Author Topic: Ongoing DC Summer Droughts  (Read 4689 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« on: July 05, 2012, 11:21:33 PM »
Ruinous Midwest USA droughts are causing huge problems in agriculture...& while folks don't associate Washington DC with farming it's still surrounded by heavily agricultural areas ie Pennsylvania to the north, southern Virginia & eastern Maryland (home of Perdue chicken empire).  Local nor national MSM rarely addresses the now-frequent DC summer droughts.  Local agriculture & victory gardens are great but many farmers don't have irrigation to support corn fields & suburbanites/exurbanites are sometimes warned/forbidden not to water lawns/shrubs/trees.

DC area used to be regularly humid & rainy in summers with frequent thunderstorms & heavy rains but in roughly last 10 years we've had 6 or 7 with punishing heat, little cloud cover & weeks or months of little or no rain.  Lawns die off, shrubs & trees wither (then collapse in storms, recent huge electrical outages).  What's up with this?  Could huge DC metro area be creating a heat island micro-climate effect?  Climate change (don't believe in MSM line about anthro-warming but certainly climate does change naturally)?  As recent local drought has started I notice that chemtrails have disappeared.   

For DC area folks, growing veggies has gotten to be a huge hassle, daily watering is a must for weeks on end & fences are required to block away voracious deer (this year they've decided they like morning glories & marigolds).

This site claims to have NOAA data for DC rainfall but I don't think it's accurate.
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/lwx/climate/dca/dcaprecip.txt

Offline Judson

  • Second Lieutenant
  • *
  • Posts: 560
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #1 on: July 06, 2012, 03:36:03 AM »
Yes I built 32 years ago and planted schrubs, trees, and bushes and rarely watered during the first 20+ years ... now it is necessary to soak the ground several times a month now during the summer especially. Yet the weather people act as if this is just a normal hot day in July ... those flowers and plants are like the canary in the coal mine .... warning that something is wrong.
‘Even if you didn’t do it, we don’t want you to do it again’

Offline wag

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 10423
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #2 on: July 06, 2012, 06:22:16 AM »
Vegetables are probably more drought tolerant than you think.  You surely don't want to water them every day; instead you want a drenching once a week (ideally from the sky).  But a lot of plants (esp. cucumbers, and broadleafs) cannot tolerate the extreme heat and will wilt.  Light watering can cool them, but actually hurt them more than help.  Do nothing and they perk back up when the shade hits them (and you should plan for later afternoon shading).  You want to deprive the plants to the degree where the tiny hair-like roots extend out and down to find the water.  Even if it is dry, if the soil is cool and damp 6 inches down, you're good.

Fencing will be a necessity, if not now, at some point due to the proliferation of backyard gardens and the critters that they will draw.  I have a fence mainly to keep my dogs out of the garden, and the dogs take care of the rest, except slugs and bugs and birds in the strawberry patch (which needs netting).

The other issue is nutrients.  Heavy clay is hard to balance, and lighter soils need lots of organic supplements.  Compost tends to be acidic (as is rain!), which further depletes minerals.  Adding sea salt and espon salt (mag sulfate) is effective, and adding lime both lowers the acidity and adds calcium to prevent blossom/bottom rot (esp. on heirloom tomatoes). 

Concerning weather, I have noticed a prevalent huge low-pressure vortexes that languish in the upper heartland and seem to always affect mid-atlantic weather.  I started notices these a few years ago.  Probaby jet stream related, which in turn is probably a cyclic thing that we are in the middle of.  Greenland used to be green, so yes, things can change.
Nobody gets paid to tell the truth.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #3 on: July 06, 2012, 09:32:04 AM »
Quote
EB: Local nor national MSM rarely addresses the now-frequent DC summer droughts.

I believe you, there was no mention made here about these strange looking clouds either...

We have had unprecedented amounts of rain, an abundance of Chemtrails, several times daily, we could watch the lower flying planes from the dock... which is closed now because of high water.

Rather late, but today is really the first nice Summer day.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline OldTimes

  • Major General
  • **
  • Posts: 4568
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2012, 12:47:11 PM »
Greenland used to be green, so yes, things can change.

Greenland was never green.
It got its name to confuse potential invaders away from Iceland (which was green).

Offline wag

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 10423
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2012, 06:46:38 PM »
Greenland was never green.
It got its name to confuse potential invaders away from Iceland (which was green).

I never doubt the use of the big lie.  A very effective technique.  Makes sense.  I say that living in the land of the free and home of the brave.
Nobody gets paid to tell the truth.

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2012, 06:48:12 PM »
Yes I built 32 years ago and planted schrubs, trees, and bushes and rarely watered during the first 20+ years ... now it is necessary to soak the ground several times a month now during the summer especially. Yet the weather people act as if this is just a normal hot day in July ... those flowers and plants are like the canary in the coal mine .... warning that something is wrong.

I think the weather media has a tacit agreement not to talk about moderate droughts in the metro areas, local gov'ts don't want to encourage watering.  But while most folks don't water they end up with damaged lawns & trees.  Thus they need more chemicals to kill weeds & stressed trees break in storms (like the recent biggie with huge power outages).

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2012, 07:02:41 PM »
Vegetables are probably more drought tolerant than you think.  You surely don't want to water them every day; instead you want a drenching once a week (ideally from the sky).  But a lot of plants (esp. cucumbers, and broadleafs) cannot tolerate the extreme heat and will wilt.  Light watering can cool them, but actually hurt them more than help.  Do nothing and they perk back up when the shade hits them (and you should plan for later afternoon shading).  You want to deprive the plants to the degree where the tiny hair-like roots extend out and down to find the water.  Even if it is dry, if the soil is cool and damp 6 inches down, you're good.

Fencing will be a necessity, if not now, at some point due to the proliferation of backyard gardens and the critters that they will draw.  I have a fence mainly to keep my dogs out of the garden, and the dogs take care of the rest, except slugs and bugs and birds in the strawberry patch (which needs netting).

The other issue is nutrients.  Heavy clay is hard to balance, and lighter soils need lots of organic supplements.  Compost tends to be acidic (as is rain!), which further depletes minerals.  Adding sea salt and espon salt (mag sulfate) is effective, and adding lime both lowers the acidity and adds calcium to prevent blossom/bottom rot (esp. on heirloom tomatoes). 

Concerning weather, I have noticed a prevalent huge low-pressure vortexes that languish in the upper heartland and seem to always affect mid-atlantic weather.  I started notices these a few years ago.  Probaby jet stream related, which in turn is probably a cyclic thing that we are in the middle of.  Greenland used to be green, so yes, things can change.

Used to grow some veggies in a little plot, seemed like the more work I put in the worse results.  Ideal thing is to have like 3 patches so one can rotate crops & help prevent virus buildup. Yes with good deep soil it can retain some water but still with this sunny hot weather one will still have to do a fair amount of watering.  If I had more space I'd say it's worth the effort.  DC is kind of a tough climate for veggies, spring gets hot quick & hampers lettuce, spinach, beets etc.  Good for eggplant & peppers though.  Loved growing eggplant, very easy & productive.  Cukes & tomatoes got diseases though in the old days I had good luck in other places.

Offline wag

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 10423
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2012, 07:11:09 PM »
Used to grow some veggies in a little plot, seemed like the more work I put in the worse results.  Ideal thing is to have like 3 patches so one can rotate crops & help prevent virus buildup. Yes with good deep soil it can retain some water but still with this sunny hot weather one will still have to do a fair amount of watering.  If I had more space I'd say it's worth the effort.  DC is kind of a tough climate for veggies, spring gets hot quick & hampers lettuce, spinach, beets etc.  Good for eggplant & peppers though.  Loved growing eggplant, very easy & productive.  Cukes & tomatoes got diseases though in the old days I had good luck in other places.

The leaves of my eggplant would always get eaten by flea beetles, so I stopped growing them.  I don't want to try very hard.  But I know what to sprinkle out there, and I do mulch in the spring to prevent weeds.  The most work involves seed starting. 
Nobody gets paid to tell the truth.

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2012, 07:18:01 PM »
I believe you, there was no mention made here about these strange looking clouds either...

We have had unprecedented amounts of rain, an abundance of Chemtrails, several times daily, we could watch the lower flying planes from the dock... which is closed now because of high water.

Rather late, but today is really the first nice Summer day.

Amazing that you guys are getting deluged, I thought you were in the drier inland parts of BC.  Just remember to wave to the chemtrail planes!   ;)  Does weather affect the visibility of chemtrails?  Maybe if it's very hot & dry & breezy they disperse or evaporate quicker?  I sort of doubt that though.  Here it seems like chemtrails are just on or off, today had cloudless blue skies, haven't seen trails for several days now.

Offline Judson

  • Second Lieutenant
  • *
  • Posts: 560
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2012, 08:14:30 PM »
Weather patterns do change alright .... was reading that the grapes now grown in the sunny Mediterranean lands once were planted in England and that corn was once harvested in Greenland during the viking era. Hadn't thought about the conspiracy between the meteorologists and the city organizers to keep the water usage down,  but keeping the sheep calm is important ... especially these days.
‘Even if you didn’t do it, we don’t want you to do it again’

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2012, 08:45:52 PM »
Amazing that you guys are getting deluged, I thought you were in the drier inland parts of BC.  Just remember to wave to the chemtrail planes!   ;)  Does weather affect the visibility of chemtrails?  Maybe if it's very hot & dry & breezy they disperse or evaporate quicker?  I sort of doubt that though.  Here it seems like chemtrails are just on or off, today had cloudless blue skies, haven't seen trails for several days now.

They are too busy seeding clouds! Same good weather here today, we could not ask for a better day, the 2nd one since May. I am in the drier parts of this beautiful Province, EB. This area here is considered semi-desert.

AccuWeather
24°C
Feels like 24°
Mostly Sunny

High: 29°
Wind: 3 kmph SSW
Low: 12°
Humidity: 57%
Visibility: 23 km
Barometer: 1016 mb

The Thompson-Okanagan and the Cariboo region have the driest climates, with pleasant winters and hot summers.

http://www.welcomebc.ca/wbc/immigration/choose/province/climate.page
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2012, 08:51:31 PM »
.... but keeping the sheep calm is important ... especially these days.

HE, he...  ;D
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #13 on: July 07, 2012, 05:48:08 PM »
They are too busy seeding clouds!

Today was somewhat hazy & presto a few chemtrails reappear; perhaps in this area they try to disguise the chemtrails by doing them when there are some clouds.

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #14 on: July 07, 2012, 09:22:26 PM »
Today was somewhat hazy & presto a few chemtrails reappear; perhaps in this area they try to disguise the chemtrails by doing them when there are some clouds.

I am certain that they have done this here as well, and/or overnight. Anyway, none today.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Iron Webmaster

  • Master Chief
  • *
  • Posts: 302
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
    • Giwer's World
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #15 on: July 16, 2012, 11:21:23 AM »
Weather patterns are fun but do not try to make much of trends until they are much longer than a decade. And remember nature does not know from base ten so don't hang onto a decade.
To wit, when I first moved to Tampa Bay area of Florida back in 1991 the summer weather was literally like clockwork. Some time after 5pm it would cloud up. Then i headed to the grocery. While inside the was a thunderstorm. Most always by the time finished the storm was over. Locals bragged about the regularity.
That pattern died in the late 90s. In most of the years since then it has been a drought with watering restrictions (mainly for lawns) in force. Last year we started getting regular rain and the water table is rising. There are still limits on watering but for most of the summer there has been late afternoon rain. Not the clockwork 5pm accuracy, sort of spread out between 3 and 7 with several bands of showers a day but it is much more like it was when i first arrived.
Speaking of DC, I lived there from 1967 to 1991. In the early 80s the news said we were having a drought. I had no garden problems at that time but it was a drought, below average rainfall compared to the long term average. And there is the gimmick, against long term average.
For farmers there is a wide range of crops that require different amounts of water. The consequence of this kind of drought is water hungry crops are planted when less water falls. Generally the band of the "correct" amount rain is broad so it takes a big change to cause a problem.
In Florida the issue is a bit different. In theory summer rain fills the aquifer which farmers use in winter when this place is like a desert to grow winter crops for the northern markets. It is essential for winter crops but it not generally needed in the summer -- unless there is a drought.
And that is about all I have figured out.
1.9 GB of pure vanity

Jews stole the land. The owners want it back.
That is all you need to know about the conflict. All the rest is distraction.
See the new biopic, Jesus Christ: Lust for Glory!

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #16 on: July 21, 2012, 04:35:30 PM »

For several years since 2001 the existence of an unusual type of aerial spraying activity has been observed and reported, generally termed "Chemtrails". Chemtrails differ from typical aero contrails in their high degree of persistence and subsequent spreading, as if a substance had been released. After years of research, the "chemtrail" issue is now known to be "Stratospheric Aerosol Geo-Engineering".

Other Nano Chemtrails have also been observed.

AEROSOL CRIMES ch2 CONtrail vs. CHEMtrail DISTICTIONS








http://www.panacea-bocaf.org/chemtrails.htm
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- Ongoing DC Summer Droughts
« Reply #17 on: August 13, 2012, 11:27:10 PM »
Weather patterns are fun but do not try to make much of trends until they are much longer than a decade. And remember nature does not know from base ten so don't hang onto a decade.

Perhaps true but about 20 years ago I bought local weatherman Doug Ryan's almanac & was surprised to read that in DC area month-to-month rainfall averages were nearly identical.  Plus way before I got into gardening I saw that DC summer weather was typically humid & hazy with frequent thunderstorms.

Quote
To wit, when I first moved to Tampa Bay area of Florida back in 1991 the summer weather was literally like clockwork. Some time after 5pm it would cloud up. Then i headed to the grocery. While inside the was a thunderstorm. Most always by the time finished the storm was over. Locals bragged about the regularity.
That pattern died in the late 90s. In most of the years since then it has been a drought with watering restrictions (mainly for lawns) in force. Last year we started getting regular rain and the water table is rising. There are still limits on watering but for most of the summer there has been late afternoon rain. Not the clockwork 5pm accuracy, sort of spread out between 3 and 7 with several bands of showers a day but it is much more like it was when i first arrived.
Speaking of DC, I lived there from 1967 to 1991. In the early 80s the news said we were having a drought. I had no garden problems at that time but it was a drought, below average rainfall compared to the long term average. And there is the gimmick, against long term average.
For farmers there is a wide range of crops that require different amounts of water. The consequence of this kind of drought is water hungry crops are planted when less water falls. Generally the band of the "correct" amount rain is broad so it takes a big change to cause a problem.
In Florida the issue is a bit different. In theory summer rain fills the aquifer which farmers use in winter when this place is like a desert to grow winter crops for the northern markets. It is essential for winter crops but it not generally needed in the summer -- unless there is a drought.
And that is about all I have figured out.

Florida at least has Gulf & Atlantic nearby for moisture sources.  Went to Miami a couple of years ago & surprised to see that condos watered lawns/gardens even one day after heavy rains.  Was told that hi-rise condos used sprinklers to get rid of runoff.  OTOH DC seems locked into dry hot western patterns & weirdly my corner of area is virtually immune to summer rains that fall 10-50 miles away.