Author Topic: Great Books!  (Read 10067 times)

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Offline fireball999

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Great Books!
« on: January 05, 2011, 08:46:49 AM »
There are many great books out there! I remember this series I read a few years ago and it was very thrilling!








What this series is basically about is where all the adults and people over 14 all of a sudden disappear from the world and everyone below 14 are left to fend for themselves. Apparently there is another book, but i have not read it yet!! As time goes on, the kids start to develop strange powers and animals begin to mutate and they all start fighting with eachother. There is a quote on the back cover saying that, "If Stephen King had wrote Lord of the Flies, it would have been like this''. In otherwords, it's gruesome in parts! I really did enjoy this series though!

Offline fireball999

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #1 on: January 05, 2011, 08:47:32 AM »
Give me some of your favorite books or series!!! :)

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2011, 02:23:25 PM »

Hmm...never heard of this Gone series. Sounds interesting.

Give me some of your favorite books or series!!! :)

I own a few of The X-Files books...some episodes & a few of the novels.  Also, the Nancy Drew & HArdy Boys series. :-[

I LOVE S. King's earlier works, everything from Carrie to the The Dark Tower Series. I've been reading his work since I was eight years or so. The Shining, IT, Gerald's Game were brilliant.

Horror fiction is a significant part of my reading. Select works of: Dean Koontz, H.P. Lovecraft, Edgar Allan Poe etc.

Really like fantasy-type, medieval sagas. A. A. Attanasio (Dominions of Irth trilogy, The Dragon & the Unicorn etc), David Gemmel's work (The Dark Prince), Terry Brooks' epics (the entire Shannara series), Barbara Hambley's trilogy with mercenary Sun Wolf & many more.

Classics: anything from: SHAKESPEARE, Dickens, Twain. Wilkie Collin's The Woman in White (his books should not be read on a tired mind), Orwell's 1984, R. L. Stevenson's Kidnapped, Treasure Island, naturally A. Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes series, Jules Verne, Anna Sewell's Black Beauty, Alexandre Dumas' The Three Musketeers, Johanna Spyri's HeidiIsland of Dr Moreau, Moby Dick Baum's Wizard of Oz, , Hardy's Mayor of Casterbridge, Tess of D'Urbervilles, Henry James' stuff, Steinbeck's Of Mice & Men, Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, anything from Roald Dahl (BFG, Matilda, Witches), of course Jane Austen.

Can't recall them all...

Offline wag

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2011, 05:51:58 PM »
The Zeta talk website makes for a good book. 
Nobody gets paid to tell the truth.

Offline laconas

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #4 on: January 05, 2011, 06:08:26 PM »
Give me some of your favorite books or series!!! :)

I recommend:




Plot summary


Alonso Quixano (or Quijano), a retired country gentleman nearing 50 years of age, lives in an unnamed section of La Mancha with his niece and a housekeeper. He has become obsessed with books of chivalry, and believes their every word to be true, despite the fact that many of the events in them are clearly impossible. Quixano eventually appears to other people to have lost his mind due to lack of sleep and food from dedicating all of his time to reading.

First quest

He decides to go out as a knight-errant in search of adventure. He dons an old suit of armor, renames himself "Don Quixote de la Mancha," and names his skinny horse "Rocinante". He designates a neighboring farm girl, Aldonza Lorenzo, as his lady love, renaming her Dulcinea del Toboso, while she knows nothing about this.

He sets out in the early morning and ends up at an inn, which he believes to be a castle. He asks the innkeeper, who he thinks to be the lord of the castle, to dub him a knight. He spends the night holding vigil over his armor, where he becomes involved in a fight with muleteers who try to remove his armor from the horse trough so that they can water their mules. The innkeeper then "dubs" him a knight, and sends him on his way. He frees a young boy who is tied to a tree by his master, because the boy had the audacity to ask his master for the wages the boy had earned but had not yet been paid (who is promptly beaten as soon as Quixote leaves). Don Quixote has a run-in with traders from Toledo, who "insult" the imaginary Dulcinea, one of whom severely beats Don Quixote and leaves him on the side of the road. Don Quixote is found and returned to his home by a neighboring peasant, Pedro Crespo.[2]


Second quest

Don Quixote plots an escape. Meanwhile, his niece, the housekeeper, the parish curate, and the local barber secretly burn most of the books of chivalry, and seal up his library pretending that a magician has carried it off. Don Quixote approaches another neighbor, Sancho Panza, and asks him to be his squire, promising him governorship of an island. The dull-witted Sancho agrees, and the pair sneak off in the early dawn. It is here that their series of famous adventures begin, starting with Don Quixote's attack on windmills that he believes to be ferocious giants.
Don Quixote de la Mancha and Sancho Panza, 1863, by Gustave Doré

In the course of their travels, the protagonists meet innkeepers, prostitutes, goatherds, soldiers, priests, escaped convicts, and scorned lovers. These encounters are magnified by Don Quixote’s imagination into chivalrous quests. Don Quixote’s tendency to intervene violently in matters which do not concern him, and his habit of not paying his debts, result in many privations, injuries, and humiliations (with Sancho often getting the worst of it). Finally, Don Quixote is persuaded to return to his home village. The author hints that there was a third quest, but says that records of it have been lost.

Part Two

Although the two parts are now normally published as a single work, Don Quixote, Part Two was a sequel published ten years after the original novel. Don Quixote and Sancho are now assumed to be famous throughout the land because of the adventures recounted in Part One. While Part One was mostly farcical, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Don Quixote's imaginings are made the butt of outrageously cruel practical jokes carried out by wealthy patrons. Even Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at one point. Trapped into finding Dulcinea, Sancho brings back three dirty and ragged peasant girls, and tells Quixote that they are Dulcinea and her ladies-in-waiting. When Don Quixote only sees the peasant girls, Sancho pretends that Quixote suffers from a cruel spell which does not permit him to see the truth. Sancho eventually gets his imaginary island governorship and unexpectedly proves to be wise and practical; though this, too, ends in disaster.

Conclusion


The cruel practical jokes eventually lead Don Quixote to a great melancholy. The novel ends with Don Quixote regaining his full sanity, and renouncing all chivalry. But, the melancholy remains, and grows worse. Sancho tries to restore his faith, but his attempt to resurrect Alonso's alter-ego fails, and Alonso Quixano dies, sane and broken.


Themes

See also: Cultural influence of Don Quixote
Don Quijote by Honoré Daumier (1868)

The novel's structure is in episodic form. It is written in the picaresco style of the late sixteenth century. The full title is indicative of the tale's object, as ingenioso (Spanish) means "to be quick with inventiveness".[20] Although the novel is farcical on the surface, the second half is more serious and philosophical about the theme of deception. Quixote has served as an important thematic source not only in literature but in much of art and music, inspiring works by Pablo Picasso and Richard Strauss. The contrasts between the tall, thin, fancy-struck, and idealistic Quixote and the fat, squat, world-weary Panza is a motif echoed ever since the book’s publication, and Don Quixote's imaginings are the butt of outrageous and cruel practical jokes in the novel. Even faithful and simple Sancho is unintentionally forced to deceive him at certain points. The novel is considered a satire of orthodoxy, veracity, and even nationalism. In going beyond mere storytelling to exploring the individualism of his characters, Cervantes helped move beyond the narrow literary conventions of the chivalric romance literature that he spoofed, which consists of straightforward retelling of a series of acts that redound to the knightly virtues of the hero.

Farce makes use of punning and similar verbal playfulness. Character-naming in Don Quixote makes ample figural use of contradiction, inversion, and irony, such as the names Rocinante[21] (a reversal) and Dulcinea (an allusion to illusion), and the word quixote itself, possibly a pun on quijada (jaw) but certainly cuixot (Catalan: thighs), a reference to a horse's rump.[22] As a military term, the word quijote refers to cuisses, part of a full suit of plate armour protecting the thighs. The Spanish suffix -ote denotes the augmentative—for example, grande means large, but grandote means extra large. Following this example, Quixote would suggest 'The Great Quijano', a play on words that makes much sense in light of the character's delusions of grandeur.

The world of ordinary people, from shepherds to tavern-owners and inn-keepers, which figures in Don Quixote, was groundbreaking. The character of Don Quixote became so well-known in its time that the word quixotic was quickly adopted by many languages. Characters such as Sancho Panza and Don Quixote’s steed, Rocinante, are emblems of Western literary culture. The phrase "tilting at windmills" to describe an act of attacking imaginary enemies derives from an iconic scene in the book.

Because of its widespread influence, Don Quixote also helped cement the modern Spanish language. The opening sentence of the book created a classic Spanish cliché with the phrase "de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme" ("whose name I do not wish to recall"): "En un lugar de la Mancha, de cuyo nombre no quiero acordarme, no hace mucho tiempo que vivía un hidalgo de los de lanza en astillero, adarga antigua, rocín flaco y galgo corredor." ("In a village of La Mancha, whose name I do not wish to recall, there lived, not very long ago, one of those gentlemen with a lance in the lance-rack, an ancient shield, a skinny old horse, and a fast greyhound.")

It stands in a unique position between medieval chivalric romance and the modern novel. The former consist of disconnected stories with little exploration of the inner life of even the main character. The latter are usually focused on the psychological evolution of their characters. In Part I, Quixote imposes himself on his environment. By Part II, people know about him through "having read his adventures," and so, he needs to do less to maintain his image. By his deathbed, he has regained his sanity, and is once more "Alonso Quixano the Good".

The novel contains many minor literary "firsts" for European literature—a woman complaining of menopause. When it was first published, it was usually interpreted as a comic novel. After the French Revolution it was popular in part due to its central ethic that individuals can be right while society is quite wrong and seen as disenchanting—not comic at all. In the 19th century it was seen as a social commentary, but no one could easily tell "whose side Cervantes was on." By the 20th century it had come to occupy a canonical space as one of the foundations of modern literature.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Don_Quixote

DON QUIJOTE DE LA MANCHA (1979) - QUIXOTE


« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 06:25:03 PM by sushigirl »
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Offline Sue

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #5 on: January 05, 2011, 06:11:02 PM »
The Zeta talk website makes for a good book. 

Good find, Pete. I have never heard of this Website.

Inuit Observations

The Inuit indians, who live on all sides of the Arctic Ocean (Greenland, Siberia, Alaska, Canada), were filmed to get their comments about climate change, but more than comments about the melting Arctic ice came out. Apparently, they have noticed that the Sun and Moon and constellations are not where they are supposed to be! In the trailer for the Before Tomorrow film, they state that the Sun is too high in the sky, and too hot, and the Earth has at the same time tilted to the North. They are documenting the Earth wobble!

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"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #6 on: January 05, 2011, 06:30:01 PM »
I recommend:


That is quite an extensive plot summary. Might even read it myself some day.
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 06:36:16 PM by sushigirl »
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #7 on: January 05, 2011, 06:52:54 PM »
That is quite an extensive plot summary. Might even read it myself some day.

Cervantes is to Spain what Goethe is to Germany and what Shakespeare is to England.

I was looking for a movie on youtube, in English, but it appears Hollywood never made a Don Quixote movie. Quite a few stage musicals though. This the closest thing I found, and it was made in Italy.

Quote

Man of La Mancha (film)

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Man of La Mancha


Theatrical movie poster

Directed by    Arthur Hiller
Produced by    Arthur Hiller
Written by    Miguel de Cervantes (novel)
Dale Wasserman (musical/screenplay)
Starring    Peter O'Toole (singing voice dubbed by Simon Gilbert)
Sophia Loren
James Coco
Harry Andrews
John Castle
Ian Richardson
Music by    Mitch Leigh (musical)
Laurence Rosenthal (incidental music)
Cinematography    Giuseppe Rotunno
Editing by    Robert C. Jones
Distributed by    United Artists
Release date(s)    December 11, 1972
Running time    130 minutes
Country    United States / Italy
Language    English

Man of La Mancha is a 1972 film version of the Broadway musical Man of La Mancha by Dale Wasserman, with music by Mitch Leigh and lyrics by Joe Darion. The musical was suggested by the classic novel Don Quixote de la Mancha by Miguel de Cervantes, but more directly based on Dale Wasserman's 1959 non-musical television play, I, Don Quixote, which combines a semi-fictional episode from the life of Cervantes with scenes from his novel.

The film was financed by an Italian production company, Produzioni Europee Associates, and shot in Rome. However, it is entirely in English, and all of its principal actors except for Sophia Loren are either British or American. (Gino Conforti, who plays the Barber, is an American of Italian descent). The film was released by United Artists. It is known in Italy as L'Uomo della Mancha.

The film was produced and directed by Arthur Hiller, and stars Peter O'Toole as both Miguel de Cervantes and Don Quixote, James Coco as both Cervantes' Manservant and Don Quixote's "squire" Sancho Panza, and Sophia Loren as scullery maid and prostitute Aldonza, whom the delusional Don Quixote idolizes as Dulcinea. Gillian Lynne, who later choreographed Cats, staged the choreography for the film (including the fight scenes).

Gino Conforti, as the barber, is the only member of the original Broadway musical cast to repeat his role for the film, though James Coco also played that role, briefly, on Broadway.


This Jewish movie/musical adaptation of Cervantes' novel( that means the Jews changed the whole story), has Don Quixote captured by the Spanish inquisition. This never happened in the original novel.

This is sort of like all Jewish films about Germany, they can't make one without having a plot about Nazis and gas chambers.


Quote
Synopsis

Main article: Man of La Mancha(the film)

Cervantes and his manservant have been imprisoned by the Spanish Inquisition, and a manuscript by Cervantes is seized by his fellow inmates, who subject him to a mock trial in order to determine whether the manuscript should be returned.


Cervantes' defense is in the form of a play, in which Cervantes takes the role of Alonso Quijana, an old gentleman who has lost his mind and now believes that he should go forth as a knight-errant. Quijana renames himself Don Quixote de La Mancha, and sets out to find adventures with his "squire", Sancho Panza.

Two changes are made to the storyline of the stage musical: one of them is the reason for Cervantes' imprisonment. The play begins with Cervantes and his manservant entering the dungeon, after which we learn that Cervantes incurred the wrath of the Inquisition by issuing a lien on a monastery that would not pay their taxes. But in the film's opening scene, we see a colorful festival in the town square, during which Cervantes stages a play that openly lampoons the Inquisition, thereby leading to his arrest on the spot. He and his manservant are then taken to the prison. Another change in the film occurs when the priest and Dr. Carrasco are sent to bring Don Quixote back home. In the stage version, they arrive at the inn and simply try to reason with him, but he pays no attention. In the film, in a scene directly inspired by Cervantes's original novel, an elaborate ruse is set up by Don Quixote's family. A man is brought in on a bier, apparently "turned to stone" through some enchantment. Don Quixote is told by the man's "relatives" that only he can break the spell, by fighting the dreaded Enchanter, Quixote's mortal enemy. This prepares us for the Enchanter's later appearance as the Knight of the Mirrors. The "stone man"'s so-called relatives are revealed to be Don Quixote's niece Antonia, his housekeeper, the priest, and Dr. Carrasco. (This means that the roles of both Antonia and the housekeeper are slightly enlarged in the film.)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Man_of_La_Mancha_%28film%29
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Offline Chauncey G

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #8 on: January 05, 2011, 07:07:57 PM »

I was looking for a movie on youtube, in English, but it appears Hollywood never made a Don Quixote movie. Quite a few stage musicals though. This the closest thing I found, and it was made in Italy.




Quote
“Perhaps the most fascinating component of the films directed by Orson Welles was the masterpiece he never lived to complete. Beginning in 1957 and continuing on-and-off for the next 15 years, Welles self-financed and directed an audacious film version of Cervantes' "Don Quixote" which brought the legendary knight and his rotund aide Sancho Panza out of 16th century Andalusia and into the world of (then-) modern Spain. But despite his genius behind the camera, Welles was remarkably neglectful in maintaining and preserving the footage he created and much of his work was considered lost...and the footage that remained was not properly stored! However, throughout the 1980s and early 1990s the Spanish filmmakers Jess Franco (who served as Welles' second unit director on Chimes at Midnight) and Patxi Irigoyen tracked down nearly all of the surviving footage, finished the incomplete soundtrack based on Welles' notes, restored the footage where they could and offered a reconstructed Don Quixote de Orson Welles in 1992...” – Phil Hall, Filmthreat.com





http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0104121/

Offline laconas

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #9 on: January 05, 2011, 07:20:42 PM »
Thanks CG.Do you have theories why Hollywood never a movie about this?

It's here, but you have to download their player.

http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/comedy/watch/v16030181GW8x6DpF
« Last Edit: January 05, 2011, 07:27:42 PM by laconas »
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Offline Chauncey G

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #10 on: January 05, 2011, 07:31:02 PM »
This is supposed to be a good one.







http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0050326/


Offline Chauncey G

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #11 on: January 05, 2011, 07:34:48 PM »
Thanks CG.Do you have theories why Hollywood never a movie about this?

It's here, but you have to download their player.

http://www.veoh.com/browse/videos/category/comedy/watch/v16030181GW8x6DpF

I don't know why Hollywood never did a movie about Don Quijote.

These are both on karagarga. I can give you a new invite if you like.

Offline Sue

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #12 on: January 05, 2011, 07:45:35 PM »
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #13 on: January 05, 2011, 07:49:33 PM »
I don't know why Hollywood never did a movie about Don Quijote.

These are both on karagarga. I can give you a new invite if you like.
Nobody censors what they agree with

Offline Sue

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #14 on: January 05, 2011, 07:52:05 PM »
Too bad, it is only a preview.  >:(
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline laconas

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #15 on: January 05, 2011, 07:56:56 PM »

I downloaded the player. I'll see in a few minutes if goes past the first 6 minutes.

BTW, you'd think after 500 years the Jews would put the Spanish Inquisition behind them.
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Offline fireball999

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #16 on: January 05, 2011, 09:53:49 PM »
Quote: Hmm...never heard of this Gone series. Sounds interesting.

It is very interesting! Your books sound intriging too! I am not a huge horror person, but I might just look into that.

Offline Jan Robertson

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #17 on: January 06, 2011, 05:17:24 AM »
The Zeta talk website makes for a good book. 

They already have one.

I was a member of troubled times (the forums) the nonprofit section of Zetatalk for several years, I stopped contributing in 2001... there are still a few of my 'solutions' to troubled times still on the site ... but many of them have been taken over by Mike and Roger from internet stuff... I left because of a conflict with Nancy (Leider) the founder of Zetatalk ... She was more opinionated than myself   :D :P

Truth extends beyond the border of self-limiting science. Free discourse among opposing viewpoints draws the open-minded away from the darkness of inevitable bias and nearer to the light of universal reality.

Offline Sue

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #18 on: January 06, 2011, 07:32:24 AM »
I left because of a conflict with Nancy (Leider) the founder of Zetatalk ... She was more opinionated than myself   :D :P

Funny....  ;D

"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline jewbacca

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Re: Great Books!
« Reply #19 on: January 06, 2011, 08:16:22 AM »
a nice collection of books:

http://www.iamthewitness.com/