Author Topic: What Jewry did to the Germans  (Read 2861 times)

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Offline WaltDisney

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What Jewry did to the Germans
« on: December 03, 2011, 07:44:41 AM »
<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/VpSMlyDgFrE&amp;feature=related" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/VpSMlyDgFrE&amp;feature=related</a>
"I hardly exaggerate. Jewish life consists of two elements: Extracting money and protesting."
-Nahum Goldmann, Ex-President of the World Jewish Congress

Offline jacob gold

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #1 on: December 03, 2011, 10:41:12 AM »
So by 1933 the Jews controlled 70% of the Judges  ..... Fast Forward to 2011 America and see the Jews control here. Just on the Supreme Court -  Sotomayor, Ginsberg, Kagan, Breyer, Alietto, and let's not forget the cryptos.

Now comes the financial crises

Offline WaltDisney

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #2 on: December 03, 2011, 12:25:20 PM »
So by 1933 the Jews controlled 70% of the Judges  ..... Fast Forward to 2011 America and see the Jews control here. Just on the Supreme Court -  Sotomayor, Ginsberg, Kagan, Breyer, Alietto, and let's not forget the cryptos.

Now comes the financial crises

Its Weimar all over again.

Those that dont learn from history....



And it is/was so easy to see it coming.

Im not even that bright, was hardly paying attention,  and I saw it clearly 8 years ago.
"I hardly exaggerate. Jewish life consists of two elements: Extracting money and protesting."
-Nahum Goldmann, Ex-President of the World Jewish Congress

Offline clefty

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #3 on: December 03, 2011, 12:33:14 PM »
Its Weimar all over again.

Those that dont learn from history....



And it is/was so easy to see it coming.

Im not even that bright, was hardly paying attention,  and I saw it clearly 8 years ago.

ok so here's what we gotta do...

blame the joos, round them up,

invade one country then another than another, start a multi front war that bankrupts us and kills millions of our best and brightest

and establish one world state...for justice...

oh wait that is the plan...


Offline Sue

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2011, 01:35:04 PM »
History repeats itself...

The world bankers are doing it again with the New World Order. Making profit with the blood of our military / veterans. When will you wake up America to the filthy criminals in Washington DC ? .. Puppets for the New World Order.



Does history repeat itself? Yes, but with different faces and names. We evolve technologically, but we remain emotionally the same people as those in ancient Rome and Egypt. We are not that different than them.

The relentless repetition of wars, the justice systems processing miscreants, the holidays we celebrate, it has a continuity to it that is echoed in diverse civilizations.

The obsession for power and wealth seeps through the ages. And after America has been sucked dry... they will move elsewhere.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline clefty

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2011, 03:16:16 PM »

the holidays we celebrate

"Coincident with the enacting of the Lisbon Treaty/EU constitution on December 1, Germany’s Constitutional Court has ruled that the nation’s capital must, like the rest of the country, abide by the law instituting Sunday as a day “of rest from work and of spiritual improvement” (Deutsche Welle, December 1). "

http://www.thetrumpet.com/?q=6782.5295.0.0

Offline Sue

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« Reply #6 on: December 03, 2011, 05:41:56 PM »
"Coincident with the enacting of the Lisbon Treaty/EU constitution on December 1, Germany’s Constitutional Court has ruled that the nation’s capital must, like the rest of the country, abide by the law instituting Sunday as a day “of rest from work and of spiritual improvement” (Deutsche Welle, December 1). "

http://www.thetrumpet.com/?q=6782.5295.0.0

As long as I can remember Sunday has always been the day of rest where I come from, but then, I left as a teenager. With the start of a booming economy and shift work things changed drastically, especially for all these double-income earners. 


"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline clefty

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2011, 07:52:47 PM »
As long as I can remember Sunday

 :) I wasnt expecting you would remember anything before egypt or rome ruled

I was just highlighting a common theme that runs throughout the ages despite the 

"different faces and names. We evolve technologically, but we remain emotionally the same people as those in ancient Rome and Egypt. We are not that different than them.

The relentless repetition of wars, the justice systems processing miscreants, the holidays we celebrate, it has a continuity to it that is echoed in diverse civilizations.

The obsession for power and wealth seeps through the ages. And after America has been sucked dry... they will move elsewhere. "

the unifying theme throughout this repeating history is quite simply worship of the sun...which contradicts the creator's laws

just saying...


Offline Sue

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« Reply #8 on: December 03, 2011, 07:59:17 PM »
Quote
The obsession for power and wealth seeps through the ages. And after America has been sucked dry... they will move elsewhere. "

Yes... and they have always moved on; Roman Empire, Germany, Russia now America. Next?

Although this empire is infinitely more powerful than Rome was, it will likely suffer the same fate.  For every negative action the empire commits, there's an equal and opposite good reaction. And the goodness of humanity will always defeat tyranny when it goes too far.  However, an empire with so much to lose will go down swinging and slinging every weapon in its arsenal, thus putting the final stamp on their status as most brutal empire in history.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline clefty

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #9 on: December 03, 2011, 08:30:48 PM »
Yes... and they have always moved on; Roman Empire, Germany, Russia now America. Next?

Although this empire is infinitely more powerful than Rome was, it will likely suffer the same fate.  For every negative action the empire commits, there's an equal and opposite good reaction. And the goodness of humanity will always defeat tyranny when it goes too far.  However, an empire with so much to lose will go down swinging and slinging every weapon in its arsenal, thus putting the final stamp on their status as most brutal empire in history.

next? its global baby...global state...and why the doom and gloom? its about setting up systems...

oh sure there will be bugs to work out at first but people will get used to it

here, read how a global system of time management was "adopted"...

there was resistance at first but ya know its such an efficient and convenient system

it makes just too much darn tootin good sense...


"Gregorian reform
 
The motivation of the Catholic Church in adjusting the calendar was to celebrate Easter at the time it thought the First Council of Nicaea had agreed upon in 325. Although a canon of the council implies that all churches used the same Easter, they did not. The Church of Alexandria celebrated Easter on the Sunday after the 14th day of the moon (computed using the Metonic cycle) that falls on or after the vernal equinox, which they placed on 21 March. However, the Church of Rome still regarded 25 March as the equinox (until 342) and used a different cycle to compute the day of the moon.[14] In the Alexandrian system, since the 14th day of the Easter moon could fall at earliest on 21 March its first day could fall no earlier than 8 March and no later than 5 April. This meant that Easter varied between 22 March and 25 April. In Rome, Easter was not allowed to fall later than 21 April, that being the day of the Parilia or birthday of Rome and a pagan festival. The first day of the Easter moon could fall no earlier than 5 March and no later than 2 April. Easter was the Sunday after the 15th day of this moon, whose 14th day was allowed to precede the equinox. Where the two systems produced different dates there was generally a compromise so that both churches were able to celebrate on the same day. By the 10th century all churches (except some on the eastern border of the Byzantine Empire) had adopted the Alexandrian Easter, which still placed the vernal equinox on 21 March, although Bede had already noted its drift in 725—it had drifted even further by the 16th century.
 
Worse, the reckoned Moon that was used to compute Easter was fixed to the Julian year by a 19 year cycle. However, that approximation built up an error of one day every 310 years, so by the 16th century the lunar calendar was out of phase with the real Moon by four days.
 
The Council of Trent approved a plan in 1563 for correcting the calendrical errors, requiring that the date of the vernal equinox be restored to that which it held at the time of the First Council of Nicaea in 325 and that an alteration to the calendar be designed to prevent future drift. This would allow for a more consistent and accurate scheduling of the feast of Easter.
 
The fix was to come in two stages. First, it was necessary to approximate the correct length of a solar year. The value chosen was 365.2425 days in decimal notation.[15] Although close to the mean tropical year of 365.24219 days, it is even closer to the mean vernal equinox year of 365.2424 days;[16] this fact made the choice of approximation particularly appropriate, as the purpose of creating the calendar was to ensure that the vernal equinox would be near a specific date (21 March). (See Accuracy).
 
The second stage was to devise a model based on the approximation which would provide an accurate yet simple, rule-based calendar. The formula designed by Aloysius Lilius was ultimately successful. It proposed a 10-day correction to revert the drift since Nicaea, and the imposition of a leap day in only 97 years in 400 rather than in 1 year in 4. To implement the model, it was provided that years divisible by 100 would be leap years only if they were divisible by 400 as well. So, in the last millennium, 1600 and 2000 were leap years, but 1700, 1800 and 1900 were not. In this millennium, 2100, 2200, 2300, 2500, 2600, 2700, 2900, and 3000, will not be leap years, but 2400, and 2800 will be. This theory was expanded upon by Christopher Clavius in a closely argued, 800 page volume. He would later defend his and Lilius's work against detractors.
 
The 19-year cycle used for the lunar calendar was also to be corrected by one day every 300 or 400 years (8 times in 2500 years) along with corrections for the years (1700, 1800, 1900, 2100 et cetera) that are no longer leap years. In fact, a new method for computing the date of Easter was introduced.
 
In 1577 a Compendium was sent to expert mathematicians outside the reform commission for comments. Some of these experts, including Giambattista Benedetti and Giuseppe Moleto, believed Easter should be computed from the true motions of the sun and moon, rather than using a tabular method, but these recommendations were not adopted.[17]
 
Gregory dropped 10 days to bring the calendar back into synchronization with the seasons. Lilius originally proposed that the 10-day correction should be implemented by deleting the Julian leap day on each of its ten occurrences during a period of 40 years, thereby providing for a gradual return of the equinox to 21 March. However, Clavius's opinion was that the correction should take place in one move, and it was this advice which prevailed with Gregory. Accordingly, when the new calendar was put in use, the error accumulated in the 13 centuries since the Council of Nicaea was corrected by a deletion of ten days. The last day of the Julian calendar was Thursday, 4 October 1582 and this was followed by the first day of the Gregorian calendar, Friday, 15 October 1582 (the cycle of weekdays was not affected).
 
Adoption
 
Though Gregory's reform was enacted in the most solemn of forms available to the Church, in fact the bull had no authority beyond the Catholic Church and the Papal States. The changes which he was proposing were changes to the civil calendar over which he had no authority. The changes required adoption by the civil authorities in each country to have legal effect.
 
The Nicene Council of 325 sought to devise rules whereby all Christians would celebrate Easter on the same day. In fact it took a very long time before Christians achieved that objective (see Easter for the issues which arose). However, the bull Inter gravissimas became the law of the Catholic Church. It was not recognised, however, by Protestant Churches nor by Orthodox Churches and others. Consequently, the days on which Easter and related holidays were celebrated by different Christian Churches again diverged.
 
Adoption in Europe
 
Only four Catholic countries adopted the new calendar on the date specified by the bull. Other Catholic countries experienced some delay before adopting the reform; and non-Catholic countries, not being subject to the decrees of the Pope, initially rejected or simply ignored the reform altogether, although they all eventually adopted it. Hence, the dates 5 October 1582 to 14 October 1582 (inclusive) are valid dates in many countries, but invalid in others.
 
Spain,[18] Portugal, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, and most of Italy implemented the new calendar on Friday, 15 October 1582, following Julian Thursday, 4 October 1582. The Spanish and Portuguese colonies adopted the calendar later because of the slowness of communication. France adopted the new calendar on Monday, 20 December 1582, following Sunday, 9 December 1582.[19] The Dutch provinces of Brabant, Zeeland and the Staten-Generaal also adopted it on 25 December of that year, the provinces forming the Southern Netherlands (modern Belgium) on 1 January 1583, and the province of Holland followed suit on 12 January 1583.
 
Many Protestant countries initially objected to adopting a Catholic invention; some Protestants feared the new calendar was part of a plot to return them to the Catholic fold.[20] In the Czech lands, Protestants resisted the calendar imposed by the Habsburg Monarchy. In parts of Ireland, Catholic rebels until their defeat in the Nine Years' War kept the "new" Easter in defiance of the English-loyal authorities; later, Catholics practising in secret petitioned the Propaganda Fide for dispensation from observing the new calendar, as it signalled their disloyalty.[21]
 
Denmark, which then included Norway and some Protestant states of Germany, adopted the solar portion of the new calendar on Monday, 1 March 1700,[22] following Sunday, 18 February 1700, because of the influence of Ole Rømer, but did not adopt the lunar portion. Instead, they decided to calculate the date of Easter astronomically using the instant of the vernal equinox and the full moon according to Kepler's Rudolphine Tables of 1627. They finally adopted the lunar portion of the Gregorian calendar in 1776. The remaining provinces of the Dutch Republic also adopted the Gregorian calendar in July 1700 (Gelderland), December 1700 (Utrecht and Overijssel) and January 1701 (Friesland and Groningen).
 
Sweden's relationship with the Gregorian Calendar was a difficult one. Sweden started to make the change from the Julian calendar and towards the Gregorian calendar in 1700, but it was decided to make the (then 11-day) adjustment gradually, by excluding the leap days (29 February) from each of 11 successive leap years, 1700 to 1740. In the meantime, the Swedish calendar would be out of step with both the Julian calendar and the Gregorian calendar for 40 years; also, the difference would not be constant but would change every 4 years. This system had potential for confusion when working out the dates of Swedish events in this 40-year period. To add to the confusion, the system was poorly administered and the leap days that should have been excluded from 1704 and 1708 were not excluded. The Swedish calendar (according to the transition plan) should now have been 8 days behind the Gregorian, but was still in fact 10 days behind. King Charles XII recognised that the gradual change to the new system was not working, and he abandoned it.
 
However, rather than proceeding directly to the Gregorian calendar, it was decided to revert to the Julian calendar. This was achieved by introducing the unique date 30 February in the year 1712, adjusting the discrepancy in the calendars from 10 back to 11 days. Sweden finally adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1753, when Wednesday, 17 February was followed by Thursday, 1 March. Since Finland was under Swedish rule at that time, it did the same.[23] Finland's annexation to the Russian Empire did not revert this, since autonomy was granted, but government documents in Finland were dated in both the Julian and Gregorian styles. This practice ended when independence was gained in 1917.
 

Britain and the British Empire (including the eastern part of what is now the United States) adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1752, by which time it was necessary to correct by 11 days. Wednesday, 2 September 1752 was followed by Thursday, 14 September 1752. Claims that rioters demanded "Give us our eleven days" grew out of a misinterpretation of a painting by William Hogarth. After 1753, the British tax year in Britain continued to operate on the Julian calendar and began on 5 April, which was the "Old Style" new tax year of 25 March. A 12th skipped Julian leap day in 1800 changed its start to 6 April. It was not changed when a 13th Julian leap day was skipped in 1900, so the tax year in the United Kingdom still begins on 6 April.
 
In Alaska, the change took place when Friday, 6 October 1867 was followed again by Friday, 18 October after the US purchase of Alaska from Russia, which was still on the Julian calendar. Instead of 12 days, only 11 were skipped, and the day of the week was repeated on successive days, because the International Date Line was shifted from Alaska's eastern to western boundary along with the change to the Gregorian calendar.
 
In Russia the Gregorian calendar was accepted after the October Revolution (so named because it took place in October 1917 in the Julian calendar). On 24 January 1918 the Council of People's Commissars issued a Decree that Wednesday, 31 January 1918 was to be followed by Thursday, 14 February 1918, thus dropping 13 days from the calendar.
 
The last country of Eastern Orthodox Europe to adopt the Gregorian calendar was Greece on Thursday, 1 March 1923, which followed Wednesday, 15 February 1923 (a change that also dropped 13 days).
 
Adoption in Eastern Asia
 
Japan replaced its traditional lunisolar calendar with the Gregorian calendar on 1 January 1873, but adopted the numbered months it had used in its traditional calendar in place of European names, and continued to use Gengo, reign names, instead of the Common Era or Anno Domini system: Meiji 1=1868, Taisho 1=1912, Showa 1=1926, Heisei 1=1989, and so on. The "Western calendar" (西暦, seireki) is also widely accepted by civilians and to a lesser extent by government agencies.
 
Korea adopted the Gregorian calendar on 1 January 1895 with the active participation of Yu Kil-chun.[24] Although the new calendar continued to number its months, for its years during the Joseon Dynasty, 1895–97, these years were numbered from the founding of that dynasty, regarding year one as 1392.[25] Between 1897 and 1910, and again from 1948 to 1962 Korean era names were used for its years. Between 1910 and 1945, when Korea was under Japanese rule, Japanese era names were used to count the years of the Gregorian calendar used in Korea. From 1945 until 1961 in South Korea, Gregorian calendar years were also counted from the foundation of Gojoseon in 2333 BCE (regarded as year one), the date of the legendary founding of Korea by Dangun, hence these Dangi (단기) years were 4278 to 4294. This numbering was informally used with the Korean lunar calendar before 1945 but is only occasionally used today. In North Korea, the Juche calendar has been used since 1997 to number its years, regarding year one as the birth of Kim Il Sung in 1912.
 
The Republic of China (ROC) formally adopted the Gregorian calendar at its founding on 1 January 1912, but China soon descended into a period of warlordism with different warlords using different calendars. With the unification of China under the Kuomintang in October 1928, the Nationalist Government decreed that effective 1 January 1929 the Gregorian calendar would be used. However, China retained the Chinese traditions of numbering the months and a modified Era System, backdating the first year of the ROC to 1912; this system is still in use in Taiwan where the ROC government retains control. Upon its foundation in 1949, the People's Republic of China continued to use the Gregorian calendar with numbered months, but abolished the ROC Era System and adopted Western numbered years.
 
Adoption by Orthodox Churches
 
Despite all the civil adoptions, none of the national Orthodox Churches have recognised it for church or religious purposes. Instead, a Revised Julian calendar was proposed in May 1923 which dropped 13 days in 1923 and adopted a different leap year rule. There will be no difference between the two calendars until 2800. The Orthodox churches of Constantinople, Alexandria, Antioch, Greece, Cyprus, Romania, and Bulgaria adopted the Revised Julian calendar, so until 2800 these New calendarists would celebrate Christmas on 25 December in the Gregorian calendar, the same day as the Western churches.[citation needed] The Armenian Apostolic Church adopted the Gregorian calendar in 1923, except in the Armenian Patriarchate of Jerusalem where the old Julian calendar is still in use.[26][27]
 
The Orthodox churches of Jerusalem, Russia, Serbia, the Republic of Macedonia, Georgia, Poland and the Greek Old Calendarists did not accept the Revised Julian calendar, and continue to celebrate Christmas on 25 December in the Julian calendar, which is 7 January in the Gregorian calendar until 2100. The refusal to accept the Gregorian reforms also has an impact on the date of Easter. This is because the date of Easter is determined with reference to 21 March as the functional equinox, which continues to apply in the Julian calendar, even though the civil calendar in the native countries now use the Gregorian calendar.[citation needed]
 
All of the other Eastern churches, the Oriental Orthodox churches (Coptic, Ethiopian, Eritrean, and Syrian) continue to use their own calendars, which usually result in fixed dates being celebrated in accordance with the Julian calendar but the Assyrian Church uses the Gregorian Calendar as enacted by Mar Dinkha, causing a schism; the Ancient Assyrian Church of the East continues to use the Julian Calendar.[citation needed]
 
All Eastern churches continue to use the Julian Easter with the sole exception of the Finnish Orthodox Church, which has adopted the Gregorian Easter.[citation needed]"

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gregorian_calendar

so merry christmas and happy new year!

global justice is just around the corner!!
« Last Edit: December 03, 2011, 08:53:14 PM by clefty »

Offline Sue

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- What Jewry did to the Germans
« Reply #10 on: December 03, 2011, 10:14:05 PM »
next? its global baby...global state...and why the doom and gloom? its about setting up systems...

oh sure there will be bugs to work out at first but people will get used to it here, read how a global system of time management was "adopted"... there was resistance at first but ya know its such an efficient and convenient system

it makes just too much darn tootin good sense...

so merry christmas and happy new year!

global justice is just around the corner!!

The 'Global State' has been in the works for a long time.... Here is an article from Dubai - PO Box 6716 Dubai, UAE

THE STATE: The Coming Insurrection’

10 November 2011–7 January 2012

www.viatraffic.org

“It’s useless to wait-for a breakthrough, for the revolution, the nuclear apocalypse or a social movement. To go on waiting is madness. The catastrophe is not coming, it is here. We are already situated within the collapse of a civilization. It is within this reality that we must choose sides.”

—The Coming Insurrection

THE STATE presents a group exhibition, held at Traffic, which takes its title from the book ‘The Coming Insurrection’ (2007) by The Invisible Committee. The show is a continuation of ‘THE STATE’, a socio-historical journal & forum, and a symbolic transition from the last exhibition ‘Social/Antisocial?’, which dealt with socialization and the current state of people and behavior.

The exhibition is a response to the causes of discontent, namely mass injustice, corruption and greed in our societies and world at large. It calls for a paradigm shift of human expression, to prevent an emerging social condition. It is not a call to arms but an attempt to get people thinking about the global transmutation that surrounds them.

The Invisible Committee is the collective pen-name for a small group of French post- Situationist intellectuals and academics, who in 2007 authored The Coming Insurrection, and in 2008 were arrested in France on charges of terrorism. The Coming Insurrection is a commentary on contemporary society and the building revolt against governmental and economic oppression. It references collapsing economies, crashing monetary systems, corrupted democracies, environmental degradation, global crises, riots, protests and above all, a moral and social decay.

People all around the world have witnessed the collapse of a system, a disintegrating modern social order. Which may just be getting worse. As Mark Twain once said, ‘History does not repeat itself, but it does rhyme.’ Despite glimmers of hope for change, through the likes of Barack Obama’s 2008 political campaign, we are still in a dire state.

We have recently seen the revolutionary Arab Spring, American Fall, riots and looting in London, among other communal uprisings. ‘The inviolable laws of humanity dictate that you can only push a man so far before he has no choice but to fight back. People all over the world are almost at that breaking point. Many have already reached it.’

As Rami Farook, Emirati curator & social–historian, puts it “The works presented share the perspective of The Coming Insurrection and deal with reasons for the current social condition, illustrating examples of it, and providing remedies. Similar to the book, many of the works touch on aspects of the self, social relations, work, the economy, urbanity, the environment, and civilization, while searching for a social solution to the present. It is our duty as citizens, activists, mentors, monitors and advisors to raise a clamour to change the conditions. By being warned, the insurrection might be prevented. An uprising is one thing, a successful revolution is another.”

The Coming Insurrection includes works by the following artists: Allora & Calzadilla, Banksy, Ahmed Bouholaigah, Arnaud Brihay, James Clar, Wim Delvoye, Abdulnasser Gharem, Pascal Hachem, Rokni Haerizadeh, Aman Mojadidi, Jean-Luc Moulene, Hesam Rahmanian, Hamza Serafi, David Shrigley, Roman Signer, UBIK, Douglas White, Dan Witz and Akram Zaatari.

About THE STATE

‘THE STATE’ is a socio-historical journal and forum, documenting the state of the world today. It observes, documents and shares, presenting a platform for dialogue and exchange.  The inaugural exhibition at Traffic, ‘THE STATE’ (2010), questioned the socio-political state of fear post September 11th, followed by ‘Uppers & Downers’ (2011) which ran a commentary on the global economic condition from 2007–2010, with the city of Dubai as a focal point. The next installment was ‘Social/Antisocial?’, which dealt with socialization and the present state of people and behavior. The latest exhibition, ‘The Coming Insurrection’, is a response to the causes of discontent, namely mass injustice, corruption and greed in our societies and world at large. www.thestate.ae

www.viatraffic.org
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.