Author Topic: Chabad Comes To Newtown  (Read 3836 times)

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Offline WaltDisney

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Chabad Comes To Newtown
« on: January 13, 2013, 08:08:36 AM »
Chabad Came to Newtown

The extraordinarily unjust, race-based, two-tiered legal system inherent to Judaism and its "Noahide laws" is laid out in the Babylonian Talmud:


"A non-Jew is put to death on the basis of a decision given by one judge [no jury], and on the basis of testimony given by a single witness, and even if he was not given a proper warning prior to the commission of his offense. He is put to death on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a man but not on the basis of testimony and a decision given by a woman, and the man who testified or decided against him can even be a relative.

"A Jew can only be put to death by a court of twenty-three judges, and on the basis of the testimony of two male witnesses who are not disqualified from testifying on account of kinship, and after being properly warned against committing the transgression. But none of these rules apply in the case of a non-Jew." (Babylonian Talmud, Sanhedrin 57b, Steinsaltz edition, vol.18, page 110)







Rabbi Yisroel Deren and his wife Aviva Deren, Chabad shluchim (agents) of
Stamford, traveled to Newtown, reportedly at the invitation of a 'Noahide'
(see article below)








'Noahide' David Egorov, Chabad Rabbi Yisroel Deren, President Barack Obama, Chabad Rabbi Sholom Deitsch backstage at the Newtown High School ecumenical prayer vigil, December 16, 2012  




President Obama receives Noahide prayer booklet from Chabad-associated 'Noahide' Davide Egorov at Newtown High School, Decemberi 16, 2012    




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Driving Home From Newtown
By Aviva Deren

Until this weekend I had never heard of Noah Pozner or of his family. But Noah’s father, Lenny, has a friend, and the friend had heard of us and called.

“They need you. You can speak to them, you can relate to them. Come, please come.”

There isn’t much to say to a request like that. I knew why we had been called. It was not only because my husband is a compassionate and caring rabbi who has brought comfort to so many hurting people. We were being asked to help because as bereaved parents ourselves, several times over, perhaps we had something more to offer—if only to be evidence that it is possible to breathe after the breath has literally been knocked out of you. With much trepidation, I traveled with my husband to the house where the Pozners were. I walked in with a prayer on my lips that whatever we say will bring comfort, and not, G‑d forbid, add to the unbearable burden these people were already carrying.

We were brought to a quiet room, away from the hustle and bustle, to speak with Noah’s family. I found myself listening to a brokenhearted mother describing her little boy, Noah, one of the first-graders at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, who was the youngest of the victims in the shootings last Friday. Those are, and should remain, private conversations, the kind of conversations that no one should have to have, ever.

What I do want to share are some thoughts that came to me as the day wore on.

Noah. The themes of the biblical story kept playing in my mind. Noah. Someone described in the Torah as a tzaddik, a righteous person, “complete.” All of humanity is considered to be his descendants, bound in a covenant with G‑d, to partner with Him to create a world of peace and harmony, of justice, goodness and kindness. The almost universal symbols of peace, a dove and an olive branch, trace back to Noah and his story.

Lenny’s friend is not Jewish, but he is passionately committed to the Noahide Code, the covenant that the Torah teaches was entered into by G‑d and Noah after the Flood, a covenant that binds G‑d and Noah’s descendants for all time. These universal commandments are the antecedent of any formal religion. The Noahide code is based not on clergy or houses of worship, but on the covenant between the Creator and humanity, the foundation for all human endeavor. Seven principles, seven commandments, that if they were implemented would bring about a virtual utopia of human existence.

“Noah loved rainbows,” his mother is telling someone. Rainbows! The sign of G‑d’s promise never, ever to bring a flood on the whole world again. A symbol of healing, promise, and optimism.

We have moved to the high school, where the president is going to meet with each of the families. Governor Malloy and his wife, Cathy, come into the room first. The governor speaks gently with each family member. He embraces my husband warmly, turning to the family—“This is my very good friend.” They speak briefly about how we go forward after this overwhelming tragedy. The governor asks my husband to be in touch within the next 24–48 hours.

The president enters with no fanfare or even an announcement and, without being told to do so, everyone rises. I am moved to tears watching him with these grief-stricken people. The power of this gesture is immense; he truly does convey the sense that the whole country is mourning alongside these anguished families. The way he bends down to speak with Noah’s twin sister, the way he comforts the grandparents and gently joshes the teenage siblings, the way he makes a point of saying, as he did later, that “we will be with you,” not just now, but for the long haul. The president met privately with every single family, and took time to speak at length with each bereaved parent.

Noah’s family did not stay for the vigil; we left the high school with them and the caring, close-knit circle of family and friends that surround them so tightly. On the way home, we listened to the president.
I found his speech stirring, and even more than that, heartfelt. There was an authenticity in this speech that one does not often encounter in public life. In my opinion, the speech was simply magnificent. I hope that every classroom in our country will study those words and figure out how to translate them into real life. I hope that adults will hold those same conversations. Most of all, I feel that his words were a call to action to all of us, to access the best within us individually and as a country, to really, truly, once and for all do what has to be done so that our world is a place where things like this can never happen again. To take those words of “never happen again” out of the fairy tales and put them where they can make a difference.

Late in the afternoon it hit me: We need a flood! Not, G‑d forbid, a destructive flood—we’ve had more than enough of that. What we need is a good flood—a flood of kindness, of caring, of compassion, of goodness, of warmth, of benevolence, of support, of reaching out. There are, thank G‑d, enough of us on this planet to make sure that not one human being ever feels lost. We need a flood of connections. Not just the trickles that come from time to time, but everywhere, all the time.

We need to be at least as aware of the ecology of human behavior as we are of the ecology of the physical resources of the planet. It has to penetrate all aspects of our world—the worlds of business, the media, education, culture, science, the arts, medicine—we need a flood, a good flood. Every single one of us has to know that we can make a difference, and we need to put serious thought to how we can best do that. “Noah’s Flood” could take on a whole new meaning.

My husband made a suggestion to the president, that in the effort to draw good from the unfathomable evil that occurred we should offer a “moment of silence” at the beginning of each school day. This “moment of silence” will allow those children who want to pray the opportunity to do so; it will foster discussion between parents and children of the spiritual values they hold dear as a family. This suggestion was first made years ago by the Rebbe, who always held the clear vision of a world perfected by the partnership of G‑d and human beings.

And here, Mr. President, if I may respectfully offer one change—no, make that one addition—to your words. Yes, G‑d has taken them home. But now it’s time for the rest of us to make sure that G‑d’s home is right here on earth, to make sure that we, all of us together, bring heaven down to earth.

And Newtown will then forever be known as the place where light triumphed over darkness, the place where the healing of our aching world finally began for real.





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Evil Came to Newton/Newtown


Adam Lanza's paternal grandfather Peter S. Lanza lived on Newton Rd. in Plaistow, New Hampshire. Lanza was a member of the Sons of Italy lodge which was founded by an immigrant from Palermo. Like the ADL of B'nai B'rith lodge, the Sons of Italy labor to portray a clean image of Italians. Similarly however, contradictions to that image do emerge.

Palermo Lanzas controlled both the New York and San Francisco ports for the mafia. Joseph "Socks" Lanza was a capo for the Luciano/Genovese crime family who controlled the longshoreman's union and Fulton St. fish market in New York City and cooperated with Naval Intelligence during WWII.

Adam Lanza's paternal grandfather was a usurer as is his father and brother. His mother was a trader at John Hancock in Boston, his grandfather Peter S. Lanza was also a trader for John Hancock, his father a V.P. in the tax-evasion department of the banking/weapons manufacturing/media conglomerate, G.E. whose weapons kill children worldwide who do not receive week-long televised vigils from G.E's media wing (NBC).

Also of interest, Lanza business with, The Jews in Sicily, Volume 13 Notaries of Palermo: Part Four

Purported never-published writings of Isaac Newton have recently surfaced which have him stating his disbelief in core Christian doctrines and belief that one only need obey the talmudic 'Noahide Laws' to achieve salvation.

It's reported that these writings were covered up for centuries because of their scandalous nature. They were bought at auction by the homosexual philojudaic banker John Maynard Keynes whose economic theories continue to plague us. He is said to have been fascinated by these writings:

http://books.google.com/books?id=mvbTBHyaP8sC&pg=PA133&dq=isaac+newton+noahide&hl=en&sa=X&ei=sfPVUMTBErGJ0QGwuIDQBw&ved=0CDkQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=isaac%20newton%20noahide&f=false

Isaac Newton may have gone mad from mercury poisoning. As an alchemist he believed it necessary to experience the taste of the substance. Invoking alchemy, the establishment tells us that Newtown must be a catalyst for change.





At the crossroads of the old village of Newtown is a Hiram Royal Arch Lodge #18 (18 signifying Judaic 'life' in Kabbalah see HERE). It's said that, "The Royal Arch stands as the rainbow of promise in the Ritual" of Royal Arch Masonry
(see: Builder Magazine: A Journal for the Masonic Student, Joseph Fort Newton). The rainbow figures heavily in Noahidism; it appeared after Noah's flood, 7 colors, seven 'Noahide laws.' There was a menorah prominently displayed in this lodge's front window.








Royal Arch masonry is concerned primarily with the rebuilding of the Temple in Jerusalem. Isaac Newton heavily occupied himself with the study of the architecture of Solomon's Temple.



The theme of Noah's flood is that God punishes a sinful world with a great catastrophe and then begins a new era/dispensation. Rabbis and their collaborators often use calamities as justification for declaration of new eras/dispensations.

A Rabbi Shaul Praver figured heavily in media coverage. He intoned the ecumenical prayer vigil which featured a speech from President Obama centered around the message that because of the Newtown terror event, "we must change."

At a community prayer meeting the day before, Rabbi Praver invoked the rainbow and said "we need to change everything":

Telling his congregants that the “culture of violence” would have to change, at a community prayer session on Saturday, Rabbi Praver said, “We live in a culture of violence. All of our culture is based on violence and we need to teach the kids about the ways of peace. We need to change everything.
Rabbi Praver said, “Life is not happening on the other side of the rainbow. We are on the other side of the rainbow.” 
http://jewishvoiceny.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=2660:jewish-funeral-held-for-boy-killed-in-ct-massacre&catid=110:national&Itemid=293
The Judaic boy that Rabbi Praver represents is named Noah.

Following the 9-11 terror event Thomas L. Friedman of the New York Times wrote an editorial proclaiming the 'Noahide Laws' to be "the world's only hope" in avoiding a catastrophe of biblical great flood proportions.

Chabad Rabbi Shlomo Riskin has said, "Without the 'Noahide Laws' humanity would dissolve in a blast of nuclear explosions"
"I hardly exaggerate. Jewish life consists of two elements: Extracting money and protesting."
-Nahum Goldmann, Ex-President of the World Jewish Congress

Offline jacob gold

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- Chabad Comes To Newtown
« Reply #1 on: January 13, 2013, 09:09:45 AM »
Moishe Lanzas Yenta momma







The Jewish brother








Adam 'Moishe' Lanza







Moishe's father at a young age






Lanza is a Sciliian/Italian Jewish surname.


Palermo Lanzas controlled both the New York and San Francisco ports for the mafia. Joseph "Socks" Lanza was a capo for the Luciano/Genovese crime family who controlled the longshoreman's union and Fulton St. fish market in New York City and cooperated with Naval Intelligence during WWII.

Adam Lanza's paternal grandfather was a usurer as is his father and brother. His mother was a trader at John Hancock in Boston, his grandfather Peter S. Lanza was also a trader for John Hancock, his father a V.P. in the tax-evasion department of the banking/weapons manufacturing/media conglomerate,

Offline FLAT_HEADED_RUSSIAN

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- Chabad Comes To Newtown
« Reply #2 on: January 13, 2013, 01:28:33 PM »
Quote
Palermo Lanzas controlled both the New York and San Francisco ports for the mafia. Joseph "Socks" Lanza was a capo for the Luciano/Genovese crime family who controlled the longshoreman's union and Fulton St. fish market in New York City and cooperated with Naval Intelligence during WWII.

Adam Lanza's paternal grandfather was a usurer as is his father and brother. His mother was a trader at John Hancock in Boston, his grandfather Peter S. Lanza was also a trader for John Hancock, his father a V.P. in the tax-evasion department of the banking/weapons manufacturing/media conglomerate, G.E. whose weapons kill children worldwide who do not receive week-long televised vigils from G.E's media wing (NBC).
Its called gettin your hooks in

Follow the (laundered) money
We are Legion
We do not forgive
We do not forget
Expect us

Offline BlackVeil

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- Chabad Comes To Newtown
« Reply #3 on: January 13, 2013, 03:23:53 PM »
A Rabbi Shaul Praver figured heavily in media coverage. He intoned the ecumenical prayer vigil which featured a speech from President Obama centered around the message that because of the Newtown terror event, "we must change."
...Rabbi Praver said, “Life is not happening on the other side of the rainbow. We are on the other side of the rainbow.” 


Weird symbolism and rhetoric.

Offline dominique

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« Reply #4 on: January 13, 2013, 06:37:15 PM »

A Rabbi Shaul Praver figured heavily in media coverage. He intoned the ecumenical prayer vigil which featured a speech from President Obama centered around the message that because of the Newtown terror event, "we must change."

At a community prayer meeting the day before, Rabbi Praver invoked the rainbow and said "we need to change everything":

Telling his congregants that the “culture of violence” would have to change, at a community prayer session on Saturday, Rabbi Praver said, “We live in a culture of violence. All of our culture is based on violence and we need to teach the kids about the ways of peace. We need to change everything.


Yes we DO live in a "culture of violence." Thanks to Hollywood, first-person-shooter games, etc etc, courtesy of the chosen ones.
"Divert, distort, denigrate, disrupt or destroy any discussion of the corruption of American liberty by the organized lobby of a foreign power."  ~ WindRiverShoshoni

Offline EyeBelieve

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- Chabad Comes To Newtown
« Reply #5 on: January 13, 2013, 10:51:36 PM »
Chabad Came to Newtown

'Noahide' David Egorov, Chabad Rabbi Yisroel Deren, President Barack Obama, Chabad Rabbi Sholom Deitsch backstage at the Newtown High School ecumenical prayer vigil, December 16, 2012  

Chabad is almost "everywhere" with their crappy little houses--they don't want to spend big on useless temples--not part of their efficient money-laundering scheme.