Author Topic: * Was Christopher Columbus a Jew?  (Read 3063 times)

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Offline Sue

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* Was Christopher Columbus a Jew?
« on: February 26, 2013, 03:54:36 PM »


Posted by Rob Eshman ~ Source

     On March 31, 1492 the Edict of Expulsion (also called the Alhambra Decree) Every Jew in Spain was forced to choose between conversion to Christianity or leaving the country forever leaving their possessions behind.  150,000 Jews left Spain, many went to Portugal where they received a short welcome before being asked to convert, die or leave as in Spain.

    On July 31, 1492 (7th of Av), the last Jew left Spain.  Columbus sailed on August 3, 1492.  He did insist that all of his crew be onboard August 2nd.

    His historic voyage was financed by wealthy and influential Jews-many themselves converts-rather than a magnanimous King and Queen of Spain.

    Columbus’s voyage was not financed by Isabella selling her jewels as is often stated. The major financiers were two court officials – both Jewish conversos – Louis de Santangel, chancellor of the royal household, and Gabriel Sanchez, treasurer of Aragon.

    The Jews in Spain became the target of pogroms and religious per-secution. Many were forced to renounce Judaism and embrace Catholicism. These were known as Conversos, or converts.

    In response to a petition to Rome to introduce the Inquisition and find a final solution to their Jewish Problem, in 1487 Spain obtained a Papal Bull. The introduction of the Inquisition was motivated by the greed of King Ferdinand attempting to seize all the power and wealth in Spain. It was an instrument of avarice and political absolutism. Four years later tens of thousands of Jews, Marranos, and even Conversos were suffering under the Spanish Inquisition.  According to the Christians of the day, Jews were considered “Infidels” (Sound familiar?)

    As Spain and Portugal was killing and expelling the Jewish people, Turkey had accepted the Chosen people of G-d and was rewarded.  Spain and Portugal’s economies declined, while the Ottoman Empire became one of the greatest powers in the world. The next two sultans, Selim I and Suleiman I, expanded the empire as far as Vienna, Austria.

    God had given Abraham and his descendants a special blessing:

    “I will bless those who bless you, and curse those who curse you, and through you, will be blessed all the families of the earth.” (Genesis 12:3)

    Christopher Columbus may or may not have been a Jew, but he paved the way for a country that would be accepting of the Jewish people, and keeping with G-d’s blessing, has been a nation abundant in liberty, wealth, and opportunity for all people.

    Several sites explain the evidence and possibilites.  Check them out!  Just do a google search

    Happy Columbus day all!

Meanwhile, over at Beliefnet.org, Rabbi Brad Hirschfield asks, “Why does it matter?”:

    Beyond the pride which many Jews feel at being able to claim Columbus as a Member of the Tribe, there are real lessons to be learned from his story - spiritual lessons which can help all of us on our own journeys, even if they are not as historic.

    First, if any of the stories of Columbus’ Jewishness are accurate, they remind us that we can be many things at the same time, and that having those multiple, even conflicting, identities can be a real advantage under certain circumstances. Columbus, according to the Jewish versions of his biography was a Catholic-Jewish-Spanish-Italian, and in all likelihood it was being all of those things at the same time which positioned him to be who he was. His boundary crossing identity was certainly pivotal historically, and probably psychologically, in propelling him toward a life of boundary-crossing.

    Second, if there really was a connection between his decision to set sail in August 1492 and that day being on or about Tisha B’Av, the ninth day of the Hebrew month of Av (a day classically associated with destruction and bad fortune for Jews), he figured out how to turn a tragedy into a triumph. That’s no small spiritual lesson for any of us.

    Third, while the implications of his “discovering” the New World would takes generations to unfold, the shores upon which Columbus landed would turn out to be the healthiest, safest and most vibrant Jewish Diaspora communities in the history of the Jewish people. Columbus’ journey, like most of ours’ could not be fully appreciated within the context of his own time. He planted seeds which would take years to bear fruit. I hope that among the things people celebrate today is the fact that our own lives are like that as well.

    Whoever Christopher Columbus was, and however he is remembered, this much we know: he was a boundary crossing explorer who drew on multiple identities and traditions in ways that empowered him to take incredible chances when others would not, see remarkable opportunities where others could not, and accomplish things big enough that their full implications were beyond anyone’s understanding. That is the stuff of spiritual greatness

Read the history of Christopher Columbus who was a thief and a killer of the Indians who he enslaved and murdered. I suggest a reading of Howard Zinn’s A Peoples History of the United States and after reading the true history of Columbus one should be embarrassed to claim any connection with him.

http://www.historyisaweapon.com/zinnapeopleshistory.html



Was Columbus secretly Jewish? Historians argue explorer's epic voyage was to establish new homeland for his people as they escaped the Spanish Inquisition

    Scholars believe Columbus was a 'Marrano', a secret Jew who feigned conversion to Catholicism
    Historians say five clues to the explorer's true faith can be found in his last will and testament
    New theory suggests he was looking for a safe haven for the Jews persecuted and driven out of Spain
    He was described as a 'deeply religious' man who was committed to the cause of liberating Israel's Holy Land

    By Kerry Mcqueeney

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2147558/Christopher-Columbus-Jewish-looking-new-homeland-discovered-America-historians-say.html#ixzz2M3XjB67H
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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- * Was Christopher Columbus a Jew?
« Reply #1 on: February 26, 2013, 08:34:23 PM »
Well, we know for sure the Italian States of Florence, Venice, and Genoa(I posted a piece here how Florence welcomed the Spanish Jews a little while ago) welcomed the Jews after they left Spain. The riches of the America's at the time were too great to keep Jews from not becoming cryptos, so, even though we may not 100% certain Columbus was a crypto, we are 100% certain cryptos were involved in the plunder and later in the slave trade.
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Offline Sue

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« Reply #2 on: February 26, 2013, 10:59:34 PM »
Well, we know for sure the Italian States of Florence, Venice, and Genoa(I posted a piece here how Florence welcomed the Spanish Jews a little while ago) welcomed the Jews after they left Spain. The riches of the America's at the time were too great to keep Jews from not becoming cryptos, so, even though we may not 100% certain Columbus was a crypto, we are 100% certain cryptos were involved in the plunder and later in the slave trade.

We will never know for sure, but there is a good chance that Columbus was one. I would assume that 'they' would prefer to finance one of their own.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline OldTimes

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- * Was Christopher Columbus a Jew?
« Reply #3 on: February 27, 2013, 01:01:36 AM »
We will never know for sure, but there is a good chance that Columbus was one. I would assume that 'they' would prefer to finance one of their own.

History remembers Columbus as the 'Man Who Discovered America'.  And if that isn't enough, there is an official holiday in his name as well.

I personally don't understand how you can discover someplace where there's already people living.   Ok ok so he was the first European to discover America.  But that's not true either.  So why in the heck is Columbus so special to be remembered by the people who decide what goes down as our history?

The idea that Columbus was the first jew to the New World makes a lot of sense.

Quote
Read the history of Christopher Columbus who was a thief and a killer of the Indians who he enslaved and murdered. I suggest a reading of Howard Zinn’s A Peoples History of the United States and after reading the true history of Columbus one should be embarrassed to claim any connection with him.

This is the only paragraph in the above I believe, as the rest glorified Columbus as some sort of great spiritual person.  One must remember the jews were kicked out of Spain because they were publicly caught ritually sacrificing a young child.

Offline Wulfgar

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- * Was Christopher Columbus a Jew?
« Reply #4 on: February 27, 2013, 10:49:57 AM »
The idea that Columbus was the first jew to the New World makes a lot of sense.

He definitely had some Jews on board the ships.  The story was always that he was Italian.

 
One must remember the jews were kicked out of Spain because they were publicly caught ritually sacrificing a young child.

Never had heard that, although it's probably true, since accusations were so widespread among communities that had no communications with others.  Of course, the cries of "blood libel" drowns it all out.  It's hard keeping a lid on it. 

However, there were other activities that led to Jews being tossed out (as is usually the case).  The Spanish people were well aware who helped facilitate the influx of Moors.  Further, there was the issue of real Cryptos (not of the EB imaginary variety).  They had infiltrated the Church to corrupt it.  Despite the fables that Jews claimed that they were weeded out "just for being Jewish," they were brought to justice for their lies and subversive activities (again, as is usually the case).  They had done significant damage to Spain and Portugal, reaffirming their status as "nation wreckers," and there were no wet eyes after the expulsion.

Another fact worth mentioning is that Spain attained prosperity without Jews.  Yes, there was the matter that gold and other resources were looted from Central and South America, but Eurpean monarchies had always towed the party line that there had to be Jew bankers to finance increased wealth.  Remove the yolk of usury, and national prosperty comes more naturally (the Byzantines also understood this fact).

Offline Wulfgar

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« Reply #5 on: February 27, 2013, 11:12:38 AM »
He definitely had some Jews on board the ships.  The story was always that he was Italian.


The other thought that just occurred to me is that there was a effort, a few years ago, to undermine Columbus Day as a holiday.  The PC crowd (completely Jew led) agitated white liberals and Latinos, by smearing the voyage as the cause of genocide.  Still, there's the Askenazi/Sephardic divide, which was discussed in a different thread yesterday.  Since this falls in October, Rosh Hoshana & Yom Kippur are the 2 big high, holy Jew days. 

Although it's possible that Columbus might've been Sephardic, enough centuries have elapsed that this could've emerged by now.  (Witness the just-moved Jews/Slave Trade thread).  Jews get a bigger kick out of attempting to undermine white, Christian historical accomplishments.  So, based on that fact alone, it leads me to conclude that Columbus probably was Italian.  Remember, he also attempted to get sponsorship in Italy before contacting Queen Isabella.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #6 on: February 27, 2013, 04:56:30 PM »
In 1492, the Muslim Kingdom of Granada fell to Isabella and Ferdinand, thus completing the Reconquista. That same year, all Jews in Spain who refused to convert to Christianity were expelled by royal edict.

Christopher Columbus and the New World:

Also in 1492, Isabella was convinced by Christopher Columbus to sponsor his voyage of discovery. The lasting effects of this were many: by the traditions of the time, when Columbus discovered lands in the New World, they were given to Castile. Isabella took a special interest in the Native Americans of the new lands; when some were brought back to Spain as slaves she insisted they be returned and freed, and her will expressed her wish that the "Indians" be treated with justice and fairness.


Was Columbus Jewish?

You Decide!


This question is famous and grabs our attention. If you heard some alleged proofs but never had the time to examine them for yourself, this article is for you! I will try to show you the proofs and allow you to answer the question yourself once and for all.

We have copies of thirteen letters written by Colón to his son Diogo, from November 12, 1504 to February 24, 1505. On twelve of them, there appears in the top left corner as a monogram in cursive script, the two characters “Beis” and “Hei,” which are the initials of the Hebrew words “Baruch Hashem“, which pious Jews have the habit of writing on top of their papers. These twelve letters are signed with “Xpo” and the thirteenth letter, which doesn’t contain the cursive, is signed “El Admirante.” This is because the thirteenth letter was to be shown to the Queen, and it would have been foolish to show the Queen a document with Hebrew letters on it, or a signature with a disguised confession of Jewish faith.

This peculiar sign or cipher, according to Simon Wiesenthal (1973), appears on all of those letters in the upper left corner. This cipher consists of two Hebrew characters “bais” and “hey”, which stand for baruch hashem, an expression used by Jews. The letters bais and hey are intertwined like a monogram.

We have copies of thirteen letters written by Colón to his son Diogo, from November 12, 1504 to February 24, 1505. On twelve of them, there appears in the top left corner as a monogram in cursive script, the two characters “Beis” and “Hei,” which are the initials of the Hebrew words “Baruch Hashem“, which pious Jews have the habit of writing on top of their papers. These twelve letters are signed with “Xpo” and the thirteenth letter, which doesn’t contain the cursive, is signed “El Admirante.” This is because the thirteenth letter was to be shown to the Queen, and it would have been foolish to show the Queen a document with Hebrew letters on it, or a signature with a disguised confession of Jewish faith.

This peculiar sign or cipher, according to Simon Wiesenthal (1973), appears on all of those letters in the upper left corner. This cipher consists of two Hebrew characters “bais” and “hey”, which stand for baruch hashem, an expression used by Jews. The letters bais and hey are intertwined like a monogram.

Throughout his life, Christopher Columbus never discussed his parents or relatives. We only know from a reference to Genoa that this was most likely his city of birth. He spoke Spanish eloquently. His family name was Columbo, the Italianized form of Colón. Colón was a Jewish name. A baptized Jew name Colón was reported to have been put on trial in 1250 in Southern France for performing Jewish religious rights. A Joseph Colón was among the leading rabbinical authorities of the fifteenth century. In Spain, the earliest trials of morranos (or conversos [a Spanish Jew who publicly converted to Christianity]) in 1461 ended in the burning of Thome Colón, his wife and his son. The list continues, causing us to suspect something based upon his name.



The day before Colón’s death on May 20, 1506, he signed his will, after his illness took a sudden turn for the worse, with the signature last used in 1492, “Xpo FERENS”. His last silent prayer for divine forgiveness.

Colón may have failed to reach Israel, but he did lay down the foundations of a new home for a large number of morranos in his time. Although Colón never had the opportunity to confess his true religion, indeed it is his discovery that has lead to the vast amount of Torah and Judaism which is learned and practiced freely today. For that, whether or not I have you convinced you that he was Jewish, he definitely deserves some thanks!

[Much of this article is based on a chapter by Samuel Talkowsky from "They Took To The Sea" (1964). The author wishes to thank Chaim Meiselman for his assistance in typing and suggesting improvements for this article.]

Read more: http://www.closetotorah.com/2009/04/was-christopher-columbus-jewish/
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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« Reply #7 on: February 27, 2013, 09:59:49 PM »
The other thought that just occurred to me is that there was a effort, a few years ago, to undermine Columbus Day as a holiday.  The PC crowd (completely Jew led) agitated white liberals and Latinos, by smearing the voyage as the cause of genocide.  Still, there's the Askenazi/Sephardic divide, which was discussed in a different thread yesterday.  Since this falls in October, Rosh Hoshana & Yom Kippur are the 2 big high, holy Jew days. 

Although it's possible that Columbus might've been Sephardic, enough centuries have elapsed that this could've emerged by now.  (Witness the just-moved Jews/Slave Trade thread).  Jews get a bigger kick out of attempting to undermine white, Christian historical accomplishments.  So, based on that fact alone, it leads me to conclude that Columbus probably was Italian.  Remember, he also attempted to get sponsorship in Italy before contacting Queen Isabella.

I agree, we can never be 100% sure but since Jews have made him out to be the so called bad guy it's more than likely he wasn't a Jew.
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Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #8 on: February 28, 2013, 10:21:48 PM »
I agree, we can never be 100% sure but since Jews have made him out to be the so called bad guy it's more than likely he wasn't a Jew.

OTOH Colombus' history is so faded into the background perhaps Jewish/bankster propaganda doesn't care about the actual details.  Their current effort is to promote genocidal Greenism & thus promote the "noble savage" concept of pre-Columbians.  LaRouche writes that Columbus was not the mere profit-seeker portrayed by conventional education but was a carrier of Renaissance ideas  typified by (German) Nicholas of Cusa.  IE they hoped to create a humanistic culture in America in opposition to the oligarch-ridden Europe.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #9 on: February 28, 2013, 10:51:28 PM »

This is the only paragraph in the above I believe, as the rest glorified Columbus as some sort of great spiritual person.  One must remember the jews were kicked out of Spain because they were publicly caught ritually sacrificing a young child.

This says it all:

    Meanwhile, over at Beliefnet.org, Rabbi Brad Hirschfield asks, “Why does it matter?”:

    Beyond the pride which many Jews feel at being able to claim Columbus as a Member of the Tribe, there are real lessons to be learned from his story - spiritual lessons which can help all of us on our own journeys, even if they are not as historic.

    First, if any of the stories of Columbus’ Jewishness are accurate, they remind us that we can be many things at the same time, and that having those multiple, even conflicting, identities can be a real advantage under certain circumstances.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.