Author Topic: FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants  (Read 1162 times)

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Offline Rudi Jan

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FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« on: July 26, 2013, 04:03:48 PM »
FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants

Published time: July 26, 2013 20:19
source: http://rt.com/usa/fbi-drones-over-usa-653/


The Triton unmanned aircraft system.(Reuters / Bob Brown)

The Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) says it has used drones for domestic surveillance purposes in the United States at least ten times without obtaining warrants. In three additional cases, drones were authorized but “not actually used.”

Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) on Thursday published a letter from FBI Assistant Director Stephen D. Kelly, who admitted that the agency used unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) domestically, without gathering any warrants.

“The FBI uses UAVs in very limited circumstances to conduct surveillance when there is a specific, operational need,” the letter reads. “Since late 2006, the FBI has conducted surveillance using UAVs in eight criminal cases and two national security cases.”

The bureau said that it would only be required to obtain a warrant to use a drone in cases for which a person “would have a reasonable expectation of privacy.” The FBI stated that it has not yet needed to ask for a warrant, but that all requests for drone use must be reviewed by an agency lawyer and approved by a senior management official.

The agency said that one of the cases involved the rescue of a five-year-old boy who was being held hostage in an underground bunker. The information strongly suggests that the agency was referring to the Alabama hostage crisis in which a retired truck driver kidnapped a boy from a school bus and held him hostage for six days.

Drone usage was also authorized in three additional cases, but the FBI did not release details about the nature of those circumstances.

Sen. Paul has long advocated against domestic drone usage, and in March held up CIA Director John Brennan’s nomination for nearly 13 hours, due to his history of defending drone strikes. In June, FBI Director Robert Mueller admitted that his agency uses drones to spy on US citizens without any “operational guidelines.” Since Mueller's announcement, Paul has sent a series of open letters to the FBI, requesting detailed information about its use of drones in the United States.

In his second letter, mailed July 9, Paul threatened to filibuster the confirmation hearing for James Comey, Mueller’s successor, if he didn’t receive a response. This week, Paul finally received the information he sought.

But Paul was discontent with part of the agency’s response. In a follow-up letter addressed to Mueller, he expressed concern about the FBI’s ability to use drones without a warrant in cases where there is no “reasonable expectation of privacy.”  He said the clause could result in “an over-broad interpretation of this protection,” and asked the FBI to clarify what would require a warrant.

Sen. Paul also took his concerns to Twitter, telling his followers that “spying without warrants is unconstitutional.”

Overall, confirmation of the FBI’s drone use might be cause for concern among privacy advocates and anti-drone activists. Dave Norris, a councilman of Charlottesville, Va., predicted last February that drone use would occur domestically, and feared that there would be room for abuse.

“To me, it’s Big Brother in the sky,” he told the New York Times. “I don’t mean to sound conspiratorial about it, but these drones are coming, and we need to put some safeguards in place so they are not abused.”

RW - 'must be reviewed by an agency lawyer and approved by a senior management official' - well, that's ok then...
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Offline dominique

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #1 on: July 27, 2013, 09:07:48 AM »
IRS, NSA, FBI, CIA.... any alphabet-soup agencies left out yet, in regard to being utterly embroiled in scandalous behavior? What a shocker.
"Divert, distort, denigrate, disrupt or destroy any discussion of the corruption of American liberty by the organized lobby of a foreign power."  ~ WindRiverShoshoni

Offline dominique

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« Reply #2 on: July 27, 2013, 09:15:58 AM »
must be reviewed by an agency lawyer and approved by a senior management official.

This is sorta like the FISA court OK-ing warrentless wiretapping - AFTER THE FACT, even. As long as some other body of Big.Gov approves, everything is A-OK.  ::)
"Divert, distort, denigrate, disrupt or destroy any discussion of the corruption of American liberty by the organized lobby of a foreign power."  ~ WindRiverShoshoni

Offline Wulfgar

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #3 on: July 27, 2013, 09:23:10 AM »
Like any city, we've got this local free entertainment rag.
http://artvoice.com/

People get to for concert listings and such.  As you might expect, the staff is liberal and they have contributions from one of the local Jew college professors.  He laid low for a while, after an obnoxiou column, slamming Ron Paul supporters.  Then returned to whine incessantly about bullying.

Anyway...

The right/left paradigm tends not to draw me in, but I have shared my thoughts with those of various bends, when they're willing to listen.  After the rollout of the "War on Terror," it was my firm belief that it wouldn't make a difference who was in the White House, it would continue.  So, basically, Obama is no different from Bush. 

You'd never know that from this rag though.  They'll heap praise for efforts about gay marriage, illegal immigration, gun control, ObamaCare and the usual hot button issues in the so-called "cultural wars."

What you will never see is anything linking Obama to drone strikes, hollow tip bullet acquistions or doors being kicked down without warrants.  Granted, it's not my point to single out the president for criticism.  He's only a figurehead.  This whole charade of making it out to be an ideological pissing contest really has to be exposed. 

They expect liberal zealots to circle the wagons when they can pin the Republicans as "the war party" and blame "right wingers" for taking away their civil liberties.  Like how Christian Zionists never seem to figure out who's behind cultural degradation and all the liberal social issues being pushed forward, the cultural left never sees Jew fingerprints on the economic collapsing and erosion of rights.

Offline Rudi Jan

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #4 on: July 27, 2013, 11:09:14 AM »
This whole charade of making it out to be an ideological pissing contest really has to be exposed. 

That dialectic has been exposed for what it was when it got started in France by Frederic Bastiat. But it was just too good a scam to bury there and then. It's been a 'reality' ever since.

Kinda like that mad magazine cartoon: Spy vs Spy or Left vs Right, Liberal vs Conservative, Good vs Evil, and on and on. It seems to be the natural tendency of people to prefer polarization to balance.

One can expose things day in and day out but unless people look no one sees a thing.
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu

Offline Wulfgar

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #5 on: July 27, 2013, 12:43:24 PM »
That dialectic has been exposed for what it was when it got started in France by Frederic Bastiat. But it was just too good a scam to bury there and then. It's been a 'reality' ever since.

Kinda like that mad magazine cartoon: Spy vs Spy or Left vs Right, Liberal vs Conservative, Good vs Evil, and on and on. It seems to be the natural tendency of people to prefer polarization to balance.

One can expose things day in and day out but unless people look no one sees a thing.

That's the thing, you can lead a horse to water...

My eyes glaze over, reading the comments section in Huffington Post articles.  Some of the posts are from shills, but there is no shortage of fools who see everything as Democrat vs. Republican, Liberal vs. Conservative.

Offline Rudi Jan

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #6 on: July 27, 2013, 02:08:43 PM »
My eyes glaze over, reading the comments section in Huffington Post articles.  Some of the posts are from shills, but there is no shortage of fools who see everything as Democrat vs. Republican, Liberal vs. Conservative.

I know... it's hard to find anything worth watching or reading without rolling your eyes or worse, talking to your self out loud. If I wasn't single already I would be in a hurry.   :(
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu

Offline Rudi Jan

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #7 on: July 27, 2013, 02:30:36 PM »
US approves drones for civilian use

Published time: July 27, 2013 18:08
Edited time: July 27, 2013 18:50
source: http://rt.com/usa/us-drones-civilian-use-685/


AFP Photo / Don Emmert

The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has issued certificates for two types of unmanned aircraft for civilian use. The move is expected to lead to the first approved commercial drone operation later this summer.

The two unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) are the Scan Eagle X200 and Aero Vironment’s PUMA. They both measure around 4 ½ feet long, weighing less than 55 pounds, and have a wing span of ten and nine feet respectively.

Both the Scan Eagle and the PUMA received “restricted category type certificates”which permit aerial surveillance. Prior to the FAA’s decision, the only way the private sector could operate UAS in US airspace was by obtaining an experimental airworthiness certificate which specifically restricts commercial operations.

The PUMA is expected to support emergency response crews for wildlife surveillance and oil spill monitoring over the Beaufort Sea to the north of Canada and Alaska. The Scan Eagle will be used by a major energy company off the Alaskan Coast to survey ice floes and migrating whales in Arctic oil exploration areas.

The issuing of the certificates is seen as an important step to integrating UAS into US airspace. Both drone operations will meet the requirements of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, which includes a mandate to increase Arctic UAS commercial operations.

Most non-military use of drones in the US has so far been limited to the police and other government agencies. New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg said in March that drones will soon be used by the NYPD and will become as ubiquitous as security cameras.

Documents released by the American civil Liberties Union (ACLU) via the Freedom of Information Act have revealed that the US Marshals Service has also experimented with the use of drones for domestic surveillance.

Military drones are used extensively by the US Air Force for targeting terrorist suspects in several countries, including Afghanistan, Pakistan, and Yemen.

The strikes have been highly controversial, as they are ordered without the knowledge or participation of the countries concerned, and are sometimes inaccurate and kill civilians.

Pakistan’s relations with the US have been soured because of drone strikes. Just last month, the new government in Islamabad summoned a top US envoy who was given a letter of protest against drone strikes by the US military.

In May, a Pakistani court ruled that US drone strikes in its tribal regions should be considered war crimes, and that the government should use force to protect its civilians.

RW - Agency trumps the constitution any day of the week.
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Offline laconas

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- FBI admits to flying drones over US without warrants
« Reply #8 on: July 27, 2013, 05:42:19 PM »
American hillbillies are getting ready for some target practice.



FAA warns shooting at drone could result in prosecution similar to shooting at manned airplane
Published July 20, 2013
FoxNews.com

People who fire guns at drones are endangering the public and property and could be prosecuted or fined, the Federal Aviation Administration warned Friday.

The FAA released a statement in response to questions about an ordinance under consideration in the tiny farming community of Deer Trail, Colo., that would encourage hunters to shoot down drowns. The administration reminded the public that it regulates the nation's airspace, including the airspace over cities and towns.

"I want to take a stand against the coming surveillance society that seems to be rushing in on us," Phillip Steel, a resident in town who drafted the ordinance and submitted it for approval by the town board, told "Fox and Friends."

Officials in the town admit they have never seen a drone plane on the Eastern Plains, but they want to make a statement that they think using unmanned surveillance planes to spy on people in the United States is wrong. They say the ordinance is mostly symbolic. They also recognize it's against federal law to destroy federal property.

The FAA for its part said a drone "hit by gunfire could crash, causing damage to persons or property on the ground, or it could collide with other objects in the air. Shooting at an unmanned aircraft could result in criminal or civil liability, just as would firing at a manned airplane."

Under the proposed ordinance, Deer Trail would grant hunting permits to shoot drones. The permits would cost $25 each. The town would also encourage drone hunting by awarding $100 to anyone who presents a valid hunting license and identifiable pieces of a drone that has been shot down.

AIR FORCE DRONE CRASHES, CLOSES FLORIDA ROAD

Steel, 48, said in an interview that he has 28 signatures on a petition — roughly 10 percent of the town's registered voters. Under Colorado law, that requires local officials to formally consider the proposal at a meeting next month. Town officials would then have the option of adopting the ordinance or putting it on the ballot in an election this fall, he said.

The proposed ordinance is mostly a symbolic protest against small, civilian drones that are coming into use in the United States, Steel said. He acknowledged that it's unlikely there are any drones in use near Deer Trail.

The head of the Federal Bureau of Investigation acknowledged in June that his agency uses drones to conduct surveillance in the United States, but said they do so rarely, The Wall Street Journal reported . FBI director Robert Mueller said the agency uses them "in a very, very minimal way, very seldom."

Federal agencies have been using drones for years to monitor the northern and southern borders of the U.S., and those drones have occasionally been deployed to help domestic law-enforcement agencies like the FBI.

Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/us/2013/07/20/faa-warns-shooting-at-drone-could-result-in-prosecution-similar-to-shooting-at/#ixzz2aIgrTvdn
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