Author Topic: Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American  (Read 1882 times)

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Offline AngelOfLight

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Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« on: July 04, 2011, 10:10:23 AM »
Remembering Thomas Jefferson -
A Magnificent American
7-4-11
 
 "I believe that banking institutions are more dangerous to our liberties than standing armies. If the American people ever allow private banks to control the issue of their currency, first by inflation, then by deflation, the banks and corporations that will grow up around the banks will deprive the people of all property - until their children wake-up homeless on the continent their fathers conquered."  --Thomas Jefferson, 1802
 
Jefferson milestones...
 
 
At 5, began studying under his cousins tutor.
 
 
At 9, studied Latin, Greek and French.
 
 
At 14, studied classical literature and additional languages.
 
 
At 16, entered the College of William and Mary.
 
 
At 19, studied Law for 5 years starting under George Wythe.
 
 
At 23, started his own law practice.
 
 
At 25, was elected to the Virginia House of Burgesses.
 
 
At 31, wrote the widely circulated "Summary View of the Rights of British America " and retired from his law practice.
 
 
At 32, was a Delegate to the Second Continental Congress.
 
 
At 33, wrote the Declaration of Independence .
 
 
At 33, took three years to revise Virginia 's legal code and wrote a Public Education bill and a statute for Religious Freedom.
 
 
At 36, was elected the second Governor of Virginia succeeding Patrick Henry.
 
 
At 40, served in Congress for two years.
 
 
At 41, was the American minister to France and negotiated commercial treaties with European nations along with Ben Franklin and John Adams.
 
 
At 46, served as the first Secretary of State under George Washington.
 
 
At 53, served as Vice President and was elected president of the American Philosophical Society.
 
 
At 55, drafted the Kentucky Resolutions and became the active head of Republican Party.
 
 
At 57, was elected the third president of the United States .
 
 
At 60, obtained the Louisiana Purchase doubling the nation's size.
 
 
At 61, was elected to a second term as President.
 
 
At 65, retired to Monticello .
 
 
At 80, helped President Monroe shape the Monroe Doctrine.
 
 
At 81, almost single-handedly created the University of Virginia and served as its first president.
 
 
At 83, died on the 50th anniversary of the Signing of the Declaration of Independence.
John F. Kennedy held a dinner in the white House for a group of the brightest minds in the nation at that time. He made this statement: "This is perhaps the assembly of the most intelligence ever to gather at one time in the White House with the exception of when Thomas Jefferson dined alone."


When we get piled upon one another in large cities, as in Europe, we shall become as corrupt as Europe .  --Thomas Jefferson


The democracy will cease to exist when you take away from those who are willing to work and give to those who would not.  --Thomas Jefferson


It is incumbent on every generation to pay its own debts as it goes. A principle which if acted on would save one-half the wars of the world.   --Thomas Jefferson


I predict future happiness for Americans if they can prevent the government from wasting the labors of the people under the pretense of taking care of them.  --Thomas Jefferson


My reading of history convinces me that most bad government results from too much government.  --Thomas Jefferson


No free man shall ever be debarred the use of arms.  --Thomas Jefferson


The strongest reason for the people to retain the right to keep and bear arms is, as a last resort, to protect themselves against tyranny in government.  --Thomas Jefferson


The tree of liberty must be refreshed from time to time with the blood of patriots and tyrants.  --Thomas Jefferson


To compel a man to subsidize with his taxes the propagation of ideas which he disbelieves and abhors is sinful and tyrannical.  --Thomas Jefferson


http://www.rense.com/general94/jeffsn.htm
Judge me if you're with out sin!

Offline EyeBelieve

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- Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« Reply #1 on: July 04, 2011, 10:19:58 PM »
Remembering Thomas Jefferson -
A Magnificent American
7-4-11
 

I always liked visiting Monticello--very beautiful house & area--the tour shows his fascination with technology & gadgets. 

http://www.larouchepub.com/pr/2010/100621daily_bell.html
11. What do you think of Thomas Jefferson?

LaRouche: A complex figure, who was reliable while Benjamin Franklin lived, but a foolish Romantic as Secretary of State and later President, who came to his senses during the Presidency of Monroe.


Also from http://www.larouchepub.com/eiw/public/2006/2006_20-29/2006_20-29/2006-25/pdf/44-55_625_ecomachtools.pdf:

Early support for Whitney’s endeavor came not only from Oliver Wolcott, but also from Vice President Thomas Jefferson. Although Jefferson idealized an agricultural society, he believed in using the most advanced technology for that society. At his home, Monticello, he not only bought one of Whitney’s cotton gins, but he installed a nail-making machine and one of Oliver Evans’ completely mechanized flour mills, and later he purchased Evans’ powerful high-pressure steam engine.

At the time of the 1798 government contract for arms, Jefferson was looking for a way to implement a process of arms manufacture that he had seen when he was the American Ambassador to France from 1785 to 1789. After the defeat of France in the French and Indian War, French General Jean-Baptiste de Gribeauval, the Inspector General of Artillery, proposed that muskets be manufactured with interchangeable parts. The inspector of three French Royal Arsenals, Honore´LeBlanc, developed a method which resulted in at least an Library of Congress, Pendleton’s Lithography approximation of interchangeability. Jefferson had written to John Jay, asking that Congress be informed of the method and its possibilities. Jefferson attempted to bring LeBlanc to America, but did not succeed.

Offline pope daniel

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- Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2011, 12:12:40 PM »
pos freemason
Revelation 3:14 "To the angel of the church in Laodicea write: These are the words of the Amen, the faithful and true witness, the ruler of God's creation.

Offline EyeBelieve

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- Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« Reply #3 on: July 10, 2011, 09:09:04 PM »
pos freemason

So many of Founding Fathers were masons of course.  So should we have foregone the Revolution?

Offline Vidarr

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- Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« Reply #4 on: January 27, 2012, 01:00:47 AM »
This banning system obviously needs some work..

Offline clefty

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- Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« Reply #5 on: January 29, 2012, 05:45:50 AM »


 interesting painting

In May 1816, Adams wrote to Jefferson about the "restoration" of the Society of Jesus:

"I do not like the reappearance of the Jesuits.... Shall we not have regular swarms of them here, in as many disguises as only a king of the gipsies can assume, dressed as printers, publishers, writers and schoolmasters? If ever there was a body of men who merited damnation on earth and in Hell, it is this society of Loyola’s. Nevertheless, we are compelled by our system of religious toleration to offer them an asylum."

....

And then there’s the whole Catholic thing. "Indeed, Mr. Jefferson," he wrote two years earlier. "What could be invented to debase the ancient Christianism which Greeks, Romans, Hebrews and Christian factions, above all the Catholics, have not fraudulently imposed upon the public?" And in 1821 he asked, "Can a free government possibly exist with the Roman Catholic religion?"

http://www.americamagazine.org/blog/entry.cfm?blog_id=2&id=0648858A-5056-8960-323B1775EE542FD6


Thomas Jefferson replied to his predecessor:
 
 "Like you, I disapprove of the restoration of the Jesuits, for it means a step backwards from light into darkness...."
 
(The Power and Secret of the Jesuits, Rene Fulop-Miller, 390)


http://www.scribd.com/doc/30408550/Quotes-About-the-Jesuit-Order-From-Famous-People
 


Offline FrankDialogue

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« Reply #6 on: January 29, 2012, 10:42:09 AM »
A brilliant painting...As far as the Jesuits I don't share your POV...However,  I will be writing about what the Arch Diocese of Philadelphia has been up to the past few years.

Offline clefty

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« Reply #7 on: January 30, 2012, 03:29:39 PM »
A brilliant painting...As far as the Jesuits I don't share your POV...However,  I will be writing about what the Arch Diocese of Philadelphia has been up to the past few years.
the painting indeed is..

I didnt merely state my point of view but adam's and jefferson's

but yes I agree with them...

I recall how bismark was punished for ridding germany of jesuits and northern germany was also punished for it decimated and even still no real industrial capacity...all in southern catholic hands...ironic?

and even now the catholic EU schemes to force the germans to rebuild holy roman empire...

history also shows that as luther was "reforming" the germans actually wished to destroy to the root the intrusion of rome into their lives...they desired to destroy all church property etc and luther himself had to murder thousands and thousands of germans in an attempt to keep the racket alive...

history is indeed awash with the blood shed for germans to rule themselves and serve god as they saw fit...

time and time again germans wished to kill the joo who somehow followed the church whereever it spread and was given the "dirty" work of handling the money...and the church again sided against germans in protection of the joo...

rome defeated germany not with the sword but with its crucifix...crooked as it is


Offline clefty

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- Remembering Thomas Jefferson - A Magnificent American
« Reply #8 on: January 30, 2012, 05:17:38 PM »
As far as the Jesuits I don't share your POV...
how about abraham lincoln's

“This (civil war) would never have been possible without the sinister influence of the Jesuits. We owe it to Popery that we now see our land reddened with the blood of her noblest sons. Though there were great differences of opinion between the South and North, on the question of slavery, neither Jeff Davis nor any one of the leading men of the Confederacy would have dared to attack the North, had they not relied on the promise of the Jesuits, that, under the mask of Democracy, the money and the arms of the Roman Catholics, even the arms of France, were at their disposal if they would attack us.”

I pity the priests, the bishops and monks of Rome in the United States, when the people realize that they are, in great part, responsible for the tears and the blood shed in this war. I conceal what I know, on that subject, from the knowledge of the nation; for if the people knew the whole truth, this war would turn into a religious war, and it would at once, take a tenfold more savage and bloody character. It would become merciless as all religious wars are. It would become a war of extermination on both sides. The Protestants of both the North and the South would surely unite to exterminate the priests and the Jesuits, if they could hear what Professor Morse has said to me of the plots made in the very city of Rome to destroy this Republic, and if they could learn how the priests, the nuns, and the monks, which daily land on our shores, under the pretext of preaching their religion, instructing the people in their schools, taking care of the sick in the hospitals, are nothing else but the emissaries of the Pope, of Napoleon, and the other despots of Europe, to undermine our institutions, alienate the hearts of our people from our constitution, and our laws, destroy our schools, and prepare a reign of anarchy here as they have done in Ireland, in Mexico, in Spain, and wherever there are any people who want to be free."

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #9 on: February 05, 2012, 12:11:28 AM »


how about abraham lincoln's

“This (civil war) would never have been possible without the sinister influence of the Jesuits. We owe it to Popery that we now see our land reddened with the blood of her noblest sons. Though there were great differences of opinion between the South and North, on the question of slavery, neither Jeff Davis nor any one of the leading men of the Confederacy would have dared to attack the North, had they not relied on the promise of the Jesuits, that, under the mask of Democracy, the money and the arms of the Roman Catholics, even the arms of France, were at their disposal if they would attack us.”

I pity the priests, the bishops and monks of Rome in the United States, when the people realize that they are, in great part, responsible for the tears and the blood shed in this war. I conceal what I know, on that subject, from the knowledge of the nation; for if the people knew the whole truth, this war would turn into a religious war, and it would at once, take a tenfold more savage and bloody character. It would become merciless as all religious wars are. It would become a war of extermination on both sides. The Protestants of both the North and the South would surely unite to exterminate the priests and the Jesuits, if they could hear what Professor Morse has said to me of the plots made in the very city of Rome to destroy this Republic, and if they could learn how the priests, the nuns, and the monks, which daily land on our shores, under the pretext of preaching their religion, instructing the people in their schools, taking care of the sick in the hospitals, are nothing else but the emissaries of the Pope, of Napoleon, and the other despots of Europe, to undermine our institutions, alienate the hearts of our people from our constitution, and our laws, destroy our schools, and prepare a reign of anarchy here as they have done in Ireland, in Mexico, in Spain, and wherever there are any people who want to be free."

The past couple of years I've been wondering if Founding Father-type quotations (like this) in re Jews, Catholics, money etc aren't often apocryphal.  They're often plausible enough.  OTOH a bit weird Lincoln lumps Napoleon with Catholics.  The Jesuit issue certainly deserves attention though.  Many people including some Catholics have strong doubts about the Jesuits.