Author Topic: Great Books!  (Read 10325 times)

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Offline WaltDisney

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- Great Books!
« Reply #40 on: June 05, 2011, 10:27:59 AM »
I read both of Solzhenytsin's books over the winter, the one Fireball posted and the Gulag, talk about surviving Hell while freezing your butt off. Arthur Koestler's e-book is on the forum page, eventually I'll get to read it too.

I wanted all of these IN HARD BACK, on my shelf for all to read-friends, family etc

Solzhenitzyn is also on my shelf, the 2nd volume also belongs on everyones shelf.




I recently ordered Arthur Butz-The Hoax of the 20th Century
David Irvings- Nuremburg
Shlomo Sands-The Invention of the Jewish People
Arthur Koestlers- The 13th Tribe
The New Jerusalem, High Priests of War and Judas Goats by Michael C. Piper.
"I hardly exaggerate. Jewish life consists of two elements: Extracting money and protesting."
-Nahum Goldmann, Ex-President of the World Jewish Congress

Offline Sue

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« Reply #41 on: June 05, 2011, 10:57:27 PM »
Nice to have them in hard copy.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #42 on: June 06, 2011, 07:25:21 AM »
J D Salinger's

The Catcher in the Rye

This was one of my favorite books that I have ever read in my life. It was so interesting that you never wanted to put it down. ( below is background info in first paragraph and the other two are my version of what I remember about the book )

This book has been steeped in controversy since it was banned in America after its first publication. John Lennon's assassin, Mark Chapman, asked the former Beatle to sign a copy of the book earlier in the morning of the day that he murdered Lennon. Police found the book in his possession upon apprehending the psychologically disturbed Chapman. However, the book itself contains nothing that could be attributed with leading Chapman to act as he did - it could have been any book that he was reading the day he decided to kill John Lennon - and as a result of the fact that it was The Catcher in the Rye, a book describing a nervous breakdown, media speculated widely about the possible connection. This gave the book even more notoriety. So what is The Catcher in the Rye actually about?

Superficially the story of a young man's expulsion from yet another school, The Catcher in the Rye is in fact a perceptive study of one individual's understanding of his human condition. Holden Caulfield, a teenager growing up in 1950s New York, has been expelled school for poor achievement once again. In an attempt to deal with this he leaves school a few days prior to the end of term, and goes to New York to 'take a vacation' before returning to his parents' inevitable wrath. Told as a monologue, the book describes Holden's thoughts and activities over these few days, during which he describes a developing nervous breakdown, symptomised by his bouts of unexplained depression, impulsive spending and generally odd, erratic behavior, prior to his eventual nervous collapse.

However, during his psychological battle, life continues on around Holden as it always had, with the majority of people ignoring the 'madman stuff' that is happening to him - until it begins to encroach on their well defined social codes. Progressively through the novel we are challenged to think about society's attitude to the human condition - does society have an 'ostrich in the sand' mentality, a deliberate ignorance of the emptiness that can characterize human existence? And if so, when Caulfield begins to probe and investigate his own sense of emptiness and isolation, before finally declaring that he world is full of 'phonies' with each one out for their own phony gain, is Holden actually the one who is going insane, or is it society which has lost its mind for failing to see the hopelessness of their own lives?

When we are honest we can see within ourselves suppressed elements of the forces operating within Holden Caulfield, and because of that I would recommend this thought provoking novel as a fascinating and enlightening description of our human condition. However, beware... for that very reason it is not comfortable reading. This is true, but It's still a great read.


Offline FrankDialogue

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« Reply #43 on: June 06, 2011, 11:36:04 AM »


... When Caulfield begins to probe and investigate his own sense of emptiness and isolation, before finally declaring that he world is full of 'phonies' with each one out for their own phony gain, is Holden actually the one who is going insane, or is it society which has lost its mind for failing to see the hopelessness of their own lives?





Holden is getting a dose of reality, and society is just trying to escape from ugly reality...Neither party has lost their minds, only their souls.

Offline AngelOfLight

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« Reply #44 on: June 06, 2011, 12:25:09 PM »
Ja, I've heard good things about Fort...Here are a few good ones you may enjoy:



Published 1937, an extrapolation about God and the Universe



By Russell Banks; the movie by Atom Egoyan is even better...



Another by Banks...



Good introduction to Solzhenytsin

Thank you Frank, yes Fort was  a special person.
Judge me if you're with out sin!

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #45 on: June 08, 2011, 12:53:46 PM »
Affliction was actually a great book. I am just a constant book reader.

Offline caroline.carter

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« Reply #46 on: December 29, 2012, 01:57:55 AM »
Love the Jack Reacher books.

Offline Vidarr

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« Reply #47 on: January 01, 2013, 03:44:56 PM »
I recommend:


I see enough material to create an awesome role playing game.

This banning system obviously needs some work..

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #48 on: January 01, 2013, 08:43:15 PM »
I see enough material to create an awesome role playing game.

LaRouche highly recommends Cervantes as well as other classics like Shakespeare, Swift, Dante etc.