at the start was more peaceful and even festive, with confetti everywhere, as well as families seen with children.

All the while, the thousands of protesters shouted that “the city belongs to everyone,” one of their main slogans.

But as the rally in front of the Rote Flora got going, police showed up to clear away people with batons and a water cannon, their spokesman telling Deutsche Welle that “there was a mood of aggression from the outset,” adding that “we came under serious attack. It has become more violent than anything we have experienced in a long time.”

“Through the overwhelming use of batons, pepper spray and water cannon, there were numerous injuries,” said the organizers.


German police is attacked with fireworks during clashes in front of the 'Rote Flora' cultural centre during a demonstration
in Hamburg, December 21, 2013. (Reuters / Morris Mac Matzen)


Those suspected of being the initial trouble-makers have been arrested – there were over 20 detentions on suspicion of breaching the peace.

The streets afterwards showed signs of much chaos, with police cars smashed along with various buildings, including the office of the Social Democrat party. There were broken glass fragments and road signs having been folded over as well as stones literally torn from the pavement to be used as weapons.


A German riot police officer uses his baton during clashes in front of the 'Rote Flora' cultural centre during a
demonstration in Hamburg, December 21, 2013.(Reuters / Morris Mac Matzen)


Zeit Online has reported, citing a non-government organization, that about 500 protesters being injured, 20 of them seriously. However, this information cannot be independently verified.

The cultural center’s squatting history dates back to 1989, when the Schanzenviertel area’s Rote Flora center was first occupied. Since then, its reputation as the central point for leftist rallying has been further cemented.

But the public anger itself had also to do with the wider issue of migrant and refugee rights, including those of the squatters at a run-down apartment block in Hamburg’s Reeperbahn area – also the city’s red-light district, which contains the so-called Esso Houses. The buildings, also often home to Germany’s Lampedusa refugees, were evacuated last weekend because of their poor condition.

After the initial chaos at the Rote Flora had subsided, the crowds migrated toward the Reeperbahn, where they were chased around the streets by the police.


Protesters hold up a banner during clashes in front of the 'Rote Flora' cultural centre during a demonstration in Hamburg,
December 21, 2013. (Reuters / Morris Mac Matzen)



German police use water cannons to clear a street following clashes in front of the 'Rote Flora' cultural centre during
a demonstration in Hamburg, December 21, 2013.(Reuters / Morris Mac Matzen)
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Offline Rudi Jan

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Poverty in Germany Hits New High
« Reply #159 on: January 06, 2014, 08:30:26 PM »
Poverty in Germany Hits New High

Mon Jan 06, 2014 5:34
source: http://english.farsnews.com/newstext.aspx?nn=13921016001342



TEHRAN (FNA)- Germany suffers a deep economic and social crisis, despite official propaganda that Germany has remained largely unaffected by the global economic crisis and is a haven of prosperity in Europe, a report said.

A few days before the Christmas holidays, the Joint Welfare Association published a report on the regional development of poverty in Germany in 2013, World Socialist Web Site reported.

According to the report, poverty in Germany has “reached a sad record high”. Entire cities and regions have been plunged into ever deeper economic and social crisis. “The social and regional centrifugal forces, as measured by the spread of incomes, have increased dramatically in Germany since 2006,” it said. Germany faces “a test to breaking point”.

“All the positive trends of recent years have come to a standstill or have reversed. Germany has never been as divided as it is today,” said Ulrich Schneider, executive director of the Joint Welfare Association at the launch of the report.

The Association explicitly contradicts the presentation of the German government, which argues that poverty has remained steady since 2005 and is even declining. In its Poverty and Wealth Report in spring 2013, the government used a German Institute for Economic Research (DIW) study from October 2012. However, it concealed the fact that the DIW had only used data ranging up to 2010, which showed a marginal decline in the poverty rate compared to 2009.

In 2011, however, “the poverty rate rose again by leaps and bounds, exceeding the 15 percent mark for the first time”. The Joint Welfare Association also indirectly criticises the DIW, saying that up-to-date “figures were certainly available in October 2012”. In its study, the pro-business DIW apparently preferred to give the government an easy ride, avoiding negative publicity for its campaign in the 2013 general election.

The Joint Welfare Association poverty report for 2013 finds a “very clear pattern of increasing poverty for the Federal Republic of Germany. From 2006 to 2012, poverty grew successively from 14 percent to a peak of 15.2 percent. This trend only slowed down slightly in 2010, but did not stop, let alone reverse.”

The report calculates “relative poverty rates”, or the risk of poverty, defined as having income 60 percent below the average. In 2012, this poverty threshold was €869 monthly for a single household, and €1,826 for a family of four with two children under the age of 14.
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu