Author Topic: The inter arpa net  (Read 2110 times)

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Offline Iron Webmaster

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The inter arpa net
« on: June 19, 2012, 03:12:27 AM »
I don't quite know how to make this funny but let me try to set the scene. I know a few people who worked on getting the original Arpanet working. It was an innovative DOD project but because you had to go to the next building to use a terminal to talk to anyone it was originally just a secure "hotline" or "red phone" network. Please this is not bragging as at the time it was simply a project not requiring any particular genius to implement. The innovation was in the multiple routes to any destination. This does not exist in the present day internet.

That said the people were not the nerds and hackers of today but suit and tie folks of the DOD discipline. Not stodgy per se but absolutely not outstanding in their lifestyle. This was an important Cold War project, means of assuring a second strike as well as a way to speed reconstruction after a nuclear exchange. These were serious people and on other projects before this had had more direct impacts on the Cold War efforts.

So I had this idea of a time traveler appearing in the middle of a working session and conveying the gratitude of the future for Facebook.
1.9 GB of pure vanity

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That is all you need to know about the conflict. All the rest is distraction.
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Offline Sue

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- The inter arpa net
« Reply #1 on: June 19, 2012, 07:13:34 AM »
Thanks to search engines:

''Did you send the first network email?

As far as I know, yes. However, there are a few qualifications. Network should be included because there were many earlier instances of email within a single machine. Computer networks, in any real sense, didn't exist until the ARPANET was built starting in 1969. Dick Watson proposed a form of email in July 1971 (RFC 196). I don't think that was ever implemented. It differed in that the mail was directed to numeric mailboxes. RFC 196 also suggests that the final product would be a printer output (i.e. ink on paper). SNDMSG sent messages to named individuals (computer users).''

What were the early uses of email?

The early uses were not terribly different from the current uses: The exceptions are that there was only plain text in the messages and there was no SPAM.

The purpose of the at sign (in English) was to indicate a unit price (for example, 10 items @ $1.95). I used the at sign to indicate that the user was "at" some other host rather than being local.


I even remember Hollerith Keypunch Machines. So, yes ~ we have come a long way.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline OldTimes

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« Reply #2 on: June 19, 2012, 02:08:34 PM »
It's amazing how many things we do today that didn't exist just 1 generation ago:

The internet,
Digital music/movies,
Smartphones,
GPS,
Wingsuit BASE jumping

Offline Sue

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« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2012, 08:13:54 PM »
It's amazing how many things we do today that didn't exist just 1 generation ago:

Wingsuit BASE jumping

This has to be a sport reserved for the few willing to dare. It does not look like a sport for the meek. My hubby had a chance to participate in the somewhat safer sport of gliding, in Priddis, Alberta. I guess the reason he took to air-sports is because in his younger years he served three years in a Canadian Airborne Regiment ~ and survived 16 jumps.

He said: the night jumps were the easiest, because he could not see how high he was.  :)
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2012, 10:09:42 PM »

So I had this idea of a time traveler appearing in the middle of a working session and conveying the gratitude of the future for Facebook.

Internet is older than most folks realize, part of the reason why I think timing of 9/11 was no accident.  In 2001 the Net was getting really big as the PTB foresaw...really it was getting big before that but in 2001 things were getting a bit settled & the PTB already had a handle on how to work things including mucho fake opposition.

Offline OldTimes

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« Reply #5 on: June 21, 2012, 04:22:11 AM »
Internet is older than most folks realize, part of the reason why I think timing of 9/11 was no accident.  In 2001 the Net was getting really big as the PTB foresaw...really it was getting big before that but in 2001 things were getting a bit settled & the PTB already had a handle on how to work things including mucho fake opposition.

I'm pretty sure that's what the dot-com era was all about:  all those venture-capitalists flowing jew money into owning/controlling the internet as a new medium.  Pretty-much every outfit I can think of that received venture capital was kosher (started/owned by jews/cryptos).

The dot-com 'bubble' had clearly ended by mid-2001.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2012, 09:21:24 PM »
I'm pretty sure that's what the dot-com era was all about:  all those venture-capitalists flowing jew money into owning/controlling the internet as a new medium.  Pretty-much every outfit I can think of that received venture capital was kosher (started/owned by jews/cryptos).

The dot-com 'bubble' had clearly ended by mid-2001.

Yes MSM talked about the heady crazy bubble days as just investment gone wild but 1) the jews were just playing with other folks' money & 2) the fact that many companies went spectacularly bust hides that for jews it was the price of controlling info, their historical aim.

Newsweek Magazine is a good example, it was bankrupt yet numerous jews sought to purchase it despite no hope of ever making $$ from it.  Sidney Harman bought it, now they're offering free subscriptions, anything to "vault the propaganda".  Sidney is hubby of Rep Jane, who was was caught doing a Sayanim deal to help defeat AIPAC spying investigation in return for help in getting chair of House Intel Committe.

Aww, look at that sweet smile, like a big huggable crocodile!