Author Topic: * World's Coolest Buildings  (Read 15513 times)

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Offline Sue

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* World's Coolest Buildings
« on: March 11, 2011, 07:19:46 AM »

30 St. Mary Axe, London

Why It’s Cool: In recent years, London kept a somewhat low architectural profile, but the buildings it did add—like this glittering office tower, nicknamed “the Gherkin” for its cucumber dimensions—exude panache. Diagonally striped bands of two shades of blue run almost the length of St. Mary’s 41 stories, which taper to a point. The triangular panes, of some 260,000 square feet of glass, form a captivating one-of-a-kind mosaic. And workers can crank them open for breezes, which wins this edifice points for greenness, too.


Auditório Ibirapuera, Sao Paolo, Brazil

Architect: Oscar Niemeyer

Why It’s Cool: The United Nations co-designer conceived the Auditório Ibirapuera in 1951 for Sao Paolo’s 400th anniversary, but it wasn’t completed until 2005, after $12.8 million in funding materialized. (Fortunately, Niemeyer lived to see it—he’s now 101 years old.) Still, modernity hasn’t tempered the building’s offbeat, utopian spirit. With a doorstop shape and a wiggling tongue of a red-metal marquee, the venue also features a 60-foot-wide backstage panel that can open to allow for free outdoor concerts.


Taipei 101, Taipei, Taiwan

Architect: C.Y. Lee and Partners Architects

Why It’s Cool: For years, Taiwan, like much of eastern Asia, shunned skyscrapers over worries that earthquakes or typhoons might topple them. But new, high-grade mineral-flecked concrete that allows buildings to grow tall without sacrificing strength was put to ample use in this 2004 dart. At 1,667 feet, Taipei 101 is the planet’s tallest building—and will stay that way until Burj Dubai debuts later in 2009.


The New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York City

Architect: Kazuyo Sejima and Ryue Nishizawa/Sanaa

Why It’s Cool: Before the current bust, New York’s building binge was perhaps unequaled among Western cities. Breaking a tradition of using local talent, the city also signed up architects from overseas to freshen its look, such as this Japanese team, whose metallic 174-foot stack of six off-center boxes has no obvious peer. Inside the New Museum, tiny galleries eschew windows to maximize wall space, allowing for more art. And the brick-and-terracotta neighborhood visible from a seventh-floor terrace emphasizes the building’s fish-out-of-water status.


Turning Torso, Malmo, Sweden

Architect: Santiago Calatrava

Why It’s Cool: Frank Lloyd Wright used some guesswork to make sure Falling-water didn’t fall; today, computers do the heavy lifting. They also permit far fetched forms that may have once worked only on paper, such as this 2005 building, which makes a genre-defying 90-degree clockwise rotation as it rises. Like many recent horizon-altering structures, Turning Torso combines a mix of uses, which has been a sure way for development to get funded; in fact, the 656-foot high-rise, which is Scandinavia’s tallest, tucks offices on floors one through 10, and apartments above them, allowing in-house commutes.


Museum of Islamic Art, Doha, Qatar

Architect: I.M. Pei

Why It’s Cool: Packed with 1,200 years of sextants, silk carpets, and elaborately detailed pitchers, the Museum of Islamic Art dedicates only 10 percent of its space to galleries. Much else is left open, like a soaring 164-foot central atrium topped with a tiny round skylight that evokes the Cairo mosque on which the stone building was modeled. Alongside Doha’s partly built high-rises in a development-crazed region, the museum’s clean, elemental masses—which evoke an earlier Middle East—can seem quaint.


Jewish Museum Berlin, Germany

Architect: Daniel Libeskind

Why It’s Cool Grotesque: Despite an understandably grim Holocaust focus, the Jewish Museum Berlin’s 2001 addition has the logic of a carnival fun house. There are twisting halls, angled floors, and rooms whose windows are diagonal slits. Outside in the “Garden of Exile,” 49 olive-tree-topped columns tilt 12 degrees sideways by the addition’s sharply pointed walls, which from above suggest pieces of a Star of David. Disorientation is the desired effect, according to Libeskind, to echo what World War II–era Jews felt before being shipped to death camps.

A supreme insult! How about designing one for Palestine?


de Young Museum, San Francisco

Architect: Herzog & de Meuron

Why It’s Cool: Some architects try metal cladding, but these two nail it. At the four-year-old de Young, they skip traditional glass and steel for 950,000 pounds of perforated copper, which fog hasn’t yet turned green. The brown hue of the chunky nine-story tower, which rises from palms in Golden Gate Park, suggests a Mayan temple. Rooms, too, buck convention, with plenty of non-linear surfaces for Hudson River School landscapes. And ferns brush courtyard windows, which underscores the lush setting.


China Central Television Headquarters, Beijing

Architect: Rem Koolhaas/Office of Metropolitan Architecture

Why It’s Cool: No two layouts of its 55 floors are the same. Only the Pentagon is a larger office building. Even in a country pushing architectural boundaries, this squared-off doughnut seems dizzyingly unique. And next fall, visitors could stand on glass discs in a cantilevered floor and stare down 500 unencumbered feet to the street (though a February fire at the Mandarin Oriental hotel next door could push back the already-delayed opening). Of course, the design comes from Koolhaas, who’s one of the profession’s most original practitioners. Yet even he plays down its stature. “Amidst all the skyscrapers there, it’s relatively low,” said Koolhaas in 2006. “It will feel accessible.”


BMW Central Building, Leipzig, Germany

Architect: Zaha Hadid

Why It’s Cool: Modernism is a trend that shows no sign of ebbing—what else are those ubiquitous glass-walled apartments but takes on Philip Johnson’s 1949 Glass House?Current designers also still seem keen on creating factories like the BMW Central Building, whose mass-produced goods embody Modernism’s underlying aesthetic. But Hadid’s confection, which knits together three outlying workshops, seems less mechanical than organic. Grooves ridge the skin along smoothly contoured edges. Tear-shaped concrete piers below resemble bones. And the overhead conveyor belts hurriedly hauling car frames could be blood vessels.


Guggenheim Bilbao, Spain

Architect: Frank Gehry

Why It’s Cool: The first glimpse of Guggenheim Bilbao’s rippling titanium walls in 1997 was a game-changer. Never again would paintings be displayed in humdrum hallways. Indeed, museums from Denver to Davenport, Iowa, have tried to whip up a “Bilbao effect” so their own retooled buildings might become instant landmarks. Bilbao also spawned the term “star-chitect,” as Gehry became an overnight object of hero worship. Ever since, developers of condos, offices and power plants have rushed to hire star-chitects, so their high-wattage imprimatur could sell products.



Caltrans 7 District Headquarters Replacement Building, Los Angeles

Architect: Thom Mayne/Morphosis

Why It’s Cool: Despite both a cumbersome name and less-than-glamorous function—bureaucrats plan freeway repairs in 13 stories of offices—Mayne’s silvery hulk feels airy and fantastic. Eco-friendliness explains some of the cutting-edge appeal: The southern wall is covered by photovoltaic cells that transform sunlight into electricity. And the western side boasts double-thickness glass that keeps interiors cooler than single panes could, thus obviating the need for much air-conditioning.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #1 on: March 11, 2011, 05:00:15 PM »
What a hodgepodge of nonsense look at me buildings. Makes one wonder what architectural style the late 20thC., early 21stC. will be remembered for.

In 50 to 100 years from now will anybody invest the time and money to restore any of these buildings when the roof starts leaking, and they start falling apart? I don't think so.
« Last Edit: March 11, 2011, 05:05:57 PM by laconas »
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Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2011, 07:14:21 PM »
What a hodgepodge of nonsense look at me buildings. Makes one wonder what architectural style the late 20thC., early 21stC. will be remembered for.

In 50 to 100 years from now will anybody invest the time and money to restore any of these buildings when the roof starts leaking, and they start falling apart? I don't think so.

There is very little 'real' art these days. This is about the only photo that I don't mind, it has warm colors.

"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #3 on: March 11, 2011, 07:19:33 PM »


Some idiot at City Planning obviously approved this eyesore.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2011, 07:21:03 PM »
There is very little 'real' art these days. This is about the only photo that I don't mind, it has warm colors.



Good point. In our time lighting is cutting edge; the technology, availability, low cost, and techniques from Hollywood are really being applied.
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Offline laconas

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #5 on: March 11, 2011, 07:34:04 PM »


Some idiot at City Planning obviously approved this eyesore.

Quote
Caltrans 7 District Headquarters Replacement Building, Los Angeles

Architect: Thom Mayne/Morphosis

Why It’s Cool: Despite both a cumbersome name and less-than-glamorous function—bureaucrats plan freeway repairs in 13 stories of offices—Mayne’s silvery hulk feels airy and fantastic. Eco-friendliness explains some of the cutting-edge appeal: The southern wall is covered by photovoltaic cells that transform sunlight into electricity. And the western side boasts double-thickness glass that keeps interiors cooler than single panes could, thus obviating the need for much air-conditioning.

Way behind the times. A more elegant solution is going to be windows that look like windows but are also solar cells that generate electricity. We all like machines, but nobody wants to live in a machine. A major challenge at this time is to hide all the machinery: HVAC, electrical connections, and stuff like that. Do you remember stereo system from the 1970's?
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Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #6 on: March 11, 2011, 08:47:15 PM »
Good point. In our time lighting is cutting edge; the technology, availability, low cost, and techniques from Hollywood are really being applied.

Yes, it is indeed, in that respect we have come a long way, but classic beauty is all but lost.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #7 on: March 11, 2011, 09:06:53 PM »
Way behind the times. A more elegant solution is going to be windows that look like windows but are also solar cells that generate electricity. We all like machines, but nobody wants to live in a machine. A major challenge at this time is to hide all the machinery: HVAC, electrical connections, and stuff like that. Do you remember stereo system from the 1970's?

I am an architects daughter, I have honestly never seen anything as sterile this. My Dad would turn over in his grave.

1970's stereo system, yep I remember it well, we had a 1972 'Loewe Opta', top of the line, a timeless teak wood cabinet and a beautiful sound. We don't have it anymore, because we had it all built-in.... and then sold the house 11 years later.  :-\ 
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline AngelOfLight

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #8 on: March 11, 2011, 10:33:55 PM »
When the inspiration for todays generation comes from Picasso little wonder that we have such ugly shaped buildings being built around us.
Add to that the religious freaks of the Rabbi  Al Gore and you end up with what I call pornographic architecture!


The Aeroflot Building. D. Chechulin. 1934

In 1934, the attention of the whole world was focused on the fate of the crewmen of the ice-breaker "Chelyuskin", who were adrift on an ice-floe after the ship went down in the Sea of Chukotsk. In the summer of the same year Moscow greeted the courageous survivors and the pilots who had rescued them, and who were the first to be granted the "Hero of the Soviet Union" award. The new traditions of socialist life demanded the perpetuation of the memory of this outstanding feat in monumental form. The "Aeroflot" building, which was to be erected on the square beside the Byelorussky railway station, was planned by architect D. Chechulin as a monument to the glory of Soviet aviation. Hence the sharp-silhouette, "aerodynamic" form of the tall building and the sculpted figures of the heroic airmen A. Lyapidevsky, S. Levanevsky, V. Mîlîkîv, N. Kamanin, M. Slepnev, M. Vodopyanov, I. Doronin, crowning seven openwork arches, perpendicular to the main facade and comprising a distinctive portal. I. Shadr, the sculptor of the airmen's figures, took part in the project's design. The project was never realised in its original design or intention. Almost half a century later, the general ideas of the project were incorporated into the complex housing the Supreme Soviet of the RSFSR on thå Êrasnîðãåsnenskàóà Åmbankment (nîwadàós — Ñîvernment Íîuse).

Such a beautiful master piece would have blinded the dark eyes of communist vampires, so it was never finished.
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Offline laconas

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #9 on: March 12, 2011, 02:19:00 AM »
I am an architects daughter, I have honestly never seen anything as sterile this. My Dad would turn over in his grave.

1970's stereo system, yep I remember it well, we had a 1972 'Loewe Opta', top of the line, a timeless teak wood cabinet and a beautiful sound. We don't have it anymore, because we had it all built-in.... and then sold the house 11 years later.  :-\ 

Stereo systems in the 70's with tuners, equalizers, 8track player, cassette decks, turntable, and lots of huge speakers and wires really started to get ugly and intrusive. The problem was kinda solved with fewer and smaller components, and wireless speakers; today, the clutter problem is completely solved with the computer doubling as a home music player.

The stereo system is just on example of all the machines that are required in a modern building/home, but it illustrates the design problem of hiding machines and components such HVAC, alarms, communication cables, more electrical connections, and new fangled gadgets such as solar cells, windmills, and energy saving circulation systems. Whew!

Back to architectural form. Architectural schools today teach their students that any form is acceptable to emulate, whether it's a Pygmy hut, a Mayan temple, or a pre-Classical Egyptian pyramid(the latter has something to do with Masonry), but what is not acceptable is any Greco/Roman Classical form, European Christian form, or Renaissance form. Is it any wonder why all lists of so called beautiful buildings today, such as the one on this thread, always contain and lack the forms I just mentioned.

The natural flow of progress in architecture of G/R forms were castrated about 100 years ago by our new oligarchs in the same way G/R forms were castrated in the 4th Century post Emperor Constantine World. The forms in the latter case didn't make their comeback until 1,000 years later through the Italian Renaissance.

I'm not advocating rebuilding G/R temple forms, but rather a return to that philosophical thought and the enabling of the natural progression of this type of thought that was castrated about 100 years ago.

God: tell me who your God and I'll tell you who you are. G/R forms were based on the Pythagorean man is the center of the universe and not the hyphenated G-d with a dash. Heresy: the popular worship of Einstein/Rothschild divinities today do not allow the return of the natural progression of the development of Western art, and at this point, 3 generations after it was cut-off, its return in lifetime is not likely.

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Offline wag

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #10 on: March 12, 2011, 04:37:37 AM »
What a hodgepodge of nonsense look at me buildings. Makes one wonder what architectural style the late 20thC., early 21stC. will be remembered for.


The jokes about them (before or after they topple) and the jew universities that teach this utter crap.
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Offline wag

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #11 on: March 12, 2011, 04:51:07 AM »
Stereo systems in the 70's with tuners, equalizers, 8track player, cassette decks, turntable, and lots of huge speakers and wires really started to get ugly and intrusive. The problem was kinda solved with fewer and smaller components, and wireless speakers; today, the clutter problem is completely solved with the computer doubling as a home music player.

The stereo system is just on example of all the machines that are required in a modern building/home, but it illustrates the design problem of hiding machines and components such HVAC, alarms, communication cables, more electrical connections, and new fangled gadgets such as solar cells, windmills, and energy saving circulation systems. Whew!

Back to architectural form. Architectural schools today teach their students that any form is acceptable to emulate, whether it's a Pygmy hut, a Mayan temple, or a pre-Classical Egyptian pyramid(the latter has something to do with Masonry), but what is not acceptable is any Greco/Roman Classical form, European Christian form, or Renaissance form. Is it any wonder why all lists of so called beautiful buildings today, such as the one on this thread, always contain and lack the forms I just mentioned.

The natural flow of progress in architecture of G/R forms were castrated about 100 years ago by our new oligarchs in the same way G/R forms were castrated in the 4th Century post Emperor Constantine World. The forms in the latter case didn't make their comeback until 1,000 years later through the Italian Renaissance.

I'm not advocating rebuilding G/R temple forms, but rather a return to that philosophical thought and the enabling of the natural progression of this type of thought that was castrated about 100 years ago.

God: tell me who your God and I'll tell you who you are. G/R forms were based on the Pythagorean man is the center of the universe and not the hyphenated G-d with a dash. Heresy: the popular worship of Einstein/Rothschild divinities today do not allow the return of the natural progression of the development of Western art, and at this point, 3 generations after it was cut-off, its return in lifetime is not likely.



The ancient architecture was largely based on senary (base 6) mathematics,  which is still seen/used in aspects of English measurement system, time and angle measurement.  Using the senary system makes the angles and relationships used in the ancient architecture seem natural and not some mystical "golden" relationships when converted to base 10 decimal.  There's something about the ancient stuff the matches our natural aesthetic senses.  Today architecture is likely taught (I don't know for sure) without first instill the critical fundamental aspects that appeal to our inherent likings.  Also, today stuff is built without showing the structural engineering, which gets hidden underneath.  Hiding the support structure gives us an uncomfortable feeling, like walking through a valley where landslides look like they could happen any time.

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Offline laconas

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #12 on: March 12, 2011, 06:29:53 AM »
The ancient architecture was largely based on senary (base 6) mathematics,  which is still seen/used in aspects of English measurement system, time and angle measurement.  Using the senary system makes the angles and relationships used in the ancient architecture seem natural and not some mystical "golden" relationships when converted to base 10 decimal.  There's something about the ancient stuff the matches our natural aesthetic senses.  Today architecture is likely taught (I don't know for sure) without first instill the critical fundamental aspects that appeal to our inherent likings.  Also, today stuff is built without showing the structural engineering, which gets hidden underneath.  Hiding the support structure gives us an uncomfortable feeling, like walking through a valley where landslides look like they could happen any time.



It doesn't make sense, why would Jews be against the number 6?
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Offline wag

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #13 on: March 12, 2011, 09:25:59 AM »
It doesn't make sense, why would Jews be against the number 6?

Jews are only against us using the number 6.  They have exclusive rights.  There's a theory that 6 is their number because, in counting planets from outside in, mars is #6.  Earth is 7.  Jupiter is 5, the brightest "star" in the sky, giving us the typical five-pointed star form, mars gives us the star of david.  Earth is the divine.  This usage is seen on the ancient tablets, in the near east and the ancient culture of the Americas.  
« Last Edit: March 12, 2011, 06:53:23 PM by wag »
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Offline FrankDialogue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #14 on: March 12, 2011, 12:35:54 PM »
ULTIMA TOWER & X SEED 4000



There’s a lot of debate about what the tallest tower in the world currently is. Some say the Taipei 101, at 1671 ft to the tip of it’s spire, is the world’s tallest tower, whereas we might argue that the Sears Tower, at a whopping 1731 ft (and 110 stories), still takes the prize. However, if the enormous, 13,000 ft X-Seed 4000 structure ever gets built in Tokyo – it will win the worlds-tallest-building competition hands down and leave its puny competitors in the dirt.

Looking eerily like Mt. Doom in the above rendering, the mountain-like X-Seed 4000 represents a utopian eco-vision for a self-contained high-rise city in the Tokyo harbor – powered mainly by solar energy. Aesthetically inspired by nearby Mt. Fuji, the behemoth building would measure 13,123 feet tall with a 6 square-kilometer footprint, and could accommodate five hundred thousand to one million inhabitants
.




Unlike conventional skyscrapers, the X-Seed 4000 would be required to actively protect its occupants from considerable air pressure gradations and weather fluctuations along its massive elevation. Its design calls for the use of solar power to maintain internal environmental conditions. Some estimate that the cost to construct the X-Seed 4000 structure may be somewhere between US$300-900 billion.

We’re not saying it’s impossible, but for now, X-Seed 4000 seems like more of a utopian vision for contemporary green urban planning than a viable design solution.

http://inhabitat.com/self-contained-tokyo-highrise-eco-city-x-seed-4000/


<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/-yAWBsKd0a0?fs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/-yAWBsKd0a0?fs</a>

The Ultima Tower (Similar)



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/Ta9UgT5QBYw?fs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/Ta9UgT5QBYw?fs</a>


Me,  would prefer a cozy cottage with a nice backyard with trees and bushes and flowers and birds singing...Although I guess you could mimic that in one of these mega structures...I mean, I guess birds could live there.

« Last Edit: March 12, 2011, 12:45:59 PM by FrankDialogue »

Offline FrankDialogue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #15 on: March 12, 2011, 12:38:43 PM »
I like the 'Turning Torso' and the 'Museum of Islamic Art'...The California building made from copper is also interesting, as is the Chinese TV building.



<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/A86myAuIxqY?fs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/A86myAuIxqY?fs</a>
« Last Edit: March 12, 2011, 12:58:25 PM by FrankDialogue »

Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #16 on: March 12, 2011, 06:29:25 PM »
Heresy: the popular worship of Einstein/Rothschild divinities today do not allow the return of the natural progression of the development of Western art, and at this point, 3 generations after it was cut-off, its return in lifetime is not likely.

Good points, I have to agree with you, Laconas. People have been too brainwashed ever since WWI and WWII. The Internet could be our last hope, however, if truly any critical mass were to build, I think they would turn off the switch. Only social, commercial and propaganda sites would remain.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #17 on: March 12, 2011, 07:38:51 PM »
I like the 'Turning Torso' and the 'Museum of Islamic Art'...The California building made from copper is also interesting, as is the Chinese TV building.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/A86myAuIxqY?fs" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/A86myAuIxqY?fs</a>

Interesting viewing, good finds, Frank. All that technology is quite incredible and interesting, literally the sky is the limit...

Having said that, who really needs it all when our cities are in need of repair?

(What war in Libya?)  All eyes are on Japan.. Just imagine if the reactor blows up. Chernobyl was bad enough, and there was only one reactor ~ Japan has 6 of them.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline jewbacca

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #18 on: March 13, 2011, 07:00:40 AM »
cozy cottage with a nice yard and birds...? dont dream it, be it!






best of all: it didnt cost a penny (inheritance from granny).
(i can hear the groans from here.)
*removes silver spoon from mouth*

wrt hi fi, the tripath chip digital amps that have been popping up all over
are pretty impressive. not a lot of wattage oomph but brilliant detail and relatively cheap to boot.
puts my last big black box onkyo to shame.
http://www.tnt-audio.com/ampli/scythe_sda1000_e.html

listening to classical on kqac atm, even the 32k stream sounds pretty damn good.
http://www.allclassical.org/listen_help

radiosuisse classique and jazzradio.com are a couple other faves.

http://www.radiorow.com/stations/jazz.htm

http://www.radiorow.com/stations/jazz.htm

architecture wise john lautner was the apex of ...something.
http://www.infinitespacethemovie.com/index.html






Offline Zampan0

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Re: * World's Coolest Buildings
« Reply #19 on: March 13, 2011, 07:07:47 AM »
"Mamma may  have, pappa may have, but God Bless the Child that has His Own".  I've got news for you Andrew,  nobody with a lick of sense envies a trust fund boy.  I personally -on the whole- find them to be quite shallow.

« Last Edit: March 13, 2011, 07:10:34 AM by Zampan0 »
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