Author Topic: * Beautiful Photography  (Read 13929 times)

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Offline Rudi Jan

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« Reply #80 on: January 21, 2012, 10:15:16 PM »
Every Child Needs A Pet
All one can say is... aaaaw. Too cute for words.
Suspend all belief. Get the facts ~ Rudi
No one rules if no one obeys ~ Lao Tzu

Offline Sue

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« Reply #81 on: January 22, 2012, 11:02:45 AM »
All one can say is... aaaaw. Too cute for words.

Gotta love them, they are so sweet and innocent...  :)
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline FrankDialogue

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« Reply #82 on: February 25, 2012, 11:04:31 AM »


Yoga instructor Jamie Tam

Offline Sue

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« Reply #83 on: February 25, 2012, 03:49:33 PM »
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline FrankDialogue

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« Reply #84 on: February 25, 2012, 07:43:12 PM »
Nice looking, did you sign up?  ;)

No as she teaches in Las Vegas...Strangely, she moved from NYC in 2001, taking a flight to her new home hours before the WTC came down.

Actually, she reminded me of my ex-violinist, Jessica Joy Myers,who also moved West to study and teach yoga...However, Jessica is primarily a stained glass artist and if you just Google her name, you can view her excellent work.

I also know another quite famous stained glass artist, Judith Schaecter, whose work is in museums all over NA...She has received Rockefeller money,  Guggenheim money,Pew fellowships...We had a flirtation years ago, as she admired my music but I was a bit too working class & she was moving in more 'rarefied circles,...She was sweet however...Take a look at her work and we can talk about it...Bye!
« Last Edit: February 25, 2012, 08:21:52 PM by FrankDialogue »

Offline Sue

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« Reply #85 on: February 25, 2012, 08:41:21 PM »
No as she teaches in Las Vegas...Strangely, she moved from NYC in 2001, taking a flight to her new home hours before the WTC came down.

Good timing!  :)

Quote
Actually, she reminded me of my ex-violinist, Jessica Joy Myers, who also moved West to study and teach yoga...However, Jessica is primarily a stained glass artist and if you just Google her name, you can view her excellent work.

I also know another quite famous stained glass artist, Judith Schaecter, whose work is in museums all over NA...She has received Rockefeller money,  Guggenheim money,Pew fellowships...We had a flirtation years ago, as she admired my music but I was a bit too working class & she was moving in more 'rarefied circles,...She was sweet however...Take a look at her work and we can talk about it...Bye!

Frank, please post do some of her art, you have good taste and always do a nice job with good commentary. 
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #86 on: February 26, 2012, 09:01:45 PM »
No as she teaches in Las Vegas...Strangely, she moved from NYC in 2001, taking a flight to her new home hours before the WTC came down.

Actually, she reminded me of my ex-violinist, Jessica Joy Myers,who also moved West to study and teach yoga...However, Jessica is primarily a stained glass artist and if you just Google her name, you can view her excellent work.

I also know another quite famous stained glass artist, Judith Schaecter, whose work is in museums all over NA...She has received Rockefeller money,  Guggenheim money,Pew fellowships...We had a flirtation years ago, as she admired my music but I was a bit too working class & she was moving in more 'rarefied circles,...She was sweet however...Take a look at her work and we can talk about it...Bye!

Always loved stained-glass...that & the organ music made being dragged to church a bit tolerable.  Went to the Louvre & they had nice exhibits...in USA major art museums don't seem to be interested, perhaps because the joo sponsors associate stained glass with Christianity.  At the Louvre I also wanted to see enamel art (another thing ignored by US Museums that in general don't feature Medieval art)--unfortunately the section was closed for renovation but at least they had one.

Offline laconas

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« Reply #87 on: February 26, 2012, 10:31:38 PM »
Always loved stained-glass...that & the organ music made being dragged to church a bit tolerable.  Went to the Louvre & they had nice exhibits...in USA major art museums don't seem to be interested, perhaps because the joo sponsors associate stained glass with Christianity.  At the Louvre I also wanted to see enamel art (another thing ignored by US Museums that in general don't feature Medieval art)--unfortunately the section was closed for renovation but at least they had one.

I know an older gentleman whose whole house is furnished with 400 to 500 year old pieces from English churches and monasteries. It's old, it's authentic, and it doesn't have much value in today's antique-world.
Nobody censors what they agree with

Offline Sue

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« Reply #88 on: February 28, 2012, 08:16:00 PM »
Moses Bridge - West-Brabant-Waterline



source

Sunken Pedestrian Bridge in the Netherlands Parts Moat Waters Like Moses!

No, your eyes are not deceiving you - the waters have indeed parted! This incredible “sunken” bridge located in the Netherlands is giving visitors a unique way to access a beautiful 17th Century Dutch fort. Designed by RO & AD Architects, the Moses Bridge literally parts the waters that surround the fort, allowing pedestrians to pass through. The bridge is made from sustainable Accsys Technologies Accoya wood, which is both FSC and PEFC certified.

A series of moats and fortresses were built over the West Brabant Water Line region of the Netherlands during the 17th century in order to provide protection from invasion by France and Spain. Fort de Roovere was surrounded with a shallow moat that was too deep to march across, and too shallow for boats. In turn the earthen fort had remained protected –until now.

From afar, the Moses Bridge is invisible to the eye. The flow of the moat appears continuous, as the water level remains at the same level, reflecting the surrounding foliage. As visitors approach the fort, the bridge appears as a break in the water with its sloping walls containing it.

First lying flush with the earth, the bridge then descends deeper into the ground. Lined with wood sheet piling for walls, the deck and stairs sit between. The bridge and its components have been made from sustainable hardwood that is Cradle to Cradle Gold certified. The Accoya wood is also treated with a nontoxic coating, protecting it from fungal decay and increasing its durability — an ideal material for a sunken bridge. Like a dam, the walls of the bridge hold the waters of the moat back, and like Moses, the bridge parts the waters so that pedestrians may pass.

The Moses Bridge gives visitors a unique opportunity to pass through parted waters, to eventually meet a historic fortress of defense.






















"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline FrankDialogue

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« Reply #89 on: February 29, 2012, 09:02:35 AM »
Jessica Joy Myers: Jessica, except for a one week course, is basically self taught:She is into the Hindu stuff



Life Marches On



Fortify



Hindu gods

Now, for Judith Schaechter: I warn you, Judith is weird, and I have trouble with her work, even though it is technically amazing



My one desire



Self Portrait



Still Life with Bank Robber

http://www.jessicajoymyers.com/

http://www.judithschaechter.com

Feel free to criticize and/or comment: This is not stained glass that you see in a church...



Judith in Studio



Jessica with my group circa 2008


« Last Edit: February 29, 2012, 09:36:31 AM by FrankDialogue »

Offline Sue

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« Reply #90 on: February 29, 2012, 03:42:04 PM »
Interesting and different art Frank, great 2008 picture of you too. Nice to be talented. Does she play an instrument as well?



@ edited to correct a spelling mistake.
« Last Edit: May 14, 2012, 08:50:48 PM by sushigirl »
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #91 on: February 29, 2012, 07:35:17 PM »

Pretty kewl.  Once knew an artist who did mostly painting but dabbled a bit in stained glass, nothing like these two though.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #92 on: June 21, 2012, 10:56:29 AM »



 





14 years old ~ Jenna's other passion...  :) 


"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #93 on: June 21, 2012, 02:55:53 PM »
Here is another one, this kid does not leave home without a sketch pad.



Too bad that my grandpa cannot see this.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline wag

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« Reply #94 on: June 21, 2012, 05:57:04 PM »
Nice contrast in colors on that.
Nobody gets paid to tell the truth.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #95 on: June 21, 2012, 09:48:43 PM »
Thanks Wag, she has good sense and a feeling for the arts.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #96 on: June 26, 2012, 07:33:12 PM »
Artist at work!

Need a good painter? This guy should qualify!

Take a look here!

This is quite amazing.


"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.

Offline EyeBelieve

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« Reply #97 on: June 26, 2012, 08:02:31 PM »
Need a good painter? This guy should qualify!

He is good & prolly has quite a market nowadays with many cities trying to dress up crumbling communities on the cheap:

http://www.city-data.com/forum/new-york-city/257896-when-bronx-burning-3.html

In the 1970's I was a little kid but I observe and remember everything. My introduction into this world was in Bushwick at Wycoff Heights Hospital in the 1970's. That neighborhood went down so fast it could have snapped your neck. This is what happened when the Europeans were blockbusted out of a neighborhood so some Realtor like Harry Bernstein could cash in on Federal Programs. Mr. Bernstein lived in Kings Point of The Great Gatsby fame and played a huge role in taking Bushwick from a vital working class enclave to a welfare slum in about ten years. These things do not happen by accident.

My early childhood in Bushwick Brooklyn consisted of burned out buildings with streets lined with stolen cars with parts removed and glass shattered. There was shattered glass everywhere you stepped with graffiti everywhere not a square inch of wall was clear. Loads of vacant lots and tons of stray dogs, packs of them sometimes just running loose on the streets. The roads were completely in disrepair and I remember lots of old brick roads with the trolley rails still exposed. The pot holes where huge. Hookers strolling around near Flushing ave and Troutman St. We would go to Knickerbocker ave there would always be dazed looking smackheads all over the sidewalks. When people talk about pimping this and pimping that I think of Troutman St 1979 and it is not so cool. Half the buildings were abandoned and burnt out, almost nobody worked. There was more people outside at night than during the day. The traffic of the late 1970's and early 1980's different than today. Imagine going over the Manhattan bridge to China town at rush hour with no delay. I remember driving over the 59th street bridge at the heart of rush hour and it only taking 10 mins. The city population was falling and Immigration from the third world had not yet kicked into high gear, I remember the roads being like a ghost town at times.

The Bronx was just as bad as Bushwick and I remember making trips up there in the early 1980's. One clear memory unique to the Bronx was in 1982 mayor Koch had this huge facade improvement program for burnt out tenements. City workers came in the burnt out buildings and installed faux painted windows into the burnt out shells of the building to made them look marginally better. As you passed block after block of burned out shells they would have this plywood faux windows filling the old window holes with a fake flower/window pane painted on there to make the post-modern welfare disaster look better. The empty lots of rubble up in the Bronx was what I remember the most, much of it was not removed for years.

You can but the blame for the death of the cities on Federal subsidized home loan and Federally subsidized welfare programs. Harry Bernstein and others like him were able to swindle millions while destroying working class New York. While I am sure there are a few success stories the majority of people using these federal programs did little to improve their position in life and ruined everyplace they touched.


Offline wag

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« Reply #98 on: June 26, 2012, 08:14:50 PM »
Moses Bridge - West-Brabant-Waterline


That might last a couple years.  Why wood?
Nobody gets paid to tell the truth.

Offline Sue

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« Reply #99 on: June 26, 2012, 08:59:21 PM »
They claim that bridge is made from sustainable Accsys Technologies Accoya wood, which is both FSC and PEFC certified.

Wood without compromise

Accoya® is the world’s leading high technology long life wood. Created via acetylated wood modification, using sustainably grown timber, the Accoya® process is non-toxic. It enables nature and creates a modified wood that matches or exceeds the durability, stability and beauty of the very best tropical hardwoods.

The Accoya® wood production process takes sustainably-sourced, fast growing softwood and, in a non toxic process that ‘enables nature’, creates a new durable, stable and beautiful product, a ‘treated timber’ that has the very best environmental credentials.

A new world of high performance wood, sustainable, low maintenance products – including windows, doors, decking, cladding and glulam structural beams – is opened up by Accoya wood. The exceptional properties of durability, stability, strength and beauty have even led to Accoya wood being used as the main construction material in a heavy traffic road bridge with a highly original design.

Accoya is helping to protect the world’s precious hardwood resources and is guaranteed for 50 years in exterior use and 25 years when used in the ground. This long life also provides an added benefit – helping to reduce carbon emissions.

Accoya® acetylated wood creates beautiful and sustainable possibilities, even in demanding applications.
"At any given moment there is an orthodoxy, a body of ideas which it is assumed all right-thinking people will accept without question. It is not exactly forbidden to state this or that or the other, but it is "not done".
...Anyone who challenges the prevailing orthodoxy finds himself silenced with.