Author Topic: Great Books!  (Read 10058 times)

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Offline jewbacca

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #20 on: January 06, 2011, 08:45:53 AM »
hey chauncey, fellow karagarga member smedleybutler here,
gotta love cinemageddon too!

Offline AngelOfLight

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #21 on: January 17, 2011, 01:56:15 PM »
Judge me if you're with out sin!

Offline Chauncey G

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #22 on: February 04, 2011, 07:49:01 AM »

I was looking for a movie on youtube, in English, but it appears Hollywood never made a Don Quixote movie. Quite a few stage musicals though. This the closest thing I found, and it was made in Italy.


There is even a nazi version from 1933 by Pabst in English.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0023956/

You can download and watch it here
http://www.archive.org/details/DonQuixote


Offline fireball999

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« Reply #23 on: May 31, 2011, 07:04:35 AM »


This is such a great series. They are a teen section book, but more and more adults are starting to read them. The story is about a magical place that you can enter from a different location each book and you encounter new creatures every time. Creatures like fauns, elves, gargoyles and many more. Narnia is ruled by a lion named Aslan and each book has a different adventure. Two, four and five are the only books that have the same kids in them. They are a great read if you love fantasy.

Offline FrankDialogue

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« Reply #24 on: May 31, 2011, 08:00:54 AM »


Ja, I've heard good things about Fort...Here are a few good ones you may enjoy:



Published 1937, an extrapolation about God and the Universe



By Russell Banks; the movie by Atom Egoyan is even better...



Another by Banks...



Good introduction to Solzhenytsin

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #25 on: June 01, 2011, 07:27:31 AM »
I remember when I read H.G. Well's The Time Machine in grade 8. It was a really interesting book as it starts off in the early 1900's and you get to travel through the years to see events that have actually happened. Finally the main guy gets to a time really far in the future where we meet two news groups of people called the Eloi and the Moorlocks. The whole point is to get back to his own time. It was such an suspenseful read.



Offline fireball999

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« Reply #26 on: June 02, 2011, 08:22:54 AM »
Hmm...never heard of this Gone series. Sounds interesting.

I own a few of The X-Files books...some episodes & a few of the novels.  Also, the Nancy Drew & HArdy Boys series. :-[

I LOVE S. King's earlier works, everything from Carrie to the The Dark Tower Series. I've been reading his work since I was eight years or so. The Shining, IT, Gerald's Game were brilliant.

Horror fiction is a significant part of my reading. Select works of: Dean Koontz, H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe etc.

Really like fantasy-type, medieval sagas. A. A. Attanasio (Dominions of Irth trilogy, The Dragon & the Unicorn etc), David Gemmel's work (The Dark Prince), Terry Brooks' epics (the entire Shannara series), Barbara Hambley's trilogy with mercenary Sun Wolf & many more.

Classics: anything from: SHAKESPEARE, Dickens, Twain. Wilkie Collin's The Woman in White (his books should not be read on a tired mind), Orwell's 1984, R. L. Stevenson's Kidnapped, Treasure Island, naturally A. Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes series, Jules Verne, Anna Sewell's Black Beauty, Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers, Johanna Spyri's HeidiIsland of Dr Moreau, Moby Dick Baum's Wizard of Oz, , Hardy's Mayor of Casterbridge, Tess of D'Urbervilles, Henry James' stuff, Steinbeck's Of Mice & Men, Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, anything from Roald Dahl (BFG, Matilda, Witches), of course Jane Austen.

Can't recall them all...

All those other books sound interesting. I remember the hardy boy series too!

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #27 on: June 02, 2011, 05:07:53 PM »
It's really interesting, but I find a lot of adults (at least where I am from ) like to the read The Lord of the Rings. They are a fantasy series where many creatures are traveling across the land to recover a ring and defeat a dark lord, 3 books in the series and it was written by J.R.R Tolkien.

Interesting fact: Tolkien and C.S Lewis(Chronicles of Narnia) were great friends.



Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #28 on: June 02, 2011, 08:37:16 PM »
I remember when I read H.G. Well's The Time Machine in grade 8. It was a really interesting book as it starts off in the early 1900's and you get to travel through the years to see events that have actually happened. Finally the main guy gets to a time really far in the future where we meet two news groups of people called the Eloi and the Moorlocks. The whole point is to get back to his own time. It was such an suspenseful read.

As a youngster I read just about all of Wells' SF books.  Pretty entertaining & quick reads, among the shortest books AFAIK of the SF masters.  A reason for this?  re Wells deliberately seeking to maximize influence & also leave latitude for film & tv? 

OTOH I've read a lot of LaRouche who, fairly single-handedly, exposes Wells as a City of London agent:

The key to all of this is shown nakedly by Wells' perpetual drumming of the theme: "The nation-state, or anything like it must be destroyed" for the sake of whatever Wells' desire for seamless "globalization" might bring. On this recurring, thematic point in Well's The Open Conspiracy, he returns always to that theme, just as his partner in crime, Bertrand Russell, demanded a preventive nuclear assault on the Soviet Union, to bring about what Russell stated emphatically was the establishment of world government, as today in the attempted foisting of the Lisbon Treaty menaces continental European civilization, and also probably large-scale nuclear warfare against Russia and Asia during the relatively near term ahead

Current culture ignores that Wells had far more interests than simple SF; conversely we are told that Edgar Allan Poe was just a lame horror-writer when he actually was an intellectual patriot who offended the City (& probably led to his assassination) with his works true themes of human creativity.

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #29 on: June 02, 2011, 08:54:56 PM »
As a youngster I read just about all of Wells' SF books.  Pretty entertaining & quick reads, among the shortest books AFAIK of the SF masters.  A reason for this?  re Wells deliberately seeking to maximize influence & also leave latitude for film & tv? 

OTOH I've read a lot of LaRouche who, fairly single-handedly, exposes Wells as a City of London agent:

The key to all of this is shown nakedly by Wells' perpetual drumming of the theme: "The nation-state, or anything like it must be destroyed" for the sake of whatever Wells' desire for seamless "globalization" might bring. On this recurring, thematic point in Well's The Open Conspiracy, he returns always to that theme, just as his partner in crime, Bertrand Russell, demanded a preventive nuclear assault on the Soviet Union, to bring about what Russell stated emphatically was the establishment of world government, as today in the attempted foisting of the Lisbon Treaty menaces continental European civilization, and also probably large-scale nuclear warfare against Russia and Asia during the relatively near term ahead

Current culture ignores that Wells had far more interests than simple SF; conversely we are told that Edgar Allan Poe was just a lame horror-writer when he actually was an intellectual patriot who offended the City (& probably led to his assassination) with his works true themes of human creativity.

I agree, they were really short, but to me the length doesn't matter; but the storyline does because if it does not sound good, why read it? I remember studying Edgar Allen Poe in History class as well. Someone told me he wrote plays too. Is it true?

A prime example of a book that had a great storyline would be the Harry Potter series. Seven books, four to 7 were thick, but they were all still exciting to read. They were full of magic, love, sadness, battles and did i say magic? I still have them in my collection today!


Offline thomaspain

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« Reply #30 on: June 02, 2011, 10:01:53 PM »
Current culture ignores that Wells had far more interests than simple SF; conversely we are told that Edgar Allan Poe was just a lame horror-writer when he actually was an intellectual patriot who offended the City (& probably led to his assassination) with his works true themes of human creativity.

   These sci-fi writers are an amazing bunch. They are gifted with inspiration and imagination. Sci-fi has been my favorite read all my life. I remember when Hubbard came up with "Dianetics". We passed the paperback around page-by-page and then discussed it. He had some interesting ideas. I remember some of Kornbluth's intriguing stories, which I just recently identified as Jewish propaganda. The two I identified were: "The Little Black Bag" and "The Marching Morons". They seemed like NWO stories. I am looking for his: "The Syndic" on line.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #31 on: June 02, 2011, 11:15:43 PM »
   These sci-fi writers are an amazing bunch. They are gifted with inspiration and imagination. Sci-fi has been my favorite read all my life. I remember when Hubbard came up with "Dianetics". We passed the paperback around page-by-page and then discussed it. He had some interesting ideas. I remember some of Kornbluth's intriguing stories, which I just recently identified as Jewish propaganda. The two I identified were: "The Little Black Bag" and "The Marching Morons". They seemed like NWO stories. I am looking for his: "The Syndic" on line.

I read Dianetics IIRC from a library loan; some interesting stuff but much off the wall re engrams etc.  Hubbard was a true psychopath genius, scamming his way hither & yon.  Kinda dug his SeaOrg deal, sailing the waves on a huge yacht with a cadre of true believers; nearly untouched by laws.   I was willingly pulled in to the DC Scientology HQ to have a "personality test" done & they quickly decided I wasn't a good sucker,  :(  I almost wish I had played along a little better to see the results.  Kornbluth sounds interesting, haven't heard about him before.

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #32 on: June 03, 2011, 12:54:02 PM »
Here are my favorite Shakespeare Plays

Romeo and Juliet:
A story about two star crossed lovers whose families hate each other. Their love for each other is strong. If it will take death to be together, it will happen.




A Midsummer-Night's Dream: A story about A girl named Hermia who loves Lysander, Lysander and Demitrius both love Hermia, another girl named Helena loves Demitrius. It all gets mixed up thanks to some fairies. Will it get fixed?





Macbeth:
It is a tragedy about a man named Macbeth who wants to be King. When he finally does, he takes the power to his head and becomes mean.







Offline WaltDisney

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« Reply #33 on: June 03, 2011, 02:02:38 PM »
I like F Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, Mark Twain, Emerson, Thoreau and a few others as favorites.


I recently ordered Arthur Butz-The Hoax of the 20th Century
David Irvings- Nuremburg
Shlomo Sands-The Invention of the Jewish People
Arthur Koestlers- The 13th Tribe
The New Jerusalem, High Priests of War and Judas Goats by Michael C. Piper.

Some traveling reading.
"I hardly exaggerate. Jewish life consists of two elements: Extracting money and protesting."
-Nahum Goldmann, Ex-President of the World Jewish Congress

Offline Sue

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« Reply #34 on: June 04, 2011, 08:07:38 AM »
I like F Scott Fitzgerald, John Steinbeck, Mark Twain, Emerson, Thoreau and a few others as favorites.


I recently ordered Arthur Butz-The Hoax of the 20th Century
David Irvings- Nuremburg
Shlomo Sands-The Invention of the Jewish People
Arthur Koestlers- The 13th Tribe
The New Jerusalem, High Priests of War and Judas Goats by Michael C. Piper.

Some traveling reading.

I read both of Solzhenytsin's books over the winter, the one Fireball posted and the Gulag, talk about surviving Hell while freezing your butt off. Arthur Koestler's e-book is on the forum page, eventually I'll get to read it too.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #35 on: June 04, 2011, 01:55:27 PM »
Quote
I read both of Solzhenytsin's books over the winter, the one Fireball posted and the Gulag, talk about surviving Hell while freezing your butt off. Arthur Koestler's e-book is on the forum page, eventually I'll get to read it too.

I have posted many books in this thread. Which one was the one you have read?

Offline Sue

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« Reply #36 on: June 04, 2011, 02:32:18 PM »
I finished reading MAO TSE-TUNG, he made China what it is today. His effect on China - 1/4 of the world population - has been so overwhelming it makes one gasp.

HG Wells 'Time Machine' sounds interesting.

Even though history is bunk, I will read "World History'', a nice little well illustrated book. From the source of early civilization in China and Egypt, through the strife of the middle ages, to the technological accelerations of modern times.

We took much of it in school, but one forgets...  ;)

"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline thomaspain

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« Reply #37 on: June 04, 2011, 07:22:03 PM »
Even though history is bunk, I will read "World History'', a nice little well illustrated book. From the source of early civilization in China and Egypt, through the strife of the middle ages, to the technological accelerations of modern times.
We took much of it in school, but one forgets...  ;)

   I keep remembering Judson's take on history.

   "After a lifetime of believing most of my earlier education it has become necessary in later life to re-learn virtually all of world history."
................................................................................................Judson- LF & FPF

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #38 on: June 05, 2011, 08:55:23 AM »
Quote
We took much of it in school, but one forgets...  ;)

Yeah, that is true :)

Offline fireball999

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« Reply #39 on: June 05, 2011, 09:01:54 AM »


This is the fourth book from the Gone series( first page at top of this thread ). I haven't finished reading it all yet, but it is still full of animals mutating, kids having unique powers and much more torture then in previous books. Now a dreadful disease is spreading throughout the FAYZ( world they are in ), water is running low as well as food and kids are dying every minute. What will happen. I got to finish the book to find out.

I love this series, so suspenseful!