Author Topic: 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'  (Read 2978 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Rudi Jan

  • Administrator
  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 15113
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • aka LoneWolf
    • View Profile
    • FauxWorld
'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« on: December 18, 2011, 06:46:45 PM »
'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'

Mon Dec 19, 2011 2:56AM GMT
source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail/216500.html


US House Speaker John Boehner appears on NBC's 'Meet the Press' weekly
news show in Washington on December 18, 2011, where he warned of the
alleged risks facing Iraq's future in the absence of the US military forces.


US House Speaker John Boehner has claimed that the absence of the American military forces in Iraq poses a risk to the Middle Eastern country's future.

To “liberate” Iraq, Boehner also said on NBC's 'Meet the Press' weekly news show in Washington, the US had sacrificed many troopers and a lot of 'treasures.'

His comments come as the last US military convoy left Iraq on Sunday after a nearly-nine-year-long war.

However, thousands of military advisors, private contractors, and Christian missionaries will remain in the country as part of the US embassy personnel in the Iraqi capital of Baghdad.

The US military invasion and occupation has left around a million Iraqis killed, according to the California-based investigative organization Project Censored.

In 2003, the US invaded Iraq under the pretext of finding weapons of mass destruction allegedly stockpiled by the former Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein. However, later it was revealed that not only did not the Iraqi regime possess the weapons, but also that the US and British leaders, who had defended the military action, previously knew about their non-existence.

Additionally, the occupation has left some 4,500 US troops dead and thousands more injured, reportedly costing Washington nearly a whopping trillion dollars in military expenditures.

Meanwhile, US President Barack Obama has vowed to maintain, what he has described as, a robust diplomatic presence in Iraq. A large number of armed US guards are tasked with protecting the diplomatic staff.

LW - Laughable. Maybe if they go back in and kill another million or so people they'll be grovelling in gratitude to this dufus and his fellow psychopaths. Guess this will be the talking point on the subject in the weeks ahead while the Mossad/Al-quada continues to bomb mosques and any infrastructure improvements the Iraqis need.
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu

Offline FrankDialogue

  • Lieutenant General
  • ***
  • Posts: 5707
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #1 on: December 20, 2011, 06:17:34 AM »
'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'

[/color]

A lot of collaborators in Iraq are getting nervous.

Offline OldTimes

  • Major General
  • **
  • Posts: 4568
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #2 on: December 21, 2011, 02:52:14 PM »
This is kind of interesting because, they just pulled troops out of Iraq, presumably because they'll need them for somewhere else soon (perhaps Syria, or perhaps an all-out WW3).

This kind of posturing is an attempt to sell the world on the idea that 1) they'll need to send troops back to Iraq at some point, and 2) the reason will be some new development, no doubt planned and already in the works.

Offline Rudi Jan

  • Administrator
  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 15113
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • aka LoneWolf
    • View Profile
    • FauxWorld
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #3 on: December 21, 2011, 03:50:14 PM »
This is kind of interesting because, they just pulled troops out of Iraq, presumably because they'll need them for somewhere else soon (perhaps Syria, or perhaps an all-out WW3).

My take...  8)
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu

Offline EyeBelieve

  • General of the Army
  • *****
  • Posts: 8632
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #4 on: December 21, 2011, 11:21:10 PM »
His comments come as the last US military convoy left Iraq on Sunday after a nearly-nine-year-long war.

I don't like all the tv shows & news segments cheering return of vets to families.  These guys serve a lousy 1-yr stretch in Iraq & want to run home?  The GWOT is a 50-year+ project.  Hope the vets are happy knowing some Iraqi baby is growing up to be the next Saddam.

Offline pope daniel

  • Group Major
  • *
  • Posts: 1466
  • Karma: +0/-0
  • Order of Miseratio Solvo Templum
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #5 on: December 22, 2011, 01:45:18 AM »
obama won't take the heat over ww3 tho, they'll install some republican to kickstart that so it can be blamed on religion in the aftermath
Revelation 3:14 "To the angel of the church in Laodicea write: These are the words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God's creation.

Offline jacob gold

  • Troll
  • General of the Army
  • *
  • Posts: 9200
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #6 on: December 22, 2011, 07:51:36 AM »
So who is controlling the Green Zone and all the oil? Direct combat troops have been replaced by american financed and jew controllled mercenaries

Offline Rudi Jan

  • Administrator
  • Veteran
  • **
  • Posts: 15113
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • aka LoneWolf
    • View Profile
    • FauxWorld
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #7 on: December 22, 2011, 08:16:36 AM »
Multiple bomb blasts kill 63 in Iraq

Thu Dec 22, 2011 7:58AM GMT
source: http://www.presstv.ir/detail/217074.html


Smoke rises from the site of a bombing in central Baghdad on December 22, 2011.

Sixty three people have been killed and scores of others injured in multiple bomb explosions in the Iraqi capital city of Baghdad, an official says.

Ziad Tariq, spokesperson for the Iraqi health ministry, said people 63 were killed and 176 were injured in 10 bombing attacks that rocked nine neighborhoods of the capital on Thursday morning.

The attacks were carried out in the Allawi, Bab al-Muatham and Karrada districts of central Baghdad, the Adhamiyah, Shuala and Shaab neighborhoods in the north, Jadriyah in the east, Ghazaliyah in the west and Amal and Dura in the south.

The deadly incidents in Iraq took place at a time that the country is experiencing a critical situation.

On Monday, the Iraqi interior ministry issued an arrest warrant for Vice President Tariq al-Hashemi after three of his bodyguards made confessions of taking orders from him to carry out terrorist attacks in the country over the past years.

Hashemi has denied allegations of involvement in acts of terrorism.

The Iraqiya party, which holds 82 of the 325 seats in the Iraqi parliament, issued a statement on Saturday, saying the bloc “is suspending its participation in parliament from Saturday and calling for the opening of a round-table to find a solution that will support democracy and civil institutions.”

The bloc accuses Maliki of “monopolizing all decision-making.”

On Wednesday, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki warned that he would appoint new cabinet ministers if the current ministers from the Iraqiya party do not attend cabinet sessions.

The Iraqi premier has also called on different political groups help resolve the crisis in the country.

Iraqiya is a political coalition of Hashimi's Renewal List party, the Iraqi National List led by former Prime Minister Iyad Allawi and the Iraqi Front for National Dialogue led by Saleh al-Mutlaq.

LW - Remnants of the occupation busy, busy, busy to remind us how insecure Iraq is now that the yanks are on their way home via Syria.
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu

Offline Sue

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 19731
  • Karma: +1/-0
  • Thumbs Up
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #8 on: December 22, 2011, 08:35:52 AM »
Baghdad blasts target Shi'ites, kill 63



A burnt vehicle is seen after a bomb attack took place in Baghdad's Bayaa district …



Iraqi security forces inspect the site of the bomb attack in Baghdad's Shaab District, …

Reuters By Kareem Raheem | Reuters – 1 hour 54 minutes ago source

BAGHDAD (Reuters) - A wave of bombings killed at least 63 people in Baghdad on Thursday, the first attacks since Iraq's Shi'ite-led government was engulfed in a crisis that risks fracturing the country along sectarian and ethnic faultlines.

The bombings, just days after the last U.S. troops left Iraq, marked a violent backlash against Shi'ite Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki's move to sideline two Sunni rivals. The tensions threaten a relapse into the kind of sectarian bloodletting that drove Iraq to the brink of civil war a few years ago.

At least 18 people were killed when a suicide bomber driving an ambulance detonated the vehicle near a government office in Baghdad's mostly Shi'ite Karrada district, sending up a huge smoke cloud and scattering car parts into a kindergarten, according to police and health officials.

"We heard the sound of a car driving, then car brakes, then a huge explosion. All our windows and doors are blown out, black smoke filled our apartment," said Maysoun Kamal, who lives in a Karrada compound.

Police and security sources said there were more than 10 explosions across Baghdad, mostly targeting Shi'ite districts. A total of 194 people were wounded.

Iraqi officials linked the attacks to the current crisis.

"The timing of these crimes and the places where they were carried out confirm... the political nature of the targets," Maliki said in a statement.

The last American troops left OPEC oil-producer Iraq over the weekend, nearly nine years after the invasion that toppled Sunni dictator Saddam Hussein. Many Iraqis had said they feared a return to sectarian violence without a U.S. military buffer.

Upheaval in Iraq would have wider consequences in a region where a crisis in neighboring Syria is taking on a more sectarian tone, and Shi'ite Iran, Turkey and Sunni Arab Gulf nations are jostling for influence.

In the other Baghdad attacks, two roadside bombs struck the southwestern Amil district, killing at least seven people and wounding 21 others, while a car bomb blew up in a Shi'ite neighborhood in Doura in the south, killing three people and wounding six, police said.

More bombs ripped into the central Alawi area, Shaab and Shula in the north, all mainly Shi'ite areas, and a roadside bomb killed one and wounded five near the Sunni neighborhood of Adhamiya, police said.

An old woman wrapped in black yelled and called out for her husband, lost under the rubble, after two bombs struck a wholesale vegetable market where they both worked.

"I cannot find my husband, I don't know if they took him out or not, I don't know," she said.

Violence in Iraq has ebbed since the height of sectarian slaughter in 2006-2007, when suicide bombers and hit squads targeted Sunni and Shi'ite communities in continual attacks.

But the country is still fighting a stubborn, lower-grade insurgency waged by Sunni Islamists tied to al Qaeda and Shi'ite militias who U.S. officials say are backed by Iran.

No group claimed responsibility for Thursday's bombings, but analysts said Iraq's al Qaeda affiliate was probably hitting Shi'ite targets, as in the past, to inflame sectarian conflict and show it was still capable of major attacks.

"The perpetrators have sought to underline the fragile, sectarian balance of Iraq's political system," said Matthew Henman, analyst at Jane's Terrorism and Insurgency Centre.

SECTARIAN MAELSTROM

Just days after the U.S. withdrawal, Iraq's fragile power-sharing government is grappling with its worst turmoil since its formation a year ago. Shi'ite, Sunni and Kurdish blocs share out government posts in a unwieldy system that has been impaired by political infighting since it began.

Since its modern borders were mapped in 1920, Iraq has been a patchwork of sectarian and ethnic regions, from the mainly Shi'ite Muslim south to Sunni strongholds in the west and, more recently, the semi-autonomous Kurdistan region in the north.

Even before the crisis, Baghdad and Kurdistan were caught up in a growing dispute over control of some of the world's fourth-largest oil reserves. One dispute involves whether U.S. oil giant Exxon Mobil can operate in Kurdistan.

Sunni Muslim provinces near Saudi Arabia are also chafing against what they see as an increasingly authoritarian government in Baghdad that is interested only in promoting a Shi'ite Muslim agenda.

This week, Maliki called for the arrest of Sunni Vice President Tareq al-Hashemi on charges he organized assassinations and bombings, and he asked parliament to fire his Sunni deputy Saleh al-Mutlaq after he likened Maliki to Saddam.

Hashemi, who has denied the accusations, has taken refuge in Iraq's Kurdish region where he is unlikely to be handed over to the Shi'ite-led government in Baghdad.

Maliki on Wednesday warned Sunni leaders they would be excluded from power if they walked out of the ruling coalition, even as senior U.S. officials piled pressure on both sides for dialogue to end the crisis.

The moves against the senior Sunni leaders have fanned sectarian worries because Sunnis fear the prime minister wants to consolidate Shi'ite domination over the country.

Iraq's Sunni minority have felt marginalized since the rise of the Shi'ite majority in Iraq after the 2003 invasion. Many Sunnis feel they have been shunted aside in the power-sharing agreement that Washington touts as a young democracy.

(Additional reporting by Aseel Kami; Writing by Patrick Markey and Rania El Gamal; Editing by Mark Trevelyan)
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline jacob gold

  • Troll
  • General of the Army
  • *
  • Posts: 9200
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #9 on: December 22, 2011, 11:29:26 AM »
WOW!! A massive bomb. Now lets see - maybe a Sunni plumber, or a Shiite auto mechanic, or the Taliban, or Al Queda, or Bin Laden? Or maybe it's the jews?

Do you think if a tribal leader was to become popular and try and unite the Iraqis, that maybe be would be assasinated by a car bomb -- the same shiite plumber that did the bomb today. Isn't it odd that the Saudis never have any bomb attacks?

Offline laconas

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 13653
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #10 on: December 22, 2011, 04:37:57 PM »
WOW!! A massive bomb. Now lets see - maybe a Sunni plumber, or a Shiite auto mechanic, or the Taliban, or Al Queda, or Bin Laden? Or maybe it's the jews?

Do you think if a tribal leader was to become popular and try and unite the Iraqis, that maybe be would be assasinated by a car bomb -- the same shiite plumber that did the bomb today. Isn't it odd that the Saudis never have any bomb attacks?

It's always Jews, Jews, Jews with you. This is a civil between the freedom fighters and the terrorists. Don't you watch the news?
Nobody censors what they agree with

Offline FrankDialogue

  • Lieutenant General
  • ***
  • Posts: 5707
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #11 on: December 23, 2011, 10:18:50 AM »
It's always Jews, Jews, Jews with you. This is a civil between the freedom fighters and the terrorists. Don't you watch the news?

Actually, Jews don't have to be actively involved in any Iraqi terrorism.

The plan for Iraq was balkanization, dividing the country into competing/warring factions that would lead Iraq into civil war: Kurds in the North, Sunnis/Ba'athists in the middle; Shiites in the South...This has been accomplished...In addition, civil society and infrastructure has been decimated...Under Sadaam, there was unity, with religious differences respected, oil revenues more equally shared, and a prosperous secular society...This was unacceptable to Israel in particular because a successful secular Arab country is a threat.

Forces have been let loose in Iraq that accomplish Zionist aims by proxy.

Offline laconas

  • Veteran
  • *
  • Posts: 13653
  • Karma: +0/-0
    • View Profile
- 'Iraq at loss over US forces absence'
« Reply #12 on: December 23, 2011, 11:55:13 AM »
Actually, Jews don't have to be actively involved in any Iraqi terrorism.

The plan for Iraq was balkanization, dividing the country into competing/warring factions that would lead Iraq into civil war: Kurds in the North, Sunnis/Ba'athists in the middle; Shiites in the South...This has been accomplished...In addition, civil society and infrastructure has been decimated...Under Sadaam, there was unity, with religious differences respected, oil revenues more equally shared, and a prosperous secular society...This was unacceptable to Israel in particular because a successful secular Arab country is a threat.

Forces have been let loose in Iraq that accomplish Zionist aims by proxy.

You're probably right, the next plan is to split Iraq into 3 pieces.
Nobody censors what they agree with