Author Topic: * World's Coolest Buildings  (Read 15738 times)

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Offline wag

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #20 on: March 13, 2011, 07:16:27 AM »


Not a building but a cool civil engineering thing - Atlantropa. 
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Offline Zampan0

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #21 on: March 13, 2011, 08:06:51 AM »
cozy cottage with a nice yard and birds...? dont dream it, be it!  *removes silver spoon from mouth*
I'm guessing silver plate.

I could post and maybe I will my 14 month away being paid for at todays prices $450,000.00 ranch home with a park like yard and as much acerage has your quaint cottage, and maybe I will.  Probably not, because one can capture any home from the net.  All I can say is enjoy while you have it.  Too bad it's so close to the worst part of the gulf,  I wouldn't give you $5000.00 for it because of it's location.



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Offline jewbacca

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #22 on: March 13, 2011, 08:38:06 AM »
i'm about 700 miles from the gulf as the crow flies (mid mo ozarks) so it could be worse.
russian report says the entire eastern portion of usa is done for:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=389x8421977
may have to eventually bug out to the folks' couch in sili valley
so i can die in the big one instead. :-\

Offline FrankDialogue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #23 on: March 13, 2011, 09:31:51 AM »
i'm about 700 miles from the gulf as the crow flies (mid mo ozarks) so it could be worse.
russian report says the entire eastern portion of usa is done for:
http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=view_all&address=389x8421977
may have to eventually bug out to the folks' couch in sili valley
so i can die in the big one instead. :-\

Man, you are blessed to have a spot like that...The Ozarks are beautiful...Don't bug out anywhere...No 'big one' is coming to where you are.

Offline AngelOfLight

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #24 on: March 13, 2011, 05:25:33 PM »

That's a mega project there wag!! I wonder if it will ever happen? Old legends do talk of Ox crossing from Syria to Crete!



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Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #25 on: March 13, 2011, 09:31:24 PM »
Atlantropa - interesting project, this looks like quite an undertaking. 

Part 1



Part 2




http://bigthink.com/ideas/21339

Herman Sörgel’s Atlantropa is the craziest, most megalomaniacal scheme from the 20th century you never heard of.

Sörgel (1885-1952) was a renowned German architect of the Bauhaus school, and a philosopher reflecting on culture, space and geopolitics. On the future’s horizon, he saw the emergence of three global superpowers, one uniting the American continent, another a Pan-Asian block, and Europe – possibly the weakest of the three.

His solution was to engineer Europe out of its problems. Sörgel based his solution for Pan-European power and self-sufficiency on the observation that, although significant amounts of water flow into the Mediterranean through the Strait of Gibraltar (from the Atlantic Ocean) and the Dardanelles (from the Black Sea), its level stays the same, through evaporation. Hence his proposal to dam the Mediterranean at both ends, using the reduced inflow to generate massive amounts of hydroelectricity (110,000 Megawatt via several dams, of which 50,000 MW via the Gibraltar dam alone) and in the process create new land, which not only could be used for colonisation, but would also connect Europe to Africa. Thus would be created a new supercontinent, Atlantropa (giving the former easy access to the latter’s raw materials).

Sörgel first publicised his ideas in his 1929 book Mittelmeer-Senkung, Sahara-Bewässerung, Panropaprojekt (‘Lowering the Mediterranean, Irrigating the Sahara: the Panropa Project’), reiterating and specifying them in Atlantropa (1932). Later versions of the project included plans to create a series of giant lakes in Central Africa (Sörgel’s father, significantly, pioneered hydroelectricity in Bavaria).

Sörgel, as a visionary pacifist, had noble motives and his ideas were not without merit, but the logistics of the project were daunting. He saw cheap hydroelectricity as the answer to a future in which non-renewable energy sources such as coal, gas and oil would dwindle to depletion; he thought colonising new lands in the Mediterranean would give European nations a positive focus towards cooperation and help avoid another war. The growth of industry and agriculture would thus be safeguarded. And the land reclamation of parts of the Mediterranean seafloor would mirror, on a much larger scale, the centuries-old communal struggle of Holland against the North Sea. It would also provide another outlet for Napoleon’s vision of forging a peaceful European Union through the joint colonisation of Europe’s East (an idea no doubt constructed to co-justify Napoleon’s Russia campaign of 1812). The massive works would go on for more than a century, eliminating unemployment for generations.

But consider what was to be the lynchpin of Atlantropa, the Gibraltar dam. At its narrowest, the Strait of Gibraltar is 14 km (9 mi) wide. And yet, for some reason, Sörgel decided the dam should be built 30 km further inside the Mediterranean, where it would have to be significantly longer. The foundations for the dam would have to be 2.5 km wide, and 300 m high. To complete, it would take 10 years, and 200,000 workers, labouring in 4 continuous shifts. The dam would be crowned by a 400 meter high tower. Calculations at the time cast doubt on whether there would be enough concrete in the world to complete the gargantuesque project.

And consider what would happen to the Mediterranean, cut in two by the lower sea levels, with Sicily connected to both Tunisia and the Italian mainland (allowing, among other things for a regular train service between Berlin and Cape Town). In the western half, the water would be lowered by 100 meters, in the eastern half by as much as 200 meters, combining to create 576,000 km2 new dry land, a fifth of the Mediterranean’s surface, or more than the surface of Belgium and France together. Imagine the problems and traumas this would create for coastal cities such as Marseille or Genoa. Sörgel did propose the construction of new harbours, and did provide a special solution for Venice: another dam would safeguard its lagoon from drying out. But that lagoon would be a lake, 500 km away from the nearest seashore.

Sörgel’s plan would be considered outdated today for more reasons than just its megalomania. It was also completely eurocentric, proposing a Euro-African continent entirely run by and for the benefit of Europe(ans), Africa(ns) being reduced to supplying raw materials (he also saw a strong Atlantropa, also controlling the Middle East, as a bulwark against the ‘Yellow Peril’). Furthermore, there was totally no regard for its ecological impact (the increased salinity of the remaining Mediterranean Seas would have killed off much of the flora and fauna, the precipitation patterns could shift dramatically). And one shudders to think what would happen if the giant Gibraltar dam would be breached by a tsunami, an earthquake or a terrorist attack.

Despite his pacifist leanings, Sörgel attempted to reformulate his ideas in a way more favourable to the national-socialist world view. In 1938, he wrote Die drei grossen A: Amerika, Atlantropa, Asien – Grossdeutschland un italienisches Imperium, die Pfeiler Atlantropas (‘The Three Big A’s: America, Atlantropa, Asia – Greater Germany and the Italian Empire, the Pillars of Atlantropa’), and in 1942 the equally Lebensraum-ish Atlantropa-ABC: Kraft, Raum, Brot (‘Atlantropa ABC: Strength, Space, Bread’).
Sörgel’s ideas never caught on with the Nazis, whose expansionist plans were oriented more towards the East than towards the South. The idea therefore survived the Second World War, but was eventually rendered moot by the advent of nuclear power and the end of colonialism.
Sörgel kept defending his ideas literally to the death: in 1952, he was hit and killed by a car while biking to hold a speech on his Atlantropa project, the dream of which died a slow death after his own. In 1960, the Atlantropa Institute was closed. Although Atlantropa never came close to realisation, or maybe because of it, the concept did gain some currency in science fiction circles. A few examples:
• Soviet SF writer Grigory Grebnev’s ‘The Flying Station’ (1950) describes a future in which the Socialist Revolution has triumphed, but small groups of Neo-Nazis hiding near the North Pole are conspiring to destroy the Revolution’s most precious project, a Gibraltar dam.
• Philip K. Dick’s ‘The Man in the High Castle’ (1962) mentions in passing the draining of the Mediterranean by the victorious Nazis (as well as their genocide on Africans).

Thanks to Marc Itschner and Sebastian Castañiza for informing me of the Atlantropa project and of this map (in German), showing its Mediterranean component, which can be found on the relevant Wikipedia page. It shows (in the upper left corner) Venice, connected via a canal to the Mediterranean, and (in the upper right corner) the Sea of Marmara with dam and power station, (in the lower left corner) the main dam and power station at Gibraltar, (in the lower middle of the map) a second dam at Sicily to facilitate the differentiated lowering of the eastern Mediterranean’s sea level and (in the lower right corner) an extension of  the Suez Canal. The legend indicates planned rail links, planned irrigation areas through desalinisation plants, and amount of land reclaimed (in kilometers).

The second map of the ‘African’ part of the project can be found here, on a page called Xefer. It shows the African interior dominated by a few huge, artificial lakes: Lake Chad hypertrophied into the Chad Sea, reaching deep into the Sahara, its overflow connected to the Mediterranean, but also connected via the Ubangi Overflow to a titanic Congo Lake, created by damming the Congo River and flooding most of Congo’(s interior.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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- Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #26 on: June 01, 2011, 03:51:31 PM »


Not a building but a cool civil engineering thing - Atlantropa.

That is cool indeed, Wag!
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline fireball999

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- * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #27 on: June 01, 2011, 04:52:00 PM »


Polish architect of the Crooked House, Szotynscy Zaleski, was inspired by the fairytale illustrations of Jan Marcin Szancer and the drawings of the Swedish artist and Sopot resident Per Dahlberg. The most photographed building in Poland, the 4,000 square meter house is located in Rezydent shopping center in Sopot, Poland.

Offline amalgamy

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« Reply #28 on: June 01, 2011, 06:24:03 PM »
My brother lives in Shanghai....here's his building.  Ernst and Young, Shanghai Financial Center.

Better known as "The Bottle Opener."


Offline fireball999

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« Reply #29 on: June 03, 2011, 07:05:33 AM »
My brother lives in Shanghai....here's his building.  Ernst and Young, Shanghai Financial Center.

Better known as "The Bottle Opener."



Such a neat building! Must be cool to visit you friend?



This building is found in Kuwait. Mind blowing, huh?

Offline Vidarr

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« Reply #30 on: June 03, 2011, 10:48:18 AM »

Jewish Museum Berlin, Germany

Architect: Daniel Libeskind

Why It’s Cool Grotesque obnoxiuos :  There are twisting halls, angled floors, and rooms whose windows are diagonal slits. Outside in the “Garden of Exile,” 49 olive-tree-topped columns tilt 12 degrees sideways by the addition’s sharply pointed walls, which from above suggest pieces of a Star of David. Disorientation is the desired effect,

Disorientation of the gentile masses is the desired effect of the holohoax  and this building symbolizes the twisting and turning and complete nonsense to achieve it . It symbolizes the jewish psyche... crooked. 

Jewish architecture overall is recognized by their lack of creativity .. it's just blocks with some bling shine to it.. and if their creativity is really peaking they might just put a twist in that block...
kindergarten level..


 

This banning system obviously needs some work..

Offline Sue

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« Reply #31 on: June 03, 2011, 12:41:32 PM »


Polish architect of the Crooked House, Szotynscy Zaleski, was inspired by the fairytale illustrations of Jan Marcin Szancer and the drawings of the Swedish artist and Sopot resident Per Dahlberg. The most photographed building in Poland, the 4,000 square meter house is located in Rezydent shopping center in Sopot, Poland.

OMG - I hope there is no bar across the street, can you imagine walking out of there after ONLY one drink?  ;D
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #32 on: February 08, 2013, 06:52:36 PM »
Big, Bold, and Buzz-Worthy Buildings in 2012

AD spotlights a dozen showstopping architectural projects around the world that people will be talking
about this year—and beyond—Text by Josephine Minutillo


DNB Headquarters in Oslo by MVRDV

For nearly 20 years, the Dutch firm MVRDV has created bold, often boldly geometric projects. Its headquarters for the Norwegian financial group DNB in the fast-developing Bjørvika neighborhood on Oslo’s waterfront is no exception. “The building is basically a large box of Legos,” says MVRDV principal Winy Maas. “Shuffling individual components of the block slightly allows for more natural light inside. Removing some elements and adding others elsewhere creates fantastic outside spaces. This play leads to an unexpected, complex structure.”

Rendering courtesy of MVRDV

"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #33 on: February 08, 2013, 10:45:21 PM »
The building is basically a large box of Legos

Too bad that current Lego sets are $$ imagination-destroying toys that readily fall apart.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #34 on: February 09, 2013, 02:19:05 PM »
Too bad that current Lego sets are $$ imagination-destroying toys that readily fall apart.

Lego sets kept our boys busy, they loved creating things, imagination had no bounds.


"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #35 on: February 10, 2013, 08:02:08 PM »
Lego sets kept our boys busy, they loved creating things, imagination had no bounds.

Lego has changed a lot:  old sets were building blocks that encouraged creativity; new sets are designed to create a specific object only, usually with commercial ties to movies/tv shows.  One follows step-by-step directions with no imagination at all.  & when the object is constructed it's too delicate to actually play with.  I know folks who have spent $100's on these new-type Lego sets:  to the kids it's a phase that they quickly get bored with.  One can't even resell them since the hundreds of parts get mixed up or lost.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #36 on: February 10, 2013, 08:55:30 PM »
Lego has changed a lot:  old sets were building blocks that encouraged creativity; new sets are designed to create a specific object only, usually with commercial ties to movies/tv shows.  One follows step-by-step directions with no imagination at all.  & when the object is constructed it's too delicate to actually play with.  I know folks who have spent $100's on these new-type Lego sets:  to the kids it's a phase that they quickly get bored with.  One can't even resell them since the hundreds of parts get mixed up or lost.

EB, I have not looked at any new LEGO sets in a long time. My grandchildren inherited theirs from their parents who got the LEGO sets for birthdays and Christmas. They sure built up a storm... Many years of good imagination. Entertainment for 2 generations.

Nowadays they have their iPad's and other things that interest them more. 
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #37 on: February 10, 2013, 11:15:54 PM »

Nowadays they have their iPad's and other things that interest them more.

Kids absolutely flip for Ipads, it's really amazing.  I wonder if the whole Ipad thing isn't secretly a way to ensnare kids:  MSM raves about Ipads/tablets yet adults often still prefer laptops/notebooks for work stuff esp while traveling.  Of course Apple has long used schools to help push their products.  A friend has a 2-yr old boy who ignores "toys" in favor of the Ipad.  A nephew spends hours playing Ipad games, it's replaced Lego for him; somehow the Ipad simplicity is very appealing to kids who don't mind the very repetitive nature of Ipad vs PC games.

Offline laconas

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« Reply #38 on: February 11, 2013, 06:43:25 AM »
Kids absolutely flip for Ipads, it's really amazing.  I wonder if the whole Ipad thing isn't secretly a way to ensnare kids:  MSM raves about Ipads/tablets yet adults often still prefer laptops/notebooks for work stuff esp while traveling.  Of course Apple has long used schools to help push their products.  A friend has a 2-yr old boy who ignores "toys" in favor of the Ipad.  A nephew spends hours playing Ipad games, it's replaced Lego for him; somehow the Ipad simplicity is very appealing to kids who don't mind the very repetitive nature of Ipad vs PC games.

In a generation 99.9% all paper books will be replaced by tablets.
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Offline Sue

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« Reply #39 on: February 11, 2013, 08:02:55 AM »
Kids absolutely flip for Ipads, it's really amazing.  I wonder if the whole Ipad thing isn't secretly a way to ensnare kids:  MSM raves about Ipads/tablets yet adults often still prefer laptops/notebooks for work stuff esp while traveling.  Of course Apple has long used schools to help push their products.  A friend has a 2-yr old boy who ignores "toys" in favor of the Ipad.  A nephew spends hours playing Ipad games, it's replaced Lego for him; somehow the Ipad simplicity is very appealing to kids who don't mind the very repetitive nature of Ipad vs PC games.

It is appealing to me and very user-friendly. I have an Apple Mac Desktop (bought in 2011) and love it. I use Fire Fox rather than Internet Explorer.

Kids take to computers like ducks take to water!  :)

"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.